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A royal household or imperial household is the residence and administrative headquarters in ancient and post-classical monarchies, and papal household for popes, and formed the basis for the general government of the country as well as providing for the needs of the sovereign and their relations. It was the core of the royal court, though this included many courtiers who were not directly employed by the monarch as part of the household.

There were often large numbers of employees in the household, strictly differenciated by rank, from nobles with highly sought-after positions that gave close access to the monarch, to all the usual of servants such as cooks, footmen, and maids. The households typically included military forces providing security. Specialists such as artists, clock-makers and poets might be given a place in the household, often by appointing them as valet de chambre or the local equivalent.

Among many of these households there are certain great offices which have become, in course of time, merely hereditary. In most cases, as the name of the office would suggest, they were held by those who discharged personal functions about the sovereign. Gradually, in ways or for reasons which might vary in each individual case, the office alone survived, the duties either ceasing to be necessary or being transferred to officers of less exalted station.[1]

In the modern period, royal households have evolved into entities which are variously differentiated from national governments. Most modern households have become merely titular.

Contents

EuropeEdit

The royal households of such of European monarchies have a continuous history since medieval times.

FranceEdit

GermanyEdit

  • 1. Supreme Officers of the Court (Oberste Hofchargen) - honorary functions
    • 1.1. The Grand Chamberlain (Oberst-Kämmerer)
    • 1.2. The Grand Cup-Bearer (Oberst-Schenk)
    • 1.3. The Grand Steward (Oberst-Truchseß)
    • 1.4. The Grand Marshal (Oberst-Marschall)
    • 1.5. The Grand Master of the Hunt (Oberst-Jägermeister)
  • 2. Chief Officers of the Household (Oberhofchargen)
    • 2.0. The Premier Marshal of the Household (Oberhof- und Hausmarschall, i. e. chief executive officer of the court)
    • 2.1. The Premier Master of Ceremonies (Ober-Zeremonienmeister)
    • 2.2. The Premier Master of the Robes (Ober-Gewandkämmerer)
    • 2.3. The Premier Cellarer (Ober-Mundschenk)
    • 2.4. The Premier Master of the Horses and Mews (Ober-Stallmeister)
    • 2.5. The Premier Master of the Hunt (Ober-Jägermeister)
    • 2.6. The Premier Captain of the Palace Guard (Ober-Schloßhauptmann)
    • 2.7. The Premier Master of the Kitchen (Ober-Küchenmeister)
    • 2.8. The Superintendent general of the Theaters (Generalintendant der Schauspiele)

Mannheim (Electors Palatinate)Edit

  • The Grand Master of the Household (Obristhofmeister)
    • Stewards (Truchsesse)
    • The Master of the Music (Hofkapellmeister)
    • The Scientist of the Court (Librarian, Masters of the Collections)
    • The Artists of the Court
    • The medical staff
  • The Grand Chamberlain (Obristkämmerer)
    • Court's Chamberlains (Hofkämmerer)
    • Life Offices
  • The Grand Marshal of the Household (Obristhofmarschall)
    • The Master of the Larder
    • The Master of the Cellar
    • The Master of the Tablecloth
    • The Master of the Silver and China
    • The Master of Kitchen
    • The Master of the Pastry
  • The Grand Master of the Mews (Obriststallmeister)
    • Court's Fourriers
  • The Grand Master of the Hunt (Obristjägermeister)
  • The Superintendent of the Court's Music

RussiaEdit

SpainEdit

SwedenEdit

United KingdomEdit

VaticanEdit

AsiaEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^   One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Household, Royal". Encyclopædia Britannica. 13 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 813–814.

External linksEdit