Mińsk District (1919–1920)

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Mińsk District[a] was a district of the Civil Administration of the Eastern Lands from September 1919[1] to September 1920, and Provisional Administration of Front-line and Phase Territories from September 1920[2] to December 1920,[3] all of which were under the control of the Second Polish Republic. Its seat was located in Minsk. In December 1919, it had an area of 35,947 km² (13,879 square miles), and was inhabited by 1 091 138 people.[4]

Mińsk District
Okręg miński (Polish)
District of Civil Administration of the Eastern Lands and Provisional Administration of Front-line and Phase Territories
1919–1920
ZCZW okręg miński map.svg
Location within the Civil Administration of the Eastern Lands
CapitalMinsk
Area 
• 1919
35,947 km2 (13,879 sq mi)
Population 
• 1919
1,091,138
History
History 
• Formation of Brześć District
15 September 1919
9 September 1920
• Incorporation into Second Polish Republic
20 December 1920
Contained within
 • Civil administration Civil Administration of the Eastern Lands (September 1919 – September 1920
Provisional Administration of Front-line and Phase Territories (September 1920 – December 1920)
Political subdivisionsFrom 5 to 8 counties
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Lithuanian–Byelorussian SSR
Byelorussian SSR
Nowogródek District

It was established on 15 September 1919 from the lands conquered from the Socialist Soviet Republic of Lithuania and Belorussia by Poland.[1] On 17 January 1920, it was incorporated into Provisional Administration of Front-line and Phase Territories.[2] On 20 December 1920, the civil administration was disestablished and the district was divided between Nowogródek District, Second Polish Republic and Byelorussian SSR.[3]

HistoryEdit

It was established on 7 June 1919 with the formation of Civil Administration of the Lands of Volhynia and Podolian Front, from the lands conquered from the Socialist Soviet Republic of Lithuania and Belorussia.[1] It was formed as a district of the civil administration under the control of Second Polish Republic, of the lands conquered by it during the Polish–Soviet War. Its seat was located in Minsk. The region was governed by the Chief of District.[5]

It consisted of the counties of Bobrujsk, Borysów, Ihumeń, Mińsk and Słuck.

On 9 September 1920, the district was incorporated into, then formed, Provisional Administration of Front-line and Phase Territories.[2] On the same day, from Lepelsky and Polotsky Uyezds was formed Lepel County.[6] On 25 October 1920, city of Minsk was separated from Mińsk County forming a separate county.[7] On 12 December 1920 was formed Stołpce County.

On 20 December 1920, the civil administration was disestablished and lands of the district were divided between Second Polish Republic and Byelorussian SSR, with Poland incorporating Stołpce County into Nowogródek District.[3]

DemographyEdit

In December 1919, the district was inhabited by 1,091,138 people, and had an area of 35,947 km² (13,879 square miles), having the population density of 30,4 people/km² (78.6 people/square mile). The biggest cities were: Minsk with 102 392 inhabitants, Babruysk with 29 704, and Slutsk with 14 162. The territory included 8,781 other settlements, from which 1 had population between 5 and 10 thousand people and 31, between 1 and 5 thousand. Out of the peoplulation 64.5% identified themselves as Belarusian, 14.6% as Polish, 11.3% as Jewish, 3.5% as Locals, 0.2% as Lithuanin and 5.9% as others, mainly Russians.[4]

EducationEdit

In the school year of 1919/1920, the district had 1123 primary schools, 71 middle schools and 14 vocational schools. To all schools had attended 84 690 students and had taught 2454 teachers. In March 1920, there were 279 schools that taught in Polish language and 1,208 that taught in others. Among the middle schools, there were 643 teachings in Russian language with 42 541 students and 906 teachers, 262 in the Polish language with 13 106 students and 348 teachers, 194 in Belarussian language with 10 417 students and 271 teachers, and 24 in Yiddish with 2633 students and 99 teachers.[8]

SubdivisionsEdit

City countiesEdit

  • Minsk (from 25 October 1920)

Land countiesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Polish: Okręg miński

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Dz. Urz. ZCZW z 1919 r. Nr 19, poz. 174
  2. ^ a b c Dziennik Rozkazów z 1920 r. Nr 35, poz. 753.
  3. ^ a b c Dz.U. z 1920 r. nr 115, poz. 762
  4. ^ a b Tablice ogólne in Zeszyt VII. Spis ludności na terenach administrowanych przez Zarząd Cywilny Ziem Wschodnich (grudzień 1919). Lviv–Warsaw: Książnica Polska T-wa Naucz. Szkół Wyższych, 1920. p. 25. series: Prace geograficzne by Eugenjusz Romer.
  5. ^ Joanna Gierowska-Kałłaur, Zarząd cywilny ziem wschodnich. Warsaw. 2003.
  6. ^ Dz. Urz. ZCZW z 1920 r. Nr 9, poz. 149
  7. ^ Dz. Urz. ZCZW z 1919 r. Nr 26, poz. 276
  8. ^ Rozdział VII. Szkolnictwo na ziemiach podległych Zarządowi Cywilnemu Ziem Wschodnich by Joanna Gierowska-Kałłaur in Zarząd Cywilny Ziem Wschodnich (19 lutego 1919 – 9 września 1920) by Joanna Gierowska-Kałłaur. Warsaw.Wydawnictwo Neriton, Instytut Historii PAN, 2003, p. 243. ISBN 83-88973-60-6.