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Pac-12 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament

  (Redirected from Pacific-10 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament)

The Pac-12 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament, otherwise known as the Pac-12 Tournament, is the annual concluding tournament for the NCAA college basketball in the Pac-12, taking place in Las Vegas at the T-Mobile Arena.

Pac-12 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament
2015 PAC12 BBall Logo.jpg
Logo of the tournament
SportBasketball
ConferencePac-12 Conference
Number of teams12
FormatSingle-elimination tournament
Current stadiumT-Mobile Arena
Current locationParadise, Nevada
Played1987–1990, 2002–present
Last contest2019
Current championOregon Ducks
Most championshipsArizona Wildcats (7)
TV partner(s)Pac-12 Networks, Fox Sports and ESPN (2013-2024)
Official websitePac-12.org Men's Basketball
Sponsors
New York Life
Host stadiums
Pauley Pavilion 1987
McKale Center 1988
The Forum 1989
University Activity Center 1990
Staples Center 2002–2012
MGM Grand Garden Arena 2013–2016
T-Mobile Arena 2017–2020
Host locations
Los Angeles 1987, 2002–2012
Tucson, Arizona 1988
Inglewood, California 1989
Tempe, Arizona 1990
Las Vegas 2013–present

Contents

HistoryEdit

The predecessor conference of the Pac-12, the Pacific Coast Conference, began playing basketball in the 1915–16 season. The PCC was split into North and South Divisions for basketball beginning with the 1922–23 season. The winners of the two divisions would play a best of three series of games to determine the PCC basketball champion. If two division teams tied, they would have a one-game playoff to produce the division representative. Starting with the first edition of the event now known as the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament in 1939, the winner of the PCC divisional playoff was given the automatic berth in the NCAA tournament. Oregon, the 1939 PCC champion, won the championship game in the 1939 NCAA Basketball Tournament.

The last divisional playoff was in the 1954–55 season. After that, there was no divisional play and all teams played each other in a round robin competition. From the 1955–56 season through the 1985–86 season, the regular season conference champion was awarded the NCAA tournament berth from the PCC, later AAWU, Pac-8 and Pac-10.

Beginning with the 1975 NCAA Tournament, the league (known as the Pac-8 until becoming the Pac-10 with the 1978 arrival of Arizona and Arizona State) would usually place at least one other at-large team in the tournament. Following the end of UCLA's dominance in the 1970s, the Pac-10 would struggle to get out of the early rounds of the NCAA tournament.

By the 1985–86 season, the Pac-10 was one of three remaining conferences that gave their automatic NCAA tournament bid to the regular season round-robin champion. The other two conferences were the Ivy League and the Big Ten Conference.

1987–1990Edit

The modern tournament format began in 1987. The first incarnation of the tournament ran from 1987 to 1990, hosted at different school sites. UCLA was awarded the inaugural tournament, which was won by the Bruins, and the Arizona Wildcats took the next three. Citing academic concerns, it was dropped after 1990 upon opposition from coaches, poor revenue, and poor attendance.[1][2][3] The Pac-10 went back to having the regular season champion get awarded the automatic NCAA tournament bid for the 1990–2001 seasons. During that time, Arizona and UCLA both won NCAA championships.

2002 to the presentEdit

In 1998, the Big Ten began to hold a conference tournament, leaving the Pac-10 and Ivy League the lone conferences without postseason tournaments. (The Ivy League would not begin holding its tournament until 2017.) The Pac-10 tournament was restarted by an 8–2 vote of the athletic directors of the conference in 2000 after determining that a tournament would help increase exposure of the conference and help the seeding of the schools in the NCAA tournament.[4] Stanford University and the University of Arizona opposed the tournament, while UCLA's and USC's votes, considered the deciding votes, were swayed by permanently hosting the tournament at Staples Center.[5] Los Angeles is the second largest media market in the United States. The championship game has been broadcast nationally by CBS Sports.

With the 2011 championship game attracting only 12,074 paid attendees, less than two-thirds the capacity of Staples Center, commissioner Larry Scott reopened bids from other cities to host the Pac-12 Tournament. Other models including a round-robin model and hosting the tournament at conference sites have also been considered.[6] Ultimately, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, and Seattle submitted bids for consideration.[7]

On March 13, 2012, the Pac-12 Tournament was officially moved to the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, for a three-year term.[8] The tournament moved to T-Mobile Arena once it opened during the 2016–17 basketball season; the hosting contract between the Pac-12 and the arena runs through 2020.[9]

Television coverageEdit

Effective with the 2012–13 season, as part of the new television contract signed with Fox Sports and ESPN, one quarterfinal game, one semifinal game, and the championship game will rotate between Fox Sports and ESPN, with ESPN obtaining odd year tournaments and Fox Sports even numbered tournaments. All other games are broadcast on the Pac-12 Network.

FormatEdit

From 1987 to 1990 and 2006 to 2011, all ten teams participated in the tournament, with the top six teams receiving a bye in the opening round. Between 2002 and 2005, only the top eight teams in the conference participated in the tournament. Of the Pac-12 schools, only Washington State has never played in the championship game. In 2010 with USC on probation, only nine teams participated. Since 2012, all 12 teams have participated with the top four teams getting byes into the quarterfinals.

ResultsEdit

Year Champion (Seed)(AP)(Title #) Score Runner-Up (Seed)(AP) Tournament MVP Arena (City) Total Attendance
1987 UCLA (1)(18)(1st) 76–64 Washington (3)(NR) Reggie Miller, UCLA Pauley Pavilion (Los Angeles, California) 37,663
1988 Arizona (1)(3)(1st) 93–67 Oregon State (2)(NR) Sean Elliott, Arizona McKale Center (Tucson, Arizona) 66,477
1989 Arizona (1)(1)(2nd) 73–51 Stanford (2)(12) Sean Elliott, Arizona Great Western Forum (Inglewood, California) 41,994
1990 Arizona (2)(15)(3rd) 94–78 UCLA (4)(NR) Jud Buechler & Matt Muehlebach, Arizona University Activity Center (Tempe, Arizona) 36,052
2002 Arizona (2)(15)(4th) 81–71 USC (4)(22) Luke Walton, Arizona Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 67,819
2003 Oregon (5)(NR)(1st) 74–66 USC (7)(NR) Luke Ridnour, Oregon Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 63,663
2004 Stanford (1)(2)(1st) 77–66 Washington (2)(NR) Josh Childress, Stanford Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 60,126
2005 Washington (2)(14)(1st) 81–72 Arizona (1)(8) Salim Stoudamire, Arizona Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 62,147
2006 UCLA (1)(13)(2nd) 71–52 California (3)(NR) Leon Powe, California Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 74,801
2007 Oregon (4)(16)(2nd) 81–57 USC (3)(NR) Tajuan Porter, Oregon Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 84,477
2008 UCLA (1)(3)(3rd) 67–64 Stanford (2)(11) Darren Collison, UCLA Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 81,809
2009 USC (6)(NR)(1st) 66–63 Arizona State (4)(23) DeMar DeRozan, USC Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 77,452
2010 Washington (3)(NR)(2nd) 79–75 California (1)(NR) Isaiah Thomas, Washington Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 62,292
2011 Washington (3)(NR)(3rd) 77–75 (OT) Arizona (1)(16) Isaiah Thomas, Washington Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 56,051
2012 Colorado (6)(NR)(1st) 53–51 Arizona (4)(NR) Carlon Brown, Colorado Staples Center (Los Angeles, California) 63,414
2013 Oregon (3)(NR)(3rd) 78–69 UCLA (1)(21) Johnathan Loyd, Oregon MGM Grand Garden Arena (Paradise, Nevada) 63,750
2014 UCLA (2)(NR)(4th) 75–71 Arizona (1)(4) Kyle Anderson, UCLA MGM Grand Garden Arena (Paradise, Nevada) 69,445
2015 Arizona (1)(5)(5th) 80–52 Oregon (2)(NR) Brandon Ashley, Arizona MGM Grand Garden Arena (Paradise, Nevada) 70,563
2016 Oregon (1)(5)(4th) 88–57 Utah (2)(12) Elgin Cook, Oregon MGM Grand Garden Arena (Paradise, Nevada) 77,496
2017 Arizona (2)(7)(6th) 83–80 Oregon (1)(5) Allonzo Trier, Arizona T-Mobile Arena (Paradise, Nevada) 87,910
2018 Arizona (1)(15)(7th) 75–61 USC (2)(NR) Deandre Ayton, Arizona T-Mobile Arena (Paradise, Nevada) 80,550
2019 Oregon (6)(NR)(5th) 68-48 Washington(1)(NR) Payton Pritchard, Oregon T-Mobile Arena (Paradise, Nevada) 69,024
2020 T-Mobile Arena (Paradise, Nevada)

VenuesEdit

Venue City State Appearances Last Years Notes
T-Mobile Arena Paradise Nevada 3 2019 2017–2020
MGM Grand Garden Arena Paradise Nevada 4 2016 2013–2016
Staples Center Los Angeles California 11 2002 2002–2012
Pauley Pavilion Los Angeles California 1 1987 1987
McKale Center Tucson Arizona 1 1988 1988
Great Western Forum Inglewood California 1 1989 1989
University Activity Center Tempe Arizona 1 1990 1990

Tournament championships by schoolEdit

 
UCLA celebrating 2014 tournament championship
Member Winners Winning Years
Arizona 7 1988, 1989, 1990, 2002, 2015, 2017, 2018
Oregon 5 2003, 2007, 2013, 2016, 2019
UCLA 4 1987, 2006, 2008, 2014
Washington 3 2005, 2010, 2011
Colorado 1 2012
Stanford 1 2004
USC 1 2009

Note: No tournament held between 1990 and 2002.

Coaches with championshipsEdit

[10]

Coaches by all-time winning %Edit

(.760) – Dana Altman (Oregon), (19-6)
(.750) – Walt Hazzard (UCLA), (3-1)
(.739) – Sean Miller (Arizona), (17-7)
(.727) – Lute Olson (Arizona), (16-6)
(.667) – Tim Floyd (USC), (6-3)
(.667) – Bill Frieder (ASU), (2-1)
(.636) – Tad Boyle (Colorado), (14-8)
(.636) – Steve Alford (UCLA), (7-4)
(.600) – Jim Harrick (UCLA), (3-2)
(.579) – Ben Howland (UCLA), (11-8)
(.577) – Lorenzo Romar (Washington), (15-11)
(.571) – Henry Bibby (USC), (4-3)
(.571) – Cuonzo Martin (California), (4-3)
(.500) – Ernie Kent (Oregon/Washington St.), (11-11)
(.500) – Ben Braun (California), (7-7)
(.500) – Andy Enfield (USC), (5-5)
(.500) – Tony Bennett (Washington St.), (3-3)
(.500) – Steve Lavin (UCLA), (3-3)
(.500) – Ralph Miller (Oregon St.), (3-3)
(.500) – Andy Russo (Washington), (3-3)
(.500) – Mike Hopkins (Washington), (2-2)
(.500) – Murry Bartow (UCLA), (1-1)
(.455) – Mike Montgomery (Stanford/California), (10-12)
(.429) – Larry Krystkowiak (Utah), (6-8)
(.429) – Johnny Dawkins (Stanford), (6-8)
(.400) – Kevin O’Neill (Arizona/USC), (2-3)
(.400) – Kelvin Sampson (Washington St.), (2-3)
(.333) – Craig Robinson (Oregon St.), (3-6)
(.333) – Lou Campanelli (Cal), (2-4)
(.333) – Jay John (OSU), (2-4)
(.333) – Don Monson (Oregon), (2-4)
(.333) – George Ravelling (USC), (2-4)
(.333) – Bobby Hurley (ASU), (2-4)
(.286) – Wayne Tinkle (OSU), (2-5)
(.250) – Jerod Haase (Stanford), (1-3)
(.250) – Herb Sendek (ASU), (3-9)
(.000) – Wyking Jones (California), (0-2)


Note: Coaches with at least one win are listed here. Current coaches are in bold.

Coaches by tournament winsEdit

19 – Dana Altman (Oregon), (19-6)
17 – Sean Miller (Arizona), (17-7)
16 – Lute Olson (Arizona), (16-6)
15 – Lorenzo Romar (Washington), (15-11)
14 – Tad Boyle (Colorado), (14-8)
11 – Ben Howland (UCLA), (11-8)
11 – Ernie Kent (Oregon/Washington State), (11-11)
10 – Mike Montgomery (Stan/Cal), (10-12)
7 – Ben Braun (Cal), (7-7)
6 – Steve Alford (UCLA), (6-3)
6 – Tim Floyd (USC), (6-3)
6 – Johnny Dawkins (Stanford), (6-8)
6 – Larry Krystkowiak (Utah), (6-8)
5 – Andy Enfield (USC), (5-5)
4 – Henry Bibby (USC), (4-3)
4 – Cuonzo Martin (California), (4-3)
3 – Walt Hazzard (UCLA), (3-1)
3 – Jim Harrick (UCLA), (3-2)
3 – Steve Lavin (UCLA), (3-3)
3 – Andy Russo (Washington), (3-3)
3 – Craig Robinson (OSU), (3-6)
3 – Herb Sendek (ASU), (3-9)
2 – Bobby Hurley (ASU), (2-4)
2 – Mike Hopkins (Washington), (2-2)
2 – Bill Frieder (ASU), (2-1)
2 – Kelvin Sampson (WSU), (2-3)
2 – Lou Campanelli (Cal), (2-4)
2 – Don Monson (Oregon), (2-4)
2 – Jay John (OSU), (2-4)
2 – Wayne Tinkle (OSU), (2-5)
1 – Jerod Haase (Stanford), (1-3)
1 – Murray Bartow (UCLA), (1-1)
Wyking Jones (California), (0-2)


Note: Only coaches with 1 or more wins listed here. As of March 17, 2019

All-Time Records by TeamEdit

As of March 17, 2018
School Record Winning Pct Championships Runners-Up
Arizona 33–14 (.702) 7 4
UCLA 24–16 (.600) 4 2
Oregon 28–16 (.636) 4 2
Washington 18–17 (.514) 3 2
USC 17*–17 (.500) 1 4
Stanford 16–20 (.444) 1 2
Colorado 11–6 (.647) 1 0
California 16–21 (.432) 0 2
Oregon State 10–19 (.345) 0 1
Arizona State 7–20 (.259) 0 1
Utah 6–7 (.462) 0 1
Washington State 5–19 (.208) 0 0

*USC vacated its win vs. ASU in the 2008 Pac-10 Tournament.[10]

All-Time Records by SeedEdit

As of March 17, 2019
Seed Record Winning Pct Championships
1 43–13 (.768) 9
2 33–17 (.660) 5
3 24–19 (.558) 3
4 20–21* (.488) 1
5 16–21 (.432) 1
6 21–19 (.525) 3
7 18–22 (.450) 0
8 15–22 (.405) 0
9 7–18 (.280) 0
10 6–17 (.261) 0
11 0–8 (.000) 0
12 1–8 (.111) 0

*USC vacated its win vs. ASU in the 2008 Pac-10 Tournament.[10]

Pac-12 Tournament recordsEdit

Pac-12 Tournament team recordsEdit

  • Margin of victory: 33 pts., Oregon (vs. Washington State), (84–51), Mar. 13, 2019
  • Most points per game: 103 USC, (vs. Stanford) (78), Mar. 7, 2002
  • Fewest points per game: 39 Utah vs. Arizona, Mar. 13, 2014
  • Most points per half: 59 ARIZ vs. OSU (21), Mar. 12, 2008 (1st); 59 ORE vs. COLO (48), Mar. 12, 2015
  • Fewest points per half: 13 UTAH vs. ARIZ (34), Mar. 13, 2014
  • Most points per tournament: 278 Arizona, (3 games) Mar. 1988
  • Most field goals per game
    • Team: 39 UCLA, (vs. ASU) (39-of-71), Mar. 6, 1987
    • Both Teams: 70, UCLA (39) vs. ASU (31), Mar. 6, 1987;
    • Both Teams: 70, Arizona (37) vs. OSU (33), Mar. 11, 1989
  • Most field goal attempts per game
    • Team: 88, Arizona (vs. UCLA), Mar. 13, 2003 (33-of-88) (OT)
    • Both Teams, Game: 157, UCLA (69) vs. ARIZ (88), Mar. 13, 2003 (OT)
  • Highest Field Goals % per game: 68.3%, CAL vs. USC, Mar. 10, 1988 (28-of-41)
  • Most Assists Per Game: 23, ARIZ vs. OSU, Mar. 11, 1989
  • Most Steals Per Game: 14, USC vs. CAL, Mar. 14, 2003; 14, ASU vs. USC, Mar. 13, 2008;
    • 14, UCLA vs. USC, Mar. 13, 2009
  • Most blocked shots per game: 9, ORE vs. WASH, Mar. 7, 2002
  • Most personal fouls per game (one team): 42, Oregon 42 (vs. UCLA) (1990)
  • Highest field goal percentage per game: .683, CAL vs. USC, Mar. 10, 1988 (28-of-41)
  • Lowest field goal percentage per game: .255 Utah vs. Arizona, Mar. 13, 2014 (12-of-47)

Pac-12 Tournament individual recordsEdit

  • Most total points scored in:
    • Half: 25, Klay Thompson, Washington State vs. Washington, Mar. 10, 2011 (2nd)
    • Game: 43, Klay Thompson, Washington State vs. Washington, Mar. 10, 2011
    • Tournament: 83, Reggie Miller, UCLA, 1987 (3 games)
  • Most field goals per :
    • Game: 15, Reggie Miller, UCLA vs. Arizona State, Mar. 6, 1987 (15-of 20)
    • 15, Klay Thompson, Washington State vs. Washington, Mar. 10, 2011 (15-of-29)
    • Tournament: 27, Reggie Miller, UCLA, 1987 (3 games)
  • Most field goal attempts per:
    • Game: 29, Klay Thompson, Washington State vs. Washington, Mar. 10, 2011 (15-of-29)
    • Tournament: 60, Brook Lopez, Stanford, 2008 (25-of-60, 3 games)
  • Field goal percentage per:
    • Game (min 10 made): 1.000 Bryce Taylor, Oregon vs. USC, Mar. 10, 2007 (11-of-11)
    • Tournament (min 15 made): .791 Isaac Austin, Arizona State, 1988 (19-of-24, 3 games)
  • Game: Most 3-pt. FGs made
    • 8 Klay Thompson, WSU vs. Washington, Mar. 10, 2011 (8-of-14)
  • Highest 3-pt. FG % (min. 3)
    • Game: 100%, Bryce Taylor, Oregon vs. USC, Mar. 10, 2007 (7-of-7)
  • Most total rebounds per :
    • Game: 20 Leon Powe, California vs. USC, Mar. 9, 2006
    • Tournament: 41 André Roberson, Colorado, 2012 (4 games);
  • Most steals per :
    • Game: 7 James Harden, Arizona State vs. USC, Mar. 13, 2008
  • Most steals per:
    • Game: 5 Jason Washburn, Utah vs. Colorado, Mar. 7, 2012
    • Game: Ike Diogu, Arizona State vs. Washington, Mar. 10, 2005

Pac-12 Tournament final game team recordsEdit

  • Most total points scored in a final game: 172 (Arizona 94, UCLA 78)(1990)[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Pac-10 abandons its tourney". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). staff and wire reports. December 13, 1989. p. 1B.
  2. ^ "Pac-10 tournament eliminated". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. December 13, 1989. p. D1.
  3. ^ Matt Duffy – Vote Today On Pac-10 Tournament Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine. Daily Californian. Monday, October 23, 2000
  4. ^ Pac-10 News: PAC-10 APPROVES POST-SEASON BASKETBALL TOURNAMENTS YEAR-AROUND TRAINING TABLE ALSO APPROVED. Monday, October 23, 2000
  5. ^ Keith Carmona – Pac-10 votes to revive basketball tournament; Olson, men against tourney; Bonvicini happy for publicity. Arizona Daily Wildcat. Tuesday October 24, 2000
  6. ^ "Pac-12 expands its league and its exposure - college basketball - ESPN". Espn.go.com. 2011-08-16. Retrieved 2012-05-25.
  7. ^ Allen, Percy (March 6, 2012). "Husky Basketball | Pac-12 tournament appears headed to Las Vegas | Seattle Times Newspaper". Seattletimes.nwsource.com. Retrieved 2012-05-25.
  8. ^ http://www.sltrib.com. "Pac-12 chooses Las Vegas as new basketball tournament home | The Salt Lake Tribune". Sltrib.com. Retrieved 2012-05-25.
  9. ^ "Las Vegas to showcase best of Pac-12 basketball with hosting of Women's Tournament & Extension of Men's Tournament" (Press release). Pac-12 Conference. March 8, 2018. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  10. ^ a b c d 2013 Pac-12 Tournament Media Guide

External linksEdit