James Hayes (bishop)

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James Thomas Gibbons Hayes, S.J. (11 February 1889 – 28 March 1980) was an American, Roman Catholic, Jesuit archbishop and missionary who served as the first Archbishop of Cagayan de Oro in the Philippines.[1]


James Hayes

Archbishop of Cagayan de Oro
RevJames T.G.Hayes.jpg
Portrait of Hayes
ProvinceEcclesiastical Province of Cagayan de Oro
SeeCagayan de Oro
Installed29 June 1951
Term ended13 October 1970
PredecessorInaugural holder
First Archbishop of Cagayan de Oro
also, First Bishop of Cagayan de Oro
SuccessorPatrick Cronin
Other postsFounder, Xavier University
Founder, Lourdes College
Orders
Ordination29 June 1921
Consecration18 June 1933
by Patrick Joseph Hayes
Personal details
Birth nameJames Thomas Gibbons Hayes
Born11 February 1889
New York City, United States
Died28 March 1980(1980-03-28) (aged 91)
Cagayan de Oro, Philippines
BuriedSaint Augustine Metropolitan Cathedral in Cagayan de Oro, Philippines
NationalityUnited States American
DenominationRoman Catholicism
Previous postBishop of Cagayan de Oro;
Provincial superior of the Society of Jesus in the Philippines
Alma materWoodstock College in Maryland, U.S.
MottoUt Omnes Unum Sint ("That they all may be one")
Coat of armsJames Hayes's coat of arms
Styles of
James T. G. Hayes
Coat of Arms of James Thomas Gibbons Hayes.svg
Reference styleThe Most Reverend
Spoken styleYour Excellency
Religious styleArchbishop
Ordination history of
James Hayes
History
Episcopal consecration
Consecrated byPatrick Joseph Cardinal Hayes
Date18 June 1933
Episcopal succession
Bishops consecrated by James Hayes as principal consecrator
Clovis Joseph Thibault, P.M.E.11 February 1955
Charles Van den Ouwelant, M.S.C.21 June 1955

BackgroundEdit

Born James Thomas Gibbons Hayes on 11 February 1889 in New York City, New York, United States. He attended the St. Francis Xavier College in New York City and Woodstock College in Maryland. He also studied in Tronchiennes, Belgium.[2]

He started a career as a teacher, teaching at Regis High School in New York City. From 1918 to 1919, he taught the Classics at the Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. He then served as Dean of Discipline at Fordham University from 1923 to 1925.[2]

MinistryEdit

In 1907, Hayes entered the Society of Jesus. On 29 June 1921, he was ordained priest. He moved to the Philippines to do missionary work in 1926. A year after, he already started serving as the Superior of the Jesuits in Mindanao. By 1930, he became Superior of the Jesuits in the Philippines, a position he held until 1933.[2]

On 20 January 1933, the new diocese of Cagayan de Oro was created by Pope Pius XI through the Papal bull "Ad maius religionis".[3][4] Hayes was appointed as the first bishop of the new diocese and ordained as bishop on 16 March 1933 and 18 June 1933 respectively.[1]

On 29 June 1951, Pope Pius XII, through the Papal bull "Quo Phillipina Republica", elevated the Diocese of Cagayan de Oro to an archdiocese and appointed Hayes as the first Archbishop.[5][1]

He retired on 13 October 1970 and was succeeded by Patrick Cronin.[1][6] Consequently, he became Archbishop Emeritus of Cagayan de Oro and titular bishop of Gabii. On 2 December 1970, he resigned as Titular bishop of Gabii. He died on 28 March 1980.

LegacyEdit

In 1928, Hayes founded the San Agustin Parochial School, the predecessor of the present Lourdes College in Cagayan de Oro.[7][8]

He then founded boys school Ateneo de Cagayan, now Xavier University, and became its first President.[9][8]

In 1956, in order to respond to the growing number of priests in the diocese, Hayes founded the San Jose de Mindanao Seminary.[10]

In recognition of Archbishop Hayes' role in the history of Cagayan de Oro, the road traversing from the north wing of the Cagayan de Oro City Hall to the St. John Vianney Theological Seminary was named after him.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Archbishop James Thomas Gibbons Hayes, S.J." Catholic-hierarchy.org. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  2. ^ a b c David, Shavit (1990). The United States in Asia: A Historical Dictionary (9th ed.). Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 224. ISBN 0-313-26788-X.
  3. ^ Msgr. Rey Monsanto, H.P., J.C.D. "Brief History and Profile of the Archdiocese of Cagayan de Oro". Dipolognon.com. Retrieved 22 February 2017.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ "Archdiocese of Cagayan de Oro". Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines. Archived from the original on 29 October 2016. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  5. ^ "Roman Catholic Bishops". SCJ Philippines: Priests of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  6. ^ "Archdiocese of Cagayan de Oro". Catholic-hierarchy.org. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  7. ^ Alfonso, Riain (27 August 2015). "Growing old with Cagayan de Oro". Sun Star Cagayan de Oro. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  8. ^ a b "Archbishop James T. G. Hayes, SJ, DD". Society of Jesus at Manresa. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  9. ^ "Brief History of Xavier University". Xavier University. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  10. ^ "First Batch of Young Seminarians Undergo NCA Leadership Journey". Ninoy & Cory Aquino Center for Leadership. 19 May 2015. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  11. ^ "Xavier Magazine". Xavier University. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2015. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
Catholic Church titles
New creation Archbishop of Cagayan de Oro
1951–1970
Succeeded by
Patrick Cronin
New creation Bishop of Cagayan de Oro
1933–1951
Elevated to archdiocese