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The Kazakh (Kazakh: Qazaq) is a horse breed of the Kazakh people, who live mainly in Kazakhstan, but also in parts of China, Mongolia, Russia and Uzbekistan. It is used mainly as a riding horse, and is known for its hardiness and stamina.[1]

Kazakh Horse
SB - Kazakh man on horse with golden eagle.jpg
Other namesKazakh
Country of originKazakhstan
Traits
Distinguishing featuresEasy keeper, great endurance and stamina

Contents

CharacteristicsEdit

The Kazakh horse averages 144 centimetres (14.0 12 hands; 56 12 in) for stallions and mares average 142 centimetres (14.0 hands; 56 in). They weigh between 400 to 500 kilograms (880 to 1,100 lb). The breed is criticized for a short stride and a jolting trot. However, they are also very hardy and able to cover long distances.[1]

The breed consists of two subtypes, the Adaev and the Dzhab or Jabe. The Dzhabe developed in the southern districts of Aktubinsk. They have a heavy head, thick, short neck, and deep chest. They have a straight back, strong legs and a well-muscled croup. They are usually bay, dark bay, chestnut or gray. The Adaevs are more refined with lighter heads, longer necks, and well-defined withers. Due to the primitive conditions in which they live, this strain is more susceptible to developing narrow chests and light bone structure.[1]

HistoryEdit

Horses in the region of Kazakhstan date to the 5th century B.C. Early influences on what today is the Kazakh horse include the Akhal-Teke, Arabian, Karabair, and Mongolian horse. Beginning in the 20th century, the breed had additional infusions of blood from the Russian Don, Orlov Trotter and the Thoroughbred.[1]

The Kazakh today resembles a more elegant version of the Mongolian horse. The breed is still bred by once-nomadic Kazakh tribesmen, although cross-breeding has somewhat diluted the traditional bloodlines.[2]

UsesEdit

Today, the Kazakh horses are seen mostly in western Kazakhstan, where there are over 300,000.[1] The main use of the Kazakh is for riding,[3] although they are also bred for horsemeat.[1]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Staff. "Kazakh". Breeds of Livestock. Oklahoma State University. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  2. ^ "The Sports of Presidents and the 'Sport of Kings'. Hellenic Resources Network. Referenced January 16, 2008.
  3. ^ Bongianni, Maurizio (1988). Simon & Schuster's Guide to Horses and Ponies. Simon & Schuster, Inc. p. 164. ISBN 0-671-66068-3.

External linksEdit