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Isabel del Puerto (born Elisabeth von Hortenau: August 7, 1921 in Vienna, Austria – March 13, 2014) was an Austrian-born Mexican-American model, actress, dancer, writer, photojournalist, realtor and entrepreneur, and is the daughter of Charlotte Helene Beer and Alfred Joseph von Hortenau, a cavalry officer in the Austro-Hungarian Army and son of the Archduke Otto Francis of Austria (House of Habsburg-Lorraine). Her parents divorced when she was two years old.

Isabel del Puerto
Isabel del Puerto austro mexican movie.jpg
Studio publicity photo
Born
Elisabeth von Hortenau

(1921-08-07)August 7, 1921
DiedMarch 13, 2014(2014-03-13) (aged 92)
NationalityMexican, American
OccupationModel, actress, dancer, writer, photo-journalist, realtor and entrepreneur
Years active1925–1989
Spouse(s)
  • Juan Hevia del Puerto
    (m. 1940; div. 1947)
  • Hector Mendoza Orozco
    (m. 1951; div. 1956)
  • Joe Oldham Lanett
    (m. 1973; his death 1975)
Children
Parent(s)

Contents

Early careerEdit

 
Isabel del Puerto when she was Isadora Duncan's dance student.

At four she made her stage debut under the guidance of Isadora Duncan and her grandmother Maria Schleinzer who was a vedette at the Vienna Court Opera. She attended the Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia in Rome, Italy, with Alida Valli and other stars of the 1930s.

Movie starEdit

 
Isabel del Puerto, movie star, Golden Age of Mexican cinema

After a short career on Broadway, she went to Mexico, where she modeled for a department store and appeared in 17 films, becoming a star of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema of the 1940s and 1950s.

Photo journalistEdit

After retiring from films, she worked for Time Life magazines and in advertising and public relations in New York.

ChefEdit

Owned and cooked for five gourmet restaurants, among them El Cuchitril, a famous bistro in the Zona Rosa Mexico City.

WriterEdit

She was working on her fifth book (a novel set in the early 1900s). One of her oeuvres is a semi-fictitious biography called My Way, two are detective stories: "The Key" and "The Portrait" and one is a book for children, Sonia, which she hoped to have illustrated and published.

EntrepreneurEdit

She had a real estate license, selling properties in Mexico and the United States.

Later life and deathEdit

In her last years, Isabel resided in San Antonio, Texas, with her three dogs that had been picked up as strays. She actively supported the Democratic Party and headed a charity that was trying to help homeless people and their pets.

On 13 March 2014, she died of an embolism at 6:30 p.m. after a brief hospitalization, surrounded by her son Joe.[1]

FilmographyEdit

Del Puerto has taken part in the following films:

BibliographyEdit

  • García Riera. Emilio, Breve historia del cine mexicano: primer siglo 1897-1987. México. Publisher: Conaculta, Imcine, Universidad de Guadalajara. Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. 1998. 466 pages.
  • García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. 18 tomos. Publisher ERA. Mexico. 1971. http://lccn.loc.gov/74488819
  • Ayala Blanco. Jorge, La aventura del cine mexicano: en la época de oro y después. Mexico. Publisher: ERA. 1979. 422 pages. http://lccn.loc.gov/94202219

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "13 de Marzo, Aniversario luctuoso de la actríz Isabel del Puerto". KhronosDigital.com (in Spanish). March 13, 2019. Retrieved April 29, 2019.
  2. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo III 1945-1948, pages 309–314
  3. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo III 1945-1948, pages 335–336
  4. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo IV 1949-1951, pages 52-53
  5. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo IV 1949-1951, pages 49–51
  6. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo IV 1949-1951, pages 101, 102
  7. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo IV 1949-1951, page 29
  8. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo IV 1949-1951, page 115, 116
  9. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo IV 1949-1951, pages 176–178
  10. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo IV 1949-1951, pages 290, 291
  11. ^ García Riera, Emilio, Historia Documental del Cine Mexicano. Época Sonora. Tomo V 1952-1954, page 233, De Hollywood a México.

External linksEdit