Imamkuli-Khan

Imamkuli-khan the son of Din Muhammad khan (1582-1644) was the third ruler of the Bukhara Khanate, who reigned from 1611 to 1642.

Imamkuli-khan

Imamkuli-khan belonged to Ashtarkhanid dynasty. During the reign of Imamkuli Khan, the Bukhara khanate achieved the most significant power for the entire period of its existence. Despite a successful foreign policy, Imamkuli Khan was unable to completely overcome the internal contradictions in the state associated with the separatism of certain Uzbek tribes. In 1615, Imamkuli Khan sent ambassadors to the descendant of Babur, Emperor Jahangir of India. The letter from Imamkuli Khan was accompanied by an additional letter from the descendant of the famous theologian Khoja Hashim Dagbedi. The ambassadors were greeted friendly and Jahangir sent gifts and a poem to Imamkuli Khan, which he composed himself.[1]

In 1618, the Safavid Shah Abbas I sent ambassadors to Imamkuli Khan with an offer of friendship. In April 1619, the ambassador of Imamkuli Khan was solemnly received by the Safavid shah.[2]

During the reign of Imamkuli Khan, a number of famous architectural masterpieces were built, such as the cathedral mosque and Tillya-Kari madrasah, Sherdor madrasah in Samarkand, Nodir-Divan-Begi madrasah in Bukhara and Samarkand, etc.

The Registan and its three madrasahs. From left to right: Ulugh Beg Madrasah, Tilya-Kori Madrasah and Sher-Dor Madrasah.

In the last years of his life, Imamkuli Khan began to see poorly and in 1642 he renounced the throne in favor of his brother Nadir Muhammad (1642-1645) and went on the Hajj. Imamkuli Khan visited the Safavid Shah, where the local artist Mo'en Mosavver painted his portrait.

Imamkuli Khan died in 1644 in Mecca and was buried in Medina.[3]Ijaz bakhri Astrakhan

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Burton Audrey. The Bukharans. A dynastic, diplomatic and commercial history 1550−1702. — Curzon, 1997. P.143.
  2. ^ Burton Audrey. The Bukharans. A dynastic, diplomatic and commercial history 1550−1702. — Curzon, 1997. P.146.
  3. ^ Ziyayev A. KH. «Silsilat as-salotin» kak istoricheskiy istochnik. Rukopis' dissertatsii na soiskaniye uchenoy stepeni kandidata istoricheskikh nauk. Tashkent, 1990

SourcesEdit

  • Burton Audrey. The Bukharans. A dynastic, diplomatic and commercial history 1550−1702. — Curzon, 1997
  • Robert D. McChesney. Central Asia vi. In the 16th-18th Centuries // Encyclopædia Iranica — Vol. V, Fasc. 2, pp. 176−193
  • R. D. McChesney, Waqf in Central Asia: Four Hundred Years in the History of a Muslim Shrine, 1480—1889. Princeton university press, 1991