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"Ríe y Llora" (English: "Laugh and Cry") is a song performed by Cuban recording artist Celia Cruz. The song was written by Sergio George and Fernando Osorio, produced by George and released as the lead single from Cruz's final studio album Regalo del Alma (2003) on 12 July 2003. It was the final song recorded by Cruz, following being sidelined by a brain trumor and before her death on 16 July 2003.

"Ríe y Llora"
Celia Cruz - Rie y Llora.jpg
Single by Celia Cruz
from the album Regalo del Alma
Released12 July 2003
FormatCD single, vinyl
RecordedFebruary—March 2003[1]
GenreSalsa, pop
Length4:10
LabelSony Discos
Songwriter(s)Sergio George, Fernando Osorio
Producer(s)Sergio George
Celia Cruz singles chronology
"Pa Arriba No Va"
(2002)
"Ríe y Llora"
(2003)
"Ella Tiene Fuego"
(2003)

The song peaked at number twelve on the Billboard Latin Songs chart and number nineteen on the Billboard Latin Pop Songs chart. It led the Billboard Tropical Songs chart for eleven weeks in 2003. It also managed to peak at number thirty-five on the Billboard Dance Club Songs chart.[2]

BackgroundEdit

In 2001, Cruz released her fifty-ninth album, La Negra Tiene Tumbao. The album featured a top ten single, in its title track as well as another relatively successful single, "Hay Que Empezar Otra Vez".[3] "La Negra Tiene Tumbao" peaked at number thirty on the Billboard Latin Songs chart and number four on the Billboard Tropical Songs chart.[3] It received nominations for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Music Video of the Year at the Latin Grammy Awards of 2002.[4][5] The album won the Latin Grammy Award for Best Salsa Album.[6] It was nominated for Album of the Year.[4]

In December 2002,[7] Cruz was sidelined by a brain tumor.[8] In early 2003,[9] following a partially successful surgery to remove the tumor, Cruz returned to the studio to record Regalo del Alma,[8] weeks after the operation.[10] Cruz later died on 16 July 2003 of brain cancer,[11][12][13] at the age of 77.[8] Cruz asked that the song be the lead single for the album, "as it was the song in which she identified with."[14] "Ríe y Llora" was the final song recorded before her death.[14]

Musical compositionEdit

The song was composed in minor key tonality with joyful lyrics and catchy hooks. It features the use of a piano, brass horn ensemble and prominent percussion. It takes influence from Afro-Latin music.[15] The song experiments in pop balladry, accompanied by the use of an electric guitar.[16] According to a biography of Cruz, the song "is about laughing and crying. Cruz reminds her listeners to live their lives fully and enjoy every moment."[17] Cuban writer Jose Quiroga claimed the song to be "an appeal to live for the moment, and to understand that forgiveness is not forgetting, but rather the possibility of remembering without pain."[18] He opined that the song was appropriately titled.[18] The song is sequel to the songwriter's previous collaboration on Cruz's "La Negra Tiene Tumbao". The label wanted a new "La Negra Tiene Tumbao".[19]

Critical receptionEdit

The song received an American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers award for Tropical Song of the Year.[20] At the Latin Grammy Awards of 2004, the song won the Latin Grammy Award for Best Tropical Song.[21] At the ceremony, Regalo del Alma was awarded the Latin Grammy Award for Best Salsa Album.[22] It also received the Grammy Award for Best Salsa/Merengue Album at the 46th Annual Grammy Awards.[23] At the 2004 Latin Billboard Music Awards, the song received a nomination for "Tropical Airplay Track of the Year by a Female Artist".[24] "Rie y Llora" was awarded Best Latin Dance Song at the 19th Annual International Dance Music Awards.[25] It is considered one of Cruz's most significant songs.[26] According to the Spanish-language newspaper, El Pais, the song helped relieve the "nostalgia" caused by Cruz's death.[27] The song was covered by Raul Bier and Pablo Delvillar on the tribute album Tributo a Celia Cruz: Bachata Con Azucar (2003),[28] by Maruja on her debut studio album Azuca! (2005),[29]

Track listingEdit

No.TitleWriter(s)Producer(s)Length
1."Ríe y Llora" (Album Version)Sergio George, Fernando OsorioSergio George4:10
Total length:4:10

ChartsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Celia Cruz deja ´Regalos del alma´ en su último adiós". El Periódico de Aragón. 18 July 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  2. ^ "Regalo del Alma – Celia Cruz: Awards: Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  3. ^ a b "La Negra Tiene Tumbao – Celia Cruz: Awards: Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Selected Nominees For The Third Latin Grammy Awards". AllBusiness.com. 3 August 2002. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  5. ^ Susman, Gary (24 July 2002). "Trophy Time". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  6. ^ "3rd Annual Latin Grammy Awards – Winners". Latin Grammy Awards. Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences. 18 September 2002. Archived from the original on 1 December 2002. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  7. ^ Pareles, Jon (17 July 2003). "Celia Cruz, Petite Powerhouse of Latin Music, Dies at 77". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  8. ^ a b c "Celia Cruz: Biography & History: Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  9. ^ "Celia: The Life and Music of Celia Cruz". WLS-TV Chicago. ABC Inc. 15 February 2010. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  10. ^ Gurza, Agustin (17 July 2003). "Celia Cruz, 77; Queen of Salsa's Passing Marks the End of a Musical Era". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  11. ^ Pearlman, Ellen (1 April 2008). "Azucar! Celia: The Life and Music of Celia Cruz at the New World Theater". The Brooklyn Rail. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  12. ^ Townsend, Rosa; Vicent, Manuel (18 July 2003). "La muerte de Celia Cruz consterna al exilio cubano y a los artistas de la isla". El Pais (in Spanish). Ediciones El Pais, S.L. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  13. ^ "¡Azúcar en el cielo!". El Diario de Hoy (in Spanish). 17 July 2003. Archived from the original on 21 October 2013. Retrieved 17 June 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  14. ^ a b Castillo, Efrain (6 July 2008). "Estampas: Cinco años sin Celia" (in Spanish). El Universal. Retrieved 17 June 2016. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  15. ^ "Rie y Llora – Celia Cruz". Pandora Radio. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  16. ^ Paoletta, Michael (9 August 2003). "Billboard Picks: Essentials: Celia Cruz – Regalo del Alma". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  17. ^ Celia Cruz: The Queen of Salsa. Leading Musicians & Singers: Biographies of Famous and Influential Americans. Oldiees Publishing. 21 March 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  18. ^ a b Cuban Palimpsests. U of Minnesota Press. 2005. p. 218. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  19. ^ Hatfield, Greg (2008). 2009 Songwriter's Market. F+W Media, Inc.
  20. ^ "ASCAP Congratulates our 2004 El Premio Award Winners". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 20 March 2004. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  21. ^ Cobo, Leila (11 September 2004). "The Latin Grammys: Familiar Faces Hold the Spotlight". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  22. ^ "Lista de nominados al los Grammy Latinos". Terra Networks (in Spanish). Telefónica. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  23. ^ "2003: 46th Annual Grammy Award Winners". Grammy Awards. The Recording Academy. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  24. ^ Cobo, Leila (21 February 2004). "Billboard Latin Music Awards Finalists". Billboard. 116 (8): 67. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  25. ^ "22nd Annual International Dance Music Awards". International Dance Music Awards. Winter Music Conference. Retrieved 22 February 2017. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |work= (help)
  26. ^ Álvarez, William. "Celia Cruz: "Esta negrita no pasa de moda". Teletica (in Spanish). Televisora de Costa Rica S.A. Archived from the original on 20 September 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  27. ^ "Celia Cruz: legado de música y sabor tras 12 años de su muerte". El País. El País S.A. de Colombia. 16 July 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  28. ^ "Tributo a Celia Cruz: Bachata Con Azucar - Various Artists: Songs, Reviews, Credits: Allmusic". Allmusic. All Media Network. Retrieved 12 August 2016.
  29. ^ "Azuca! - Maruja: Songs, Reviews, Credits: Allmusic". Allmusic. All Media Network. Retrieved 12 August 2016.
  30. ^ "Hot Latin Songs: Sept 13, 2003 − Billboard Chart Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 13 September 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  31. ^ "Latin Pop Airplay: Oct 11, 2003 − Billboard Chart Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 11 October 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  32. ^ "Tropical Airplay: Aug 02, 2003 − Billboard Chart Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2 August 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  33. ^ "Dance/Mix Show Airplay: Jan 31, 2004 − Billboard Chart Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 31 January 2004. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  34. ^ "Dance Club Songs: Jan 10, 2004 − Billboard Chart Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 10 January 2004. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  35. ^ "Tropical Digital Songs: Sept 22, 2012 − Billboard Chart Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 22 September 2012. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  36. ^ "Year In Music & Touring: Hot Tropical Airplay". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 27 December 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  37. ^ Navas-Cantor, Judy (4 October 2018). "The 20 Top Tropical Songs of All Time: Don Omar, Romeo Santos, Daddy Yankee & More". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 4 October 2018.