Kim Ki-soo

  (Redirected from Ki-Soo Kim)

Kim Ki-soo (Korean김기수; Hanja金基洙; RRGim Gi-su; MRKim Kisu; 17 September 1939 – 10 June 1997) was a South Korean southpaw boxer at middleweight. He was South Korea's first world boxing champion.[1]

Kim Ki-soo
Kim Ki-soo 1968.jpg
Kim Ki-soo c. 1968
Statistics
Real nameKim Ki-soo
Weight(s)
Height5 ft 7 in (170 cm)
Reach69+12 in (177 cm)
NationalitySouth Korean
Born(1939-09-17)17 September 1939
Hokusei, Chōsen
(nowadays Pukchong, North Korea)
Died10 June 1997(1997-06-10) (aged 57)
Seoul, South Korea
StanceSouthpaw
Boxing record
Total fights37
Wins33
Wins by KO17
Losses2
Draws2
Medal record
Representing  South Korea
Asian Games
Gold medal – first place Tokyo 1958 Welterweight

Amateur careerEdit

Kim graduated from Kyung Hee University's College of Physical Education.[1] He competed in boxing at the 1958 Asian Games in Tokyo, where he earned the gold medal of the welterweight division by defeating Soren Pirjanian of Iran, on points, in the final.[2] He went on to represent South Korea as a welterweight at the 1960 Rome Olympic Games, where he defeated Henry Perry (Ireland) on points, but then lost to Nino Benvenuti (Italy) on points.[3]

Professional careerEdit

Kim turned professional in 1961 and captured the WBC, WBA and Lineal light middleweight title when he upset Nino Benvenuti by split decision in 1966.[4] He defended the belt twice before losing it to Sandro Mazzinghi in 1968 by split decision. He retired the following year.[5]

Later lifeEdit

After his retirement, Kim worked as a boxing coach. He later started his own company, and was successful in business. He died of liver cancer on 10 June 1997, at the age of 57. He was survived by his wife Jeong Ha-ja (鄭夏子), two sons, and two daughters.[1]

Professional boxing recordEdit

Professional record summary
37 fights 33 wins 2 losses
By knockout 17 0
By decision 16 2
By disqualification 0 0
Draws 2
No. Result Record Opponent Type Round Date Location Notes
37 Win 33–2–2   Hisao Minami PTS 12 Mar 1, 1969   Seoul, South Korea Won OPBF middleweight title
36 Loss 32–2–2   Hisao Minami MD 12 Nov 20, 1968   Osaka, Japan Lost OPBF middleweight title
35 Loss 32–1–2   Sandro Mazzinghi SD 15 May 26, 1968   Stadio San Siro, Milan, Italy Lost WBA and WBC light-middleweight titles
34 Win 32–0–2   Benkei Fujikura UD 10 Apr 4, 1968   Japan
33 Win 31–0–2   Yoshiaki Akasaka PTS 10 Mar 11, 1968   Japan
32 Win 30–0–2   Manfredo Alipala PTS 12 Feb 17, 1968   Seoul, South Korea Retained OPBF middleweight title
31 Win 29–0–2   Apidej Sithiran PTS 10 Nov 8, 1967   Bangkok, Thailand
30 Win 28–0–2   Freddie Little SD 15 Oct 3, 1967   Dongdaemun Baseball Stadium, Seoul, South Korea Retained WBA and WBC light-middleweight titles
29 Win 27–0–2   Nakao Sasazaki KO 6 (12) Sep 7, 1967   Japan Retained OPBF middleweight title
28 Win 26–0–2   George Carter KO 5 (10) Mar 25, 1967   Seoul, South Korea
27 Win 25–0–2   Stan Harrington UD 15 Dec 17, 1966   Changchung Gymnasium, Seoul, South Korea Retained WBA and WBC light-middleweight titles
26 Win 24–0–2   Ken Sato KO 4 (12) Nov 5, 1966   Seoul, South Korea
25 Win 23–0–2   Nino Benvenuti SD 15 Jun 25, 1966   Changchung Gymnasium, Seoul, South Korea Won WBA and WBC light-middleweight titles
24 Win 22–0–2   Hideaki Takada KO 10 (12) Apr 30, 1966   Seoul, South Korea Retained OPBF middleweight title
23 Win 21–0–2   Ben Argoncillo KO 9 (?) Jan 23, 1966   Seoul, South Korea
22 Win 20–0–2   Sakuji Shinozawa KO 7 (10) Oct 30, 1965   Seoul, South Korea
21 Win 19–0–2   Masao Gondo PTS 10 Sep 20, 1965   Japan
20 Win 18–0–2   Fumio Kaizu PTS 12 Jun 19, 1965   Seoul, South Korea Retained OPBF middleweight title
19 Win 17–0–2   Masao Gondo PTS 10 Apr 17, 1965   Seoul, South Korea
18 Win 16–0–2   Han Jung-il KO 4 (?) Mar 28, 1965   Busan, South Korea
17 Win 15–0–2   Kazuto Fujiyama KO 4 (?) Mar 6, 1965   Seoul, South Korea
16 Win 14–0–2   Fumio Kaizu KO 6 (12) Jan 10, 1965   Japan Won OPBF middleweight title
15 Win 13–0–2   Yoshiaki Akasaka RTD 7 (10) Nov 21, 1964   Seoul, South Korea
14 Draw 12–0–2   Kim Deuk-bong PTS 10 Oct 10, 1964   Seoul, South Korea
13 Win 12–0–1   Kang Kyu-soon KO 8 (?) Sep 20, 1964   Seoul, South Korea
12 Win 11–0–1   Roberto Pena PTS 10 Mar 18, 1964   Metropolitan Gymnasium, Seoul, South Korea
11 Win 10–0–1   George Carter KO 6 (?) Jan 22, 1964   Japan
10 Win 9–0–1   Noboru Saito KO 6 (10) Dec 22, 1963   Yasaka Hall, Kyoto, Japan
9 Win 8–0–1   Kang Se-chul PTS 10 Dec 14, 1963   Seoul, South Korea Retained South Korea middleweight title
8 Win 7–0–1   Kang Kyu-soon PTS 10 Jul 2, 1963   Yeosu, South Korea
7 Win 6–0–1   Kang Kyu-soon PTS 10 May 24, 1963   Busan, South Korea
6 Win 5–0–1   Roberto Pena KO 6 (?) May 18, 1963   Seoul, South Korea
5 Draw 4–0–1   Sakuji Shinozawa TD 3 (10) Jul 29, 1962   Japan
4 Win 4–0   Makoto Watanabe KO 3 (?) Jul 1, 1962   Japan
3 Win 3–0   Ansano Lee TKO 6 (10) Dec 20, 1961   Seoul, South Korea
2 Win 2–0   Kang Se-chul KO 7 (?) Nov 1, 1961   Seoul, South Korea Date unknown
1 Win 1–0   Kang Se-chul PTS 10 Oct 1, 1961   Seoul, South Korea Won South Korea middleweight title
Date unknown

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "국내 첫 프로권투 세계챔피언 金基洙씨 별세" [First domestic pro boxing world champion Kim Ki-soo passes away]. Yonhap News. 1997-06-11. Retrieved 2014-07-07.
  2. ^ "拳鬪에大勝 鄭東薰金基洙選手堂堂優勝" [Big victory in boxing: Chung Dong-hoon, Kim Ki-soo both win]. The Dong-a Ilbo. 1958-06-02. Retrieved 2014-07-06.
  3. ^ Kim Gi-Su. sports-reference.com
  4. ^ "The Lineal Junior Middlleweight Champions". The Cyber Boxing Zone Encyclopedia.
  5. ^ Boxing record for Kim Ki-soo from BoxRec (registration required)

External linksEdit

Achievements
Preceded by WBA Junior middleweight champion
June 25, 1966 – May 26, 1968
Succeeded by
WBC Junior middleweight champion
June 25, 1966 – May 26, 1968
Undisputed Junior middleweight champion
June 25, 1966 – May 26, 1968