Opatje Selo

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Opatje Selo (pronounced [ɔˈpaːtjɛ ˈsɛːlɔ]; Slovene: Opatje selo, Italian: Opacchiasella[2]) is a village in the Municipality of Miren-Kostanjevica in the Littoral region of Slovenia, right on the border with Italy.[3] It is located on the Karst Plateau, along an old road leading from Komen to Gorizia. It includes the former hamlet of Mačeče.[4]

Opatje Selo
Village
OpatjeSelo1.JPG
Opatje Selo is located in Slovenia
Opatje Selo
Opatje Selo
Location in Slovenia
Coordinates: 45°51′4.73″N 13°34′57.68″E / 45.8513139°N 13.5826889°E / 45.8513139; 13.5826889Coordinates: 45°51′4.73″N 13°34′57.68″E / 45.8513139°N 13.5826889°E / 45.8513139; 13.5826889
CountryFlag of Slovenia.svg Slovenia
Traditional regionLittoral
Statistical regionGorizia
MunicipalityMiren-Kostanjevica
Area
 • Total3.79 km2 (1.46 sq mi)
Elevation
170.4 m (559.1 ft)
Population
 (2002)
 • Total377
[1]

NameEdit

Opatje Selo was attested in written sources in 1494 as Appatzell; the name of the village means 'abbot's village' in Slovene.[5] The name derives from the 12th century, when the village was first mentioned,[citation needed] because it was owned by the Benedictine monastery in nearby Duino.

Because of the frequency of two surnames, the northern half of the village is known as Marušičev konec 'the Marušič part' and the southern half as Pahorjev konec 'the Pahor part'.[4]

HistoryEdit

During World War I, the Battles of the Isonzo between Austria-Hungary and Italy took place here. The houses were rebuilt after the war, and water mains were installed in 1921.[4]

ChurchEdit

The parish church in the settlement is dedicated to Saint Andrew and belongs to the Diocese of Koper.[6]

Notable peopleEdit

Notable people that were born or lived in Opatje Selo include:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
  2. ^ Bosco, Umberto. 1968. Lessico universale italiano, vol. 15. Rome: Ist. della Enciclopedia italiana, p. 371.
  3. ^ Miren-Kostanjevica municipal site
  4. ^ a b c d e Savnik, Roman (1968). Krajevni leksikon Slovenije, vol. 1. Ljubljana: Državna založba Slovenije. p. 220.
  5. ^ Snoj, Marko. 2009. Etimološki slovar slovenskih zemljepisnih imen. Ljubljana: Modrijan and Založba ZRC, p. 46.
  6. ^ Roman Catholic Diocese of Koper List of Churches May 2008 Archived 2009-03-06 at the Wayback Machine

External linksEdit