Fraser T. Smith

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Fraser Thorneycroft-Smith (born 8 February 1971), known professionally as Fraser T. Smith, is an English record producer, songwriter and musician. Some of the singles he collaborated on include Adele's "Set Fire to the Rain", James Morrison's "Broken Strings", Tinchy Stryder's "Number 1" and Taio Cruz's "Break Your Heart".[1] In 2016, Smith teamed up with Stormzy to produce his debut album Gang Signs & Prayer, which won best album at the 2018 Brit Awards. Earlier that year he produced seven tracks on Kano's Made in the Manor album and co produced the debut EP from South London rapper Dave. Smith has also worked with Sam Smith.

Fraser T. Smith
Fraser T Smith Portrait.jpg
Background information
Also known asFuture Utopia
Born (1971-02-08) 8 February 1971 (age 50)
Buckinghamshire, England
Genres
Occupation(s)
  • Record producer
  • songwriter
  • musician
Instruments
  • Guitar
  • bass
  • drums
  • keyboards
Years active1995–present
Labels
  • 70Hz
  • My Audiotonic
Associated actsGorillaz
Websitefrasertsmith.com

Smith released his debut album, 12 Questions, on 30 October 2020. The record is based on a series of 12 questions all born of Smith’s own anxieties about the world, discussing issues such as faith, freedom, race, gender, wealth, equality and ecology. Smith collaborated with Dave, Kano, Ghetts, Bastille, Idris Elba and Stormzy.[2]

On 18 March 2021, Smith was presented with a RSL (Rockschool Ltd) Fellowship.[3]

In August 2021, Dave and Smith were nominated for the Ivors with Apple Music 2021 in the Best Contemporary Song category for "Children of the Internet" (Reference:[4] Dave and Smith subsequently won. This was their third Ivor Novello win in four years. The pair were awarded best contemporary song for Children of the Internet. The song is performed by Future Utopia. This was producer Smith’s new project and features Dave and Es Devlin.[5][6][7][8]

Early life and education

Smith started his career playing guitar in pubs and clubs both as a solo musician and in bands.[9] In 1992, Smith met Rick Wakeman with whom he toured and recorded.[10] Smith then went on to work with Tony Hadley and Adam Wakeman.[11] In the mid-1990s, they formed Jeronimo Road; a progressive rock band. Smith then became involved in playing guitar in studio sessions, performing on over 200 records, including Rui da Silva's number one "Touch Me" and Tim Deluxe's "It Just Won’t Do".[12][13]

Career

In 1999, Smith was introduced to the then-unknown Craig David and spent five years working as his guitarist performing on television and radio, as well as at concerts including the John Lennon Tribute Concert at Radio City Hall in New York, the Tsunami Relief Cardiff at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, and Live 8, London.[14] They remixed songs together under the pseudonym of Treats and have written the songs "World Filled With Love", "6 of 1 Thing", and "Hot Stuff".[15]

In 2011, Smith won the Grammy Award for his work with Adele.[16]

In 2012, Smith was nominated for an Ivor Novello Award for his writing on "Broken Strings".[17] In 2015, Smith was nominated for Album of the Year in the 57th Grammy Awards for his contribution to Sam Smith's album, In the Lonely Hour.[18]

Between 2013 and 2016, Smith worked with long-time collaborator Kano on his album Made in the Manor, which was subsequently shortlisted for the 2016 Mercury Prize[19] and nominated for Album of the Year at the 2017 Brit Awards.[20][21] It went on to win Best Album at the MOBO Awards.[22]

Smith also collaborated with Mexican duo Jesse & Joy on their album Un Besito Más, which was released in December 2015. At the 17th Annual Latin Grammy Awards, the album received the nomination for Album of the Year and won for Best Contemporary Pop Vocal Album.[23]

In 2016, Smith was approached by grime and hip hop artist Stormzy.[24] They spent ten months writing and producing his debut album, Gang Signs & Prayer, released independently through #Merky Records on 24 February 2017. The album was supported by the lead single "Big for Your Boots".

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Smith produced the Live Lounge Allstars' charity version of the Foo Fighters' "Times Like These", featuring dozens of musicians recorded from their homes.[25]

In 2018, Dave and Smith were nominated for and won an Ivor Novello Award for the track "Question Time".[26]

In 2020, Dave and Smith were nominated for and won an Ivor Novello Award for the track "Black".[27]

Discography

Studio albums

As Future Utopia

List of studio albums, with selected chart positions
Title Album details
12 Questions

Awards and nominations

Award show Year Category Work Result Ref(s)
Grammy Awards 2012 Album of the Year 21 (Adele) Won [29]
2015 Album of the Year In the Lonely Hour (Sam Smith) Nominated

References

  1. ^ "— The Manifesto". Themanifesto.co. 26 March 2014. Archived from the original on 31 May 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  2. ^ "Stewart, Rev. Hugh Fraser, (1863–23 Jan. 1948), Emeritus Reader in French; Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge; Fellow of Eton College; Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur", Who Was Who, Oxford University Press, 1 December 2007, retrieved 26 October 2021
  3. ^ "RSL Honorary Fellowship: Fraser T Smith". RSL Awards. 18 March 2021. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  4. ^ "Nominations announced for The Ivors with Apple Music 2021". The Ivors Academy. 10 August 2021. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  5. ^ "Fraser T Smith, Dave & Es Devlin's "Children Of The Internet" Wins 2021 Ivor Novello For Best Contemporary Song". GRM Daily. 21 September 2021. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  6. ^ "Celeste, Obongjayar, Dave and Fraser T Smith win at Ivor Novello awards 2021". The Line of Best Fit. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  7. ^ Edmonds, Lizzie (21 September 2021). "Harry Styles among first-time winners at Ivor Novello Awards". www.standard.co.uk. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  8. ^ "The Ivors 2021: Full Winners List". headlinermagazine.net. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  9. ^ "Secrets of the Mix Engineers: Fraser T Smith". Soundonsound.com. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  10. ^ "A&R, Record Label / Company, Music Publishing, Artist Manager and Music Industry Directory". Hitquarters.com. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  11. ^ "Explore Multimedia". Explore Multimedia. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  12. ^ Cassandra (2 April 2001). "Release "Touch Me" by Rui da Silva feat. Cassandra". MusicBrainz. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  13. ^ "Tim Deluxe Featuring Sam Obernik - It Just Won't Do (CD) at Discogs". Discogs.com. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  14. ^ "Fraser Smith - From Craig David to Plan B". Gforce Software. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  15. ^ "Songs written by Fraser T. Smith | SecondHandSongs". secondhandsongs.com. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  16. ^ "Fraser T. Smith". GRAMMY.com. 23 November 2020. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  17. ^ CMU Editorial (21 April 2010). "Ivor Novello noms out". Complete Music Update. 3CM UnLimited.
  18. ^ "Grammy Awards 2015: The Complete Winners List". Rolling Stone.
  19. ^ "Mercury Prize 2016: David Bowie gets posthumous nomination". BBC. Retrieved 5 August 2016.
  20. ^ "Brit Awards 2017: The nominations". BBC News. 14 January 2017. Retrieved 3 February 2017.
  21. ^ "BRIT Awards 2017 full winners list". NME. 22 February 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  22. ^ "Kano named Best Album at 2016 Mobo Awards". ITV News. 4 November 2016.
  23. ^ "Here Is the Complete List of Nominees for the 2017 Grammys". Billboard. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  24. ^ Savage, Mark (1 March 2018). "Meet the man Stormzy hugged at the Brits" – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  25. ^ "Fraser T Smith: How I brought 24 musicians together during lockdown for Radio 1's first Number One". BBC. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  26. ^ "Ivor Novello Awards: Rapper Dave wins for political anthem Question Time". BBC News. 31 May 2018. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  27. ^ "Ivor Novello Awards: Rapper Dave wins for political anthem Question Time". BBC News. 31 May 2018. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  28. ^ "Fraser T Smith announces '12 Questions' album featuring Stormzy, Dave, Idris Elba and many more". NME. 13 August 2020. Retrieved 30 October 2020.
  29. ^ "Fraser T. Smith". grammy.com. The Recording Academy. Retrieved 10 September 2021.

External links