Iddin-Sin

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Iddin-Sin (Akkadian: 𒀭𒄿𒋾𒀭𒂗𒍪: DI-ti-n Sîn) was a King (𒈗 Šàr, pronounced Shar)[2] of the Kingdom of Simurrum around 2000 to 1900 BCE. Simurrum was an important city state of the Mesopotamian area, during the period of the Akkadian Empire down to Ur III. The Simurrum Kingdom disappears from records after the Old Babylonian period.[3] According to an inscription (the stela now located in the Sulaymaniyah Museum), Iddin-Sin seems to have been contemporary with the Lullubi king Annubanini.[4][5]

Iddin-Sin
𒀭𒄿𒋾𒀭𒂗𒍪
King of Simurrum
Iddin-Sin
Iddin-Sin, King of Simurrum, armed with a bow and an axe, trampling a foe. Circa 2000 BCE (extracted detail).[1]
Reignc. 2000-1900 BCE
Iddin-Sin relief is located in Iraq
Iddin-Sin relief
Iddin-Sin relief
Original location of the Iddin-Sin relief, near Bitwata, modern Iraq.

Several rulers of the Simurrum Kingdom are known, such as Iddin-Sin and his son Zabazuna.[3] Various inscriptions suggest that they were contemporary with king Ishbi-Erra (1953—c. 1920 BCE).[6] In inscriptions, the name of Iddin-Sin is written 𒀭𒄿𒋾𒀭𒂗𒍪, with one silent honorific (𒀭, "Divine") before the phonological part of the name, 𒄿𒋾𒀭𒂗𒍪, where the second 𒀭 (An) has the value of "n". The last part 𒂗𒍪 was initially En-Zu but is pronounced Sîn, name of the Moon God.[2]

Four inscriptions and a relief of the Simurrum have been identified at Bitwata near Ranya in Iraqi Kurdistan, near the border with Iran, including the large relief now in the Israel Museum, and one from Sarpol-e Zahab.[7][6] It is thought that the design of the relief is derived from the Victory Stele of Naram-Sin, King of the Akkadian Empire (2254-2218 BCE), in which the king is also seen trampling enemies.[8] It is also similar to other reliefs in the area, such as the Anubanini rock relief. The Sarpol-e Zahab relief, representing a beardless warrior with axe, trampling a foe, and inscribed with the name "Zaba(zuna), son of ...", may be the son of Iddin-Sin.[6]

Iddi-Sin is also known from a stele, which he inscribed in the Akkadian language, now in the Sulaymaniyah Museum, Iraq.

A seal showing Iddin-Sin and his son Zabazuna (Akkadian: 𒍝𒁀𒍪𒈾: Za-ba-zu-na), is also known from the Rosen collection.[2]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Shaffer, Aaron; Wasserman, Nathan; Seidl, Ursula. Iddi(n)-Sîn, King of Simurrum: A New Rock-Relief Inscription and a Reverential Seal. pp. 1–52.
  2. ^ a b c Shaffer, Aaron (2003). Iddi(n)-Sîn, King of Simurrum: A New Rock-Relief Inscription and a Reverential Seal. Zeitschrift für Assyoriologie. pp. 32–35.
  3. ^ a b Eidem, Jesper (2001). The Shemshāra Archives 1: The Letters. Kgl. Danske Videnskabernes Selskab. p. 24. ISBN 9788778762450.
  4. ^ Osborne, James F. (2014). Approaching Monumentality in Archaeology. SUNY Press. p. 123. ISBN 9781438453255.
  5. ^ History of Iddin-Sin's stela
  6. ^ a b c d Frayne, Douglas (1990). Old Babylonian Period (2003-1595 BCE). University of Toronto Press. pp. 707 ff. ISBN 9780802058737.
  7. ^ Osborne, James F. (2014). Approaching Monumentality in Archaeology. SUNY Press. p. 120. ISBN 9781438453255.
  8. ^ "Rock relief of Iddin-Sin, King of Simurrum". Europeana.
  9. ^ Osborne, James F. (2014). Approaching Monumentality in Archaeology. SUNY Press. pp. 123–124. ISBN 9781438453255.
  10. ^ Osborne, James F. (2014). Approaching Monumentality in Archaeology. SUNY Press. pp. 123–124. ISBN 9781438453255.
  11. ^ Shaffer, Aaron (2003). Iddi(n)-Sîn, King of Simurrum: A New Rock-Relief Inscription and a Reverential Seal. Zeitschrift für Assyoriologie. p. 3.

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