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In Canada, Government House is a title given to the royal residences of the country's monarch and various viceroys (the governor general, the lieutenant governors, and territorial commissioners[a]). Though not universal, in most cases the title is also the building's sole name; for example, the sovereign's and governor general's principal residence in Ottawa is known as Government House only in formal contexts, being more generally referred to as Rideau Hall. The use of the term Government House is an inherited custom from the British Empire, where there were and are many government houses.

There is currently no government house for the Lieutenant Governors of Ontario (repurposed in 1937 and demolished in 1961), Quebec (destroyed by fire in 1966), Alberta (closed in 1938 and repurchased and repurposed in 1964), or the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories. The Lieutenant Governor of Ontario has a suite within the Ontario Legislative Building.

Present government housesEdit

Building name Residents' positions Location Image Notes
Rideau Hall Monarch of Canada and Governor General of Canada (1867–) Ottawa   Functioning residence.
Citadelle of Quebec Monarch of Canada and Governor General of Canada (1872–) Quebec City   Functioning residence.
Government House Governor of Nova Scotia (circa 1800–1867)
Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia (1867–)
Halifax   Functioning residence.
Government House Governor of New Brunswick (1828–1867)
Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick (1867–1890; 1999–)
Fredericton   Other uses 1896–1988, reoccupied as official residence thereafter, now functioning residence.
Government House Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba (1885–) Winnipeg   Functioning residence.
Government House Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia (1959–) Victoria   Functioning residence.
Fanningbank Governor of Prince Edward Island (1834–1873)
Lieutenant-Governor of Prince Edward Island (1873–)
Charlottetown   Functioning residence.
Government House Lieutenant-Governor of the North-West Territories (1889–1905)
Lieutenant-Governor of Saskatchewan (1905–1945)
Regina   Other uses 1945 – 1984, now offices (but not residence) of Lt-Gov.
Government House Governor of Newfoundland (1827–1949)
Lieutenant-Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador (1949–)
St. John's   Functioning residence.
Taylor House Commissioner of Yukon (2015–) Whitehorse Functioning residence.
Commissioner’s Residence Commissioner of Nunavut (1999–) Iqaluit Functioning residence.

Former government housesEdit

Building name Residents' positions Location Image Notes
Commissioner's Residence[1] Commissioner of Yukon (1898–1953) Dawson City Now a Parks Canada historic site
Chateau St. Louis[2] Governor of Quebec (1760 – 1791)
Lieutenant-Governor of Lower Canada
and Governor-General of British North America (1791 – 1834)
Quebec City   Destroyed by fire, 1834; now site of Château Frontenac
Chateau de Ramezay[2] Lieutenant-Governor of Lower Canada
and Governor-General of British North America (circa 1834)
Montreal   Now a museum.
Government House Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada (1800 – 1813) York Destroyed by explosion, 1813. Site is located with current day Fort York.
Elmsley House Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada (1800 – 1813)
Governor General of the Province of Canada (1849 – 1852, 1856 – 1858)
Toronto   Destroyed by fire, 1862. Now occupied by Metro Hall and Roy Thomson Hall.
Alwington House Governor General of the Province of Canada (1841 – 1844) Kingston Damaged by fire, 1958; demolished, 1959.
Government House Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario (1868 – 1912) Toronto   Sold and demolished, 1912.
Chorley Park Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario (1915 – 1937) Toronto   Other uses, then demolished 1961. Now site of city park.
Spencerwood Lieutenant Governor of Quebec (1870 – 1966) Quebec City   Destroyed by fire in 1966.
Lieutenant Governor of the Northwest Territories (1870 – 1876) Fort Garry Capital moved to Fort Livingstone.
Lieutenant Governor of the Northwest Territories (1876 – 1877) Fort Livingstone Capital moved to Battleford. Now site of Fort Livingstone National Historic Site.
Cary Castle Governor of Vancouver Island (1865 – 1866)
Governor of the United Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia (1868 – 1871)
Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia (1871 – 1903)
Victoria   Destroyed by fire 1903.
Governor of British Columbia (18?? – 1866)
Governor of the United Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia (1866 – 1868)
New Westminster Capital moved to Victoria. Now Royal City Manor.
Government House Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia (190? – 1957) Victoria Destroyed by fire 1957. Government House rebuilt after fire.
Government House Lieutenant-Governor of the Northwest Territories (1883 – 1889) Regina Replaced 1889, demolished 1908. Now site of Luther College.
Government House Lieutenant Governor of Alberta (1913 – 1938) Edmonton   Other uses 1948 – 1964, now the Alberta Government Conference Centre.
58 St. George's Crescent[3] Lieutenant Governor of Alberta (1966 – 2004) Edmonton Demolished 2005.
Government House in Fort Townshend Governor of Newfoundland (1781 – 1831) St. John's
The Monklands Governor General of the Province of Canada (1844 – 1849) Montreal   Capital moved (1849), now high school.
Government House Lieutenant Governor of the Northwest Territories (1878 – 1883) Battleford Capital moved to Regina (1883), building destroyed by fire 2003. Still National historic site with archaeological remains of the destroyed structure.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Though not technically viceroys, the Commissioners of the Canadian territories fill a similar role and their residences are listed here for completion

SourcesEdit

  • Aylmer, L. A.; Wylie, E. A. (1975). "Some Notes on Architecture, Interiors, and Gardens in Quebec 1831". Bulletin of the Association for Preservation Technology. 7 (2): 2–8. doi:10.2307/1493491. JSTOR 1493491.