Josephine Abercrombie

  (Redirected from Pin Oak Stable)

Josephine Avalona Abercrombie (born 1926) is an American horsewoman, businesswoman, boxing promoter, philanthropist, and founder of The Lexington School in Lexington, Kentucky.

Josephine Abercrombie
Born
Josephine Avalona Abercrombie

1926
NationalityAmerican
Occupationthoroughbred owner and breeder; philanthropist
Spouse(s)five times divorced
Children2 sons, Jamie Abercrombie Robinson and George Anderson Robinson
Parent(s)Lillie Frank and James Smither Abercrombie (married May 6, 1925)

Early life and educationEdit

Abercrombie is the daughter of Lillie Frank of Lake Charles, Louisiana[1] and Houston oilman James Smither Abercrombie (1891-1975). She rode quarter-horses on her father's ranch in west Texas then began taking lessons to ride a saddle horse before she was ten. That led to her competing in horse shows, including the Madison Square Garden where she won twelve blue ribbons at the 1953 National Horse Show.[2] She traveled back and forth to board school between shows in a private jet.[3] She graduated from Pine Manor Junior College[1] then Rice University in 1946.[4]

Personal lifeEdit

Abercrombie was married and divorced five times and has two sons.

In 1950 she married Argentinian architect Fernando H. Segura (1916-2013).[5] Her two sons, Jamie Abercrombie Robinson (1957-) and George Anderson Robinson (1959-) were born in Houston where they continue to live.[6] In 1964 she married Tony Bryan, a Harvard graduate and Royal Canadian Air Force pilot. He became president and CEO of J.S. Abercrombie's Cameron Iron Works in 1973 and fourteen years later they divorced.[7]

Pin Oak StudEdit

Abercrombie first came to the Keeneland Yearling Sale with her father in 1949, and in 1952 they built Pin Oak Farm in Woodford County, Kentucky.[8] Their early success included graded stakes winners such as Make A Play, Roman Patrol and Elocutionist. By 1987, Ms. Abercrombie had purchased a new Pin Oak Farm not far from the original one, and she established a thoroughbred breeding operation with sires such as Sky Classic, Peaks and Valleys, Maria's Mon and Broken Vow.[9] In 1995 the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association recognized Pin Oak Stud as the state and national Thoroughbred Breeder of the Year. In that same year Canada's Sovereign Award went to Peaks and Valleys for Canadian Horse of the Year and Canadian Champion 3-year-old colt.[10] The Pin Oak Stable currently houses nearly 40 broodmares and the stallions Bob and John, Cowboy Cal, Broken Vow and Sky Classic.[11]

Houston Boxing AssociationEdit

In 1982 Abercrombie started the Houston Boxing Association and within four years was hosting nearly 50 fights in a single year. With a nutritionist, her signed boxers live rent free in an apartment complex and training in a custom exercise facilities in Houston or travel to her Abercrombie Cannonade Ranch near Gonzales Texas. Abercrombie provides her boxers with health-care insurance as well as profit-sharing benefits.[12]

PhilanthropyEdit

Rice UniversityEdit

Rice University received gifts of at least $4.6 million from Abercrombie and acknowledged their gratitude when they created the Legacy Society and included her in it.[13] Her work as a member of the Rice University Board of Trustees left a lasting impression on the campus. Her work on the building and grounds committee began in 1979,[14] directing patronage in supporting high quality architectural projects in new buildings, continues today even after her retirement from the board in 1994.[4]

Kentucky Equine Humane CenterEdit

Abercrombie cofounded the nonprofit Kentucky Equine Humane Center which works closely with the state's major thoroughbred racetracks (Turfway, Keeneland, Churchill Downs and Ellis Park), where owners can surrender unwanted horses directly from a training or racing stable. The Center opened in 2007 in Nicholasville, Kentucky, and no horse is turned away nor are fees required for surrendering a horse to them.[15]

The Lexington SchoolEdit

One of Abercrombie's more beloved results of her philanthropy is a private K-8 school, The Lexington School, located in Lexington, Kentucky. It opened in the fall of 1959.[16] In honor of her 90th birthday, The Lexington School created a video that includes a variety of images of her early life and the beginning of the school: "A Birthday Salute to Ms. A" (January 25, 2016).

Political affiliationsEdit

Abercrombie is a strong supporter of the Republican Party as well as individual state and national leaders in the Republican Party, but she has also contributed to the campaigns of Kentucky politicians not in the Republican Party.[17]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Interview with Josephine Abercrombie, March 21, 2007; interviewer, Dan Kenny". 2007OH082 HIK 020 Horse Industry in Kentucky Oral History Project. Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Demaret, Kent (27 May 1985). "Heiress Josephine Abercrombie Becomes a Contender in the High-Stakes World of Boxing". People. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ Boycott, Rosie (17 November 1996). "scenes from a jolly awkward life". The Independent Culture. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b Fox, Stephen (2001). Rice University: An Architectural Tour. Princeton Architectural Press. p. 72.
  5. ^ "Fernando Segura". Chron Obituaries. Legacy.com (orig. pub in Houston Cronicle from Apr. 13-15, 2013). Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Carroll, Christine (September 1992). "The Texas 100: Survey Results". Texas Monthly. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Green, Michelle (7 September 1992). "Duchess in Dutch". People. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "Josephine Abercrombie". Texas Horse Racing Hall of Fame. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ Clabes, Joseph (22 September 2011). "Josephine Abercrombie: Grew up on horse, lives life full of interests, experiences, giving". KyForward. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ "History". Pin Oak Stud. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "Pin Oak Stable (Josephine Abercrombie)". Horseman Bios. Oaklawn Racing & Gaming. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ Applebome, Peter (12 May 1986). "Oil Heiress Brings Elegance to the World of Boxing". The New York Times. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ Almond, B.J. (23 September 2013). "75 donors honored with membership in Legacy Society". Rice University News & Media. Rice University. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ Scardino, Barrie; Webb, Bruce C. (2003). Ephemeral City: Cite Looks at Houston. Austin: University of Texas Press. p. 173.
  15. ^ Paulick Report Staff (17 November 2010). "Kentucky Equine Humane Center". Paulick Report. Blenheim Publishing LLC. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ Paulick, Ray (29 October 2015). "Abercrombie's Gift Of Education Keeps On Giving…And Giving". Paulick Report. Blenheim Publishing LLC. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ "Josephine Abercrombie: Houston horsebreeder and boxing promoter; heir to Cameron Iron Works fortune". LittleSis. Public Accountability Initiative. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

Other ResourcesEdit

External linksEdit

  • Littlefield, David (August 23, 2016). "Abercrombie, James Smither". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  • "Josephine Abercrombie". Texas Horse Racing Hall of Fame. Retrieved 27 November 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)