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Ochagavia Wines (Spanish: Viña Ochagavía) is a Chilean winery, located in Macul, Santiago. The winery was founded in 1851 by Don Silvestre Ochagavía Echazarreta, an industrialist of the mining and agriculture.[1] He visited to Europe and studied the latest winemaking. After his study, he went back to Chile, bringing the new style to Chilean wine by the grapes from Bordeaux, France. The red grapes were Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Pinot noir etc. and the white grapes were Chardonnay, Sauvignon blanc, Sémillon, Riesling etc. Thus the winery contributed to change Chilean wine history,[citation needed] and the founder is referred to as the father of modern Chilean winemaking.[citation needed]

Ochagavia Wines
LocationMacul, Chile
Founded1851
Key peopleSilvestre Ochagavía (founder)
Websitehttp://www.ochagaviawines.com/

VineyardsEdit

Ochagavia Wines owns several vineyards in the region Central Valley and Aconcagua. In Central Valley's Maipo Valley, they cultivate Cabernet Sauvignon for their highest ranking Gran Reserva and in Central Valley's Rapel Valley, Merlot for Gran Reserva. In Aconcagua's Casablanca Valley, Chardonnay for Gran Reserva. They use over 80-year-old trees for Gran Reserva Cabernet Sauvignon.[2]

ProductsEdit

  • Gran Reserva
    • Cabernet Sauvignon (red wine)
    • Chardonnay (white wine)
    • Merlot (red wine)
  • 1851 Reserva
    • Cabernet Sauvignon (red wine)
    • Chardonnay (white wine)
    • Sauvignon blanc (white wine)
    • Merlot (red wine)
  • Silvestre Varietales
    • Cabernet Sauvignon (red wine)
    • Chardonnay (white wine)
    • Merlot (red wine)
    • Sauvignon blanc (white wine)
    • Carmenère (red wine)
    • Cabernet Sauvignon Rose (rose wine)
  • Medialuna Blends
    • Sauvignon blanc Sémillon (white wine)
    • Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot (red wine)
  • Sparkling Wine Brut (sparkling white wine, mainly chardonnay)

ReferencesEdit

  • Japan Sommelier Association Textbook 2009
  • H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine 5th edition, Japanese Version, published in 2006, ISBN 4-88282-293-8
  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-04-30. Retrieved 2010-06-30. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Sekaino Meishu Jiten 2006. Kodansha. 2006. p. 417. ISBN 4-06-213102-1.

External linksEdit