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Nokia 770 Internet Tablet

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The Nokia 770 Internet Tablet is a wireless Internet appliance from Nokia, originally announced at the LinuxWorld Summit in New York City on 25 May 2005.[1] It is designed for wireless Internet browsing and e-mail functions and includes software such as Internet radio, an RSS news reader, ebook reader, image viewer and media players for selected types of media.

Nokia 770 Internet Tablet
Nokia770-fi-wiki.jpg
ManufacturerNokia
TypeInternet appliance
Lifespan2005-11-03
MediaRS-MMC or MMCmobile
Operating systemInternet Tablet OS 2006 (Maemo (operating system) 2.2)
CPU252 MHz Texas Instruments OMAP 1710
Memory64 MB random-access memory, 128 MB Flash
Display800 × 480 resolution, 4.13 in diagonal, widescreen
InputTouchscreen
ConnectivityIEEE 802.11g, Bluetooth
PowerBP-5L Li-polymer 1500 mAh battery
PredecessorNokia 7710
SuccessorNokia N800

The device went on sale in Europe on 3 November 2005, at a suggested retail price of €349 to €369 (£245 in the United Kingdom).[2] In the United States, the device became available for purchase through Nokia USA's web site on 14 November 2005 for $359.99. On 8 January 2007, Nokia announced the Nokia N800, the successor to the 770.[3] In July 2007, the price for the Nokia 770 fell to under US$150 / 150 EUR / 100 GBP.[4][5]

Contents

SpecificationsEdit

  • Dimensions: 141×79×19 mm (5.5×3.1×0.7 in)
  • Weight: 230 g (8.1 oz) with protective cover or 185 g (6.5 oz) without.
  • Processor: Texas Instruments OMAP 1710 CPU running at 252 MHz. It combines the ARM architecture of the ARM926TEJ core subsystem with a Texas Instruments TMS320C55x digital signal processor.
  • Memory: 64 MB (64 × 220 bytes) of DDR RAM, and 128 MB of internal flash memory, of which about 64 MB should be available to the user. Option for extended virtual memory (RS-MMC up to 1 GB (2 GB after flash upgrade)).
  • Display and resolution: 4.1 inches, 800×480 pixels at 225 pixels per inch with up to 65,536 colors
  • Connectivity: WLAN (IEEE 802.11b/g), Bluetooth 1.2, dial-up access, USB (both user-mode, and non-powered host-mode)
  • Expansion: RS-MMC (both RS-MMC and DV-RS-MMC cards are supported).
  • Audio: speaker and a microphone

The device was manufactured in Estonia and Germany.

MaemoEdit

The 770, like all Nokia Internet Tablets, runs Maemo, which is similar to many handheld operating systems and provides a "Home" screen—the central point from which all applications and settings are accessed. The home screen is divided into areas for launching applications, a menu bar, and a large customisable area that can display information such as an RSS reader, Internet radio player, and Google search box, for example. Maemo is a modified version of Debian.

The 770 is bundled with applications including the Opera web browser, Macromedia Flash and Gizmo.

A critical bug has been identified that causes memory corruption when using the WLAN connection.[6] This could result in system instability and data corruption. Owners of the 770 are encouraged to apply the bugfix; preferably before having used the WLAN connection for the first time.

VersatilityEdit

Because of the Linux-based operating system and the open-source contributions from Nokia, the Nokia 770 Internet Tablet has a great appeal to the hacker and DIY markets. Programmers are porting applications to the Maemo platform, allowing a much more rapidly growing application catalog than other mobile platforms would enjoy.[7] The inclusion of Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and USB host functionality (through a hack) permits enthusiasts to expand their tablets to include USB mass storage, Bluetooth GPS receivers, a normal USB keyboard, or other devices.

CriticismEdit

The Nokia 770 has received criticism from some technology reviewers.[8][9][10][11][12][13] The most common complaint was about the overall speed of the system, due to the relatively slow CPU and the size of the on-board memory (64 MiB). Short battery life (less than 4 hours in the case of continuous Wi-Fi usage) was also a concern. Some reviews suggested problems with the handwriting recognition, and some said tapping the on-screen keyboard was too slow.

Another common complaint was that it lacked the functions of a mobile PDA, although there are now several PIM options created by the community. Also, for Internet access away from Wi-Fi hotspots, the Nokia 770 relies upon a Bluetooth 1.2 phone acting as a modem, and not all bluetooth phones will work with the tablet. Additionally, some[who?] complained that the device used Reduced-Size MMC (RS-MMC or Micro-MMC) cards that were originally difficult to find. However, the format has since been used in other products and has become widely available.[citation needed] The device originally could only use cards up to 1 GB, but 2 GB cards are supported with the current version of the operating system.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Nokia debuts Linux-based Web device". News.com. Archived from the original on 13 July 2012. Retrieved 5 November 2005.
  2. ^ "Nokia 770 Now Available in Europe". Internet Tablet Talk. Archived from the original on 24 November 2005. Retrieved 5 November 2005.
  3. ^ PDAStreet: News: N800, N76 & N93i - Nokia's CES Trio
  4. ^ "Nokia 770". Buy.com. Retrieved 2 July 2007.
  5. ^ "Nokia 770". Amazon.com. Retrieved 17 July 2007.
  6. ^ "Bug 2006 – Memory corruption during WLAN use". Bugs.maemo.org. Retrieved 22 June 2014.
  7. ^ maemo.org - ApplicationCatalog.
  8. ^ Nokia 770 Internet Tablet PDA reviews - CNET Reviews.
  9. ^ Nokia 770 Internet Tablet: Page 1.
  10. ^ Segan, Sascha. "Nokia 770". PC Magazine.
  11. ^ Review: Nokia 770 Internet Tablet - infoSync Reviews.
  12. ^ PDAStreet: Hardware Reviews: Review: Nokia 770 Wi-Fi Tablet.
  13. ^ Nokia 770 reviewed - Engadget.

External linksEdit