Man Alive (Canadian TV program)

  (Redirected from Man Alive (Canadian TV series))

Man Alive is a Canadian television program about faith and spirituality. It took its name from a poem by St. Irenaeus, a 2nd-century Bishop of Lyon who wrote: The glory of God is man fully alive, and the life of man is the vision of God. The program debuted in 1967 on CBC Television, and was hosted by Roy Bonisteel for more than two decades. After several seasons of co-productions with Vision TV and the Life Network, the last episode aired on CBC Television on December 17, 2000.

Bonisteel retired in 1989, and was replaced by Peter Downie who left in 1993. Arthur Kent succeeded Downie for one season,[1] and then R. H. Thomson hosted until the program was cancelled.

Man Alive took a diverse non-denominational approach to religious and spiritual matters. The program covered a wide range of topics: nuclear war, UFOs, Holocaust survivors, sexual abuse, Third World development, family relationships, people with disabilities, the Vatican Bank scandal and profiles of religious figures such as Mother Teresa, Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hilton, Andrew (Spring 1994). "The Scud Stud has Come Home". Ryerson Review of Journalism. Archived from the original on April 15, 2012.

External linksEdit