Particularly vulnerable tribal group

Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG) (earlier: Primitive tribal group) is a government of India classification created with the purpose of enabling improvement in the conditions of certain communities with particularly low development indices.[1]

The Dhebar Commission (1960-1961)[2] stated that within Scheduled Tribes there existed an inequality in the rate of development. During the fourth Five Year Plan a sub-category was created within Scheduled Tribes to identify groups that considered to be at a lower level of development. This was created based on the Dhebar Commission report and other studies. This sub-category was named "Primitive tribal group". The features of such a group include a pre-agricultural system of existence, that is practice of hunting and gathering, zero or negative population growth, extremely low level of literacy in comparison with other tribal groups.[3][4]

Groups that satisfied any one of the criterion were considered as PTG. At the conclusion of the Fifth Five year plan, 52 communities were identified as being a "primitive tribal group", these communities were identified on the basis of recommendations made by the respective state governments.[3][4] At the conclusion of the Sixth Five year plan 20 groups were added and 2 more in the Seventh Five year plan, one more group was added in the eighth five-year plan, making a total 75 groups were identified as PTG.[5] The 75th group recognised as PTG were the Maram in Manipur in 1993-94. No new group was declared as PTG on the basis of the 2001 census.[6]

In 2006 the government of India proposed to rename "Primitive tribal group" as Primitive and vulnerable tribal group".[7] PTG has since been renamed Primitive and vulnerable tribal group by the government of India.[8]

Names of the Primitive and vulnerable tribal groups - states / UT wise:[9]

Name of the States /UT Name of PTG Population, 2001 Census

(Figures in actual)

Andhra Pradesh and Telangana 1. Bodo Gadaba -
2. Bondo Porja -
3. Chenchu 49232
4. Dongria Khond -
5. Gutob Gadaba -
6. Khond Porja -
7. Kolam -
8. Konda Reddi -
9. Konda Savara 83096
10. Kutia Khond -
11. Parengi Porja -
12. Thoti 2074
Total 134402
Bihar & Jharkhand Bihar Jharkhand
13. Asur 181 10347
14. Birhor 406 7514
15. Birjia 17 5356
16. Hill Kharia - -
17. Korwas 703 27177
18. Mal Paharia 4631 115093
19. Parhaiya 2429 20786
20. Sauria Paharia 585 31050
21. Savar 420 6004
Total 9372 223327
Gujarat 22. Kathodi 5820
23. Kolgha -
24. Kotwalia -
25. Padhar 22421
26. Siddi 8662
Total 36903
Karnataka 27. Jenu Kuruba 29828
28. Koraga 16071
Total 45899
Kerala 29. Cholanaikkan -
30. Kadar 2145
31. Kattunayakan 14715
32. Koraga 1152
33. Kurumba 2174
Total 20186
Madhya Pradesh &

Chhattisgarh

Madhya Pradesh Chhattisgarh
34. Abujh Maria - -
35. Baiga 332936 6993
36. Bharia 152470 88981
37. Birhor 143 1744
38. Hill Korwa - -
39. Kamar 2424 23113
40. Saharia 450217 561
Total 938190 121392
Maharashtra 41. Kathodi 235022
42. Kolam 173646
43. Maria Gond -
Total 408668
Manipur 44. Maram Naga 1225
Odisha 45. Birhor 702
46. Bondo 9378
47. Chuktia Bhunjia -
48. Didayi 7371
49. Dongria Khond -
50. Juang 41339
51. Kharia 188331
52. Kutia Khond -
53. Lanjia Saura -
54. Lodha 8905
55. Mankidia 1050
56. Paudi Bhuyan -
57. Sauura 473233
Total 730309
Rajasthan 58. Saharia -
Tamil Nadu 59. Irular 155606
60. Kattu Nayakan 45227
61. Korumba -
62. Kota 925
63. Paniyan 9121
64. Toda 1560
Total 165103
Tripura 65. Riang 165103
Uttar Pradesh & Uttrakhand Uttar Pradesh Uttrakhand
66. Buksa 4367 46771
67. Raji 998 517
Total 5365 47288
West Bengal 68. Birhor 1017
69. Lodha 84966
70. Toto -
Total 85983
Andaman & Nicobar Islands 71. Great Andamanese 43
72. Jarawa 240
73. Onge 96
74. Sentinelese 51
75. Shom Pen 254
Total 684
All India Grand Total 3262960

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ B. M. L. Patel (1 January 1998). Agrarian Transformation In Tribal India. M.D. Publications Pvt. Ltd. pp. 313–. ISBN 978-81-7533-086-3. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  2. ^ Ram Nath Sharma; Dr. Rajendra K. Sharma (2004). Problems Of Education In India. Atlantic Publishers & Dist. pp. 46–. ISBN 978-81-7156-612-9. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  3. ^ a b Jasodhara Bagchi; Sarmistha Dutta Gupta (2005). The Changing Status of Women in West Bengal, 1970-2000: The Challenge Ahead. SAGE Publications. p. 130. ISBN 978-0-7619-3242-0. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  4. ^ a b Sarit Kumar Chaudhuri; Sucheta Sen Chaudhuri (2005). Primitive Tribes in Contemporary India: Concept, Ethnography and Demography. Mittal Publications. p. 2. ISBN 978-81-8324-026-0. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  5. ^ Bhagyalaxmi Mahapatra (2011). Development of a Primitive Tribe: A Study of Didayis. Concept Publishing Company. pp. 47–49. ISBN 978-81-8069-782-1. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  6. ^ Komol Singha (2011). Economy of a Tribal Village. Concept Publishing Company. p. 21. ISBN 978-81-8069-745-6. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  7. ^ Laxmikanth. Governance In India. McGraw-Hill Education (India) Pvt Limited. pp. 14–. ISBN 978-0-07-107466-7. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  8. ^ "Misconstruing order, Chhattisgarh tribals denied sterilisation for three decades". 2012-10-31. Retrieved 3 April 2013.
  9. ^ "Primitive Tribal Groups and their Population in India as per 2001 Census" (PDF). pib.nic.in. Retrieved 2016-02-27.