International Association for Cryptologic Research

  (Redirected from Fast Software Encryption)

The International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) is a non-profit scientific organization whose purpose is to further research in cryptology and related fields. The IACR was organized at the initiative of David Chaum at the CRYPTO '82 conference.[1]

International Association for Cryptologic Research
International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) logo.png
Formation1982
FounderDavid Chaum
Membership
1702 (in 2013)
President
Christian Cachin
Main organ
Journal of Cryptology, IACR conferences and workshops, Cryptology ePrint Archive
Websitewww.iacr.org

ActivitiesEdit

The IACR organizes and sponsors three annual flagship conferences, four annual workshops in specific sub-areas, and one symposium: [2]

  • Crypto (flagship)
  • Eurocrypt (flagship)
  • Asiacrypt (flagship)
  • Fast Software Encryption (FSE)
  • Public Key Cryptography (PKC)
  • Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems (CHES)
  • Theory of Cryptography (TCC)
  • Real World Crypto Symposium (RWC)

Several other conferences and workshops are held in cooperation with the IACR. Starting in 2015, selected summer schools will be officially sponsored by the IACR. CRYPTO '83 was the first conference officially sponsored by the IACR.

The IACR publishes the Journal of Cryptology, in addition to the proceedings of its conference and workshops. The IACR also maintains the Cryptology ePrint Archive, an online repository of cryptologic research papers aimed at providing rapid dissemination of results. [3]

AsiacryptEdit

Asiacrypt (also ASIACRYPT) is an international conference for cryptography research. The full name of the conference is currently International Conference on the Theory and Application of Cryptology and Information Security, though this has varied over time. Asiacrypt is a conference sponsored by the IACR since 2000, and is one of its three flagship conferences. Asiacrypt is now held annually in November or December at various locations throughout Asia and Australia.

Initially, the Asiacrypt conferences were called AUSCRYPT, as the first one was held in Sydney, Australia in 1990, and only later did the community decide that the conference should be held in locations throughout Asia. The first conference to be called "Asiacrypt" was held in 1991 in Fujiyoshida, Japan.

Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded SystemsEdit

Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems (CHES) is a conference for cryptography research[4], focusing on the implementation of cryptographic algorithm. The two general areas treated are the efficient and the secure implementation of algorithms. Related topics such as random number generators, physical unclonable function or special-purpose cryptanalytical machines are also commonly covered at the workshop. It was first held in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1999 at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI). It was founded by Çetin Kaya Koç and Christof Paar. CHES 2000 was also held at WPI; after that, the conference has been held at various locations worldwide. Since 2009, the location of CHES rotates between the three continents Europe, North America and Asia. The past locations were, in chronological order, Paris, San Francisco, Cologne, Boston, Edinburgh, Yokohama, Vienna, Washington, D.C., Lausanne, Santa Barbara, Nara, Leuven, Santa Barbara, Busan, Saint-Malo and again Santa Barbara.[5] In the last few years[when?], CHES had around 400 participants.

EurocryptEdit

Eurocrypt (or EUROCRYPT) is a conference for cryptography research. The full name of the conference is now the Annual International Conference on the Theory and Applications of Cryptographic Techniques. Eurocrypt is one of the IACR flagship conferences, along with CRYPTO and ASIACRYPT.

Eurocrypt is held annually in the spring in various locations throughout Europe. The first workshop in the series of conferences that became known as Eurocrypt was held in 1982. In 1984, the name "Eurocrypt" was first used. Generally, there have been published proceedings including all papers at the conference every year, with two exceptions; in 1983, no proceedings was produced, and in 1986, the proceedings contained only abstracts. Springer has published all the official proceedings, first as part of Advances in Cryptology in the Lecture Notes in Computer Science series.

Fast Software EncryptionEdit

Fast Software Encryption, often abbreviated FSE, is a workshop for cryptography research, focused on symmetric-key cryptography with an emphasis on fast, practical techniques, as opposed to theory. Though "encryption" is part of the conference title, it is not limited to encryption research; research on other symmetric techniques such as message authentication codes and hash functions is often presented there. FSE has been an IACR workshop since 2002, though the first FSE workshop was held in 1993. FSE is held annually in various locations worldwide, mostly in Europe. The dates of the workshop have varied over the years, but recently, it has been held in February.

Public Key CryptographyEdit

PKC or Public-Key Cryptography is the short name of the International Workshop on Theory and Practice in Public Key Cryptography (modified as International Conference on Theory and Practice in Public Key Cryptography since 2006).

Theory of CryptographyEdit

The Theory of Cryptography Conference, often abbreviated TCC, is an annual conference for theoretical cryptography research.[6] It was first held in 2004 at MIT, and was also held at MIT in 2005, both times in February. TCC became an IACR-sponsored workshop in 2006. The founding steering committee consists of Mihir Bellare, Ivan Damgard, Oded Goldreich, Shafi Goldwasser, Johan Hastad, Russell Impagliazzo, Ueli Maurer, Silvio Micali, Moni Naor, and Tatsuaki Okamoto.

The importance of the theoretical study of Cryptography is widely recognized by now. This area has contributed much to the practice of cryptography and secure systems as well as to the theory of computation at large.

The needs of the theoretical cryptography (TC) community are best understood in relation to the two communities between which it resides: the Theory of Computation (TOC) community and the Cryptography/Security community. All three communities have grown in volume in recent years. This increase in volume makes the hosting of TC by the existing TOC and Crypto conferences quite problematic. Furthermore, the perspectives of TOC and Crypto on TC do not necessarily fit the internal perspective of TC and the interests of TC. All these indicate a value in the establishment of an independent specialized conference. A dedicated conference not only provides opportunities for research dissemination and interaction, but helps shape the field, give it a recognizable identity, and communicate its message.

Real World Crypto SymposiumEdit

The Real World Crypto Symposium is a conference for applied cryptography research, which was started in 2012 by Kenny Paterson and Nigel Smart. The winner of the Levchin Prize is announced at RWC.[7]

Announcements made at the symposium include the first known chosen prefix attack on SHA-1[8][9] and the inclusion of end-to-end encryption in Facebook Messenger.[10]. Also, the introduction of the E4 chip took place at RWC.[11]. Flaws in messaging apps such as WhatsApp were also presented there.[12]

 
CRYPTO 2003 conference reception.

International Cryptology ConferenceEdit

CRYPTO, the International Cryptology Conference, is an academic conference on all aspects of cryptography and cryptanalysis. It is held yearly in August in Santa Barbara, California at the University of California, Santa Barbara.[13]

The first CRYPTO was held in 1981.[14] It was the first major conference on cryptology and was all the more important because relations between government, industry and academia were rather tense. Encryption was considered a very sensitive subject and the coming together of delegates from different countries was unheard-of at the time. The initiative for the formation of the IACR came during CRYPTO '82, and CRYPTO '83 was the first IACR sponsored conference.

FellowsEdit

The IACR Fellows Program (FIACR) has been established as an honor to bestow upon its exceptional members. There are currently 68 IACR Fellows.[15]

Year awarded Fellow Citation
Adi Shamir 2004 For breakthrough research contributions and for sustained leadership in the technical, educational, and commercial development of cryptology and security.
Ron Rivest 2004 For breakthrough research contributions and for sustained leadership in the technical, educational, and commercial development of cryptology and security.
Whitfield Diffie 2004 For the invention of public-key cryptography.
Don Coppersmith 2004 For numerous foundational and highly influential contributions to the theory and practice of cryptosystem design and analysis.
David Chaum 2004 For numerous seminal contributions to security and privacy research and for visionary leadership in the role of IACR founder.
Tom Berson 2004 For visionary and essential service to the IACR and for numerous valuable contributions to the technical, social, and commercial development of cryptology and security.
Jacques Stern 2005 For fundamental contributions to the design and analysis of public-key cryptosystems and for sustained educational leadership in cryptology.
Gustavus Simmons 2005 For pioneering research in information integrity, information theory, and secure protocols and for substantial contributions to the formation of the IACR.
Kevin McCurley 2005 For exemplary service as IACR President and essential leadership in IACR information systems.
Martin Hellman 2006 For the invention of public-key cryptography and for pioneering open research in cryptology.
Gilles Brassard 2006 For breakthrough research in quantum cryptography and cryptographic protocols and for essential services to the community in furthering publication of cryptologic research.
Silvio Micali 2007 For fundamental pioneering contributions to the scientific foundations of cryptography and for sustained leadership in cryptographic education.
Hideki Imai 2007 For outstanding contributions to cryptologic research and education, and for the establishment and promotion of international cryptologic forums in Asia and elsewhere.
Shafi Goldwasser 2007 For fundamental pioneering contributions to the scientific foundations of cryptography and for sustained leadership in cryptographic education.
Moni Naor 2008 For fundamental contributions to the scientific foundations of cryptography, and for sustained educational leadership in cryptology.
Ralph Merkle 2008 For the invention of public-key cryptography.
Ueli Maurer 2008 For fundamental contributions to information-theoretic cryptography, service to the IACR, and sustained educational leadership in cryptology.
Michael O. Rabin 2009 For pioneering fundamental contributions to modern cryptography.
James Massey 2009 For pioneering contributions to cipher design and analysis, and for sustained contributions to the IACR and to cryptologic education.
Arjen Lenstra 2009 For basic contributions to number theoretic cryptanalysis and for service to the IACR.
Oded Goldreich 2009 For fundamental pioneering contributions to the scientific foundations of cryptography and for sustained leadership in cryptographic education.
George Blakley 2009 For the invention of general secret sharing schemes and for valuable service to the cryptologic community.
Andrew Yao 2010 For fundamental contributions to the foundations of cryptography and its relations to complexity theory.
Jean-Jacques Quisquater 2010 For basic contributions to cryptographic hardware and to cryptologic education and for service to the IACR.
Yvo G. Desmedt 2010 For basic contributions to cryptographic design and for service to the IACR.
Ivan Damgård 2010 For fundamental contributions to cryptography, for sustained educational leadership in cryptography, and for service to the IACR.
Andrew Clark 2010 For exemplary service as board member and president of IACR, and for contributions to the preservation of cryptology's heritage.
Scott Vanstone 2011 For essential work on the deployment of Elliptic Curve Cryptography, sustained educational leadership in applied cryptology, and service to the IACR.
Richard Schroeppel 2011 For pioneering and analysing the sieving technique underlying subexponential factoring and discrete logarithm methods.
Charles Rackoff 2011 pioneering contributions to the scientific foundations of cryptology and for sustained leadership in cryptographic education.
David Kahn 2011 For being cryptography's foremost historian and a co-founder of the IACR.
Jennifer Seberry 2012 For outstanding contributions to cryptologic research and education, and for fostering the Australian research community.
Claus P. Schnorr 2012 For fundamental contributions to the design and analysis of cryptographic systems.
Phillip Rogaway 2012 For fundamental contributions to the theory and practice of cryptography and for educational leadership in cryptography.
Andrew Odlyzko 2012 For pioneering contributions to cryptography and for service to the IACR.
Manuel Blum 2012 For pioneering modern cryptography and for sustained contributions to cryptographic education.
Eli Biham 2012 For fundamental contributions to cryptanalysis, including the co-invention of differential cryptanalysis.
Mihir Bellare 2012 For fundamental contributions to the theory and practice of cryptography and for educational leadership in cryptography.
Rafail Ostrovsky 2013 For numerous contributions to the scientific foundations of cryptography and for sustained educational leadership in cryptography.
Victor S. Miller 2013 For contributions to elliptic curve cryptography, pairing based cryptography, and the LZW compression algorithm.
Hugo Krawczyk 2013 For fundamental contributions to cryptography and technology transfer of cryptographic research results to secure Internet protocols.
Lars Ramkilde Knudsen 2013 For fundamental contributions to the design and cryptanalysis of symmetric primitives and for service to the IACR.
Claude Crépeau 2013 For pioneering work on the foundation of oblivious transfer, two- and multiparty protocols, information-theoretic security, and quantum cryptography.
Ronald Cramer 2013 For fundamental contributions to cryptography, for sustained educational leadership in cryptography, and for service to the IACR.
Dan Boneh 2013 For opening up new areas in cryptography and computer security, for innovative educational initiatives in cryptography, and for service to the IACR.
Moti Yung 2014 For fundamental and innovative contributions to cryptography and its application to the security and privacy of real world systems.
Eyal Kushilevitz 2014 For fundamental contributions to cryptography, and sustained educational leadership.
Antoine Joux 2014 For contributions to the science of cryptology, the co-invention of Pairing-Based Cryptography, and outstanding work on cryptanalysis of hash functions and discrete logarithms.
Ran Canetti 2014 For numerous contributions to the foundations of cryptography, most importantly his introduction and development of the Universal Composability Framework.
Tal Rabin 2015 For contributions to the theory of multiparty computation, encryption, and signatures, and for leadership on cryptographic research within industry.
Bart Preneel 2015 For outstanding service to the IACR, for numerous research contributions, for sustained educational leadership, and for effectively leading the European cryptologic research community.
Tatsuaki Okamoto 2015 For theoretical and practical contributions to areas including encryption, signatures, identification, elliptic-curve cryptosystems, zero knowledge, and electronic cash, and for service to the IACR.
Kaisa Nyberg 2015 For fundamental contributions to the design and analysis of block ciphers, for contributions to mobile phone security, and for service to the IACR.
Joe Kilian 2015 For ingenious contributions to areas including primality testing, secure computation, oblivious transfer, interactive proofs, zero knowledge, and watermarking.
Ernie Brickell 2015 For founding the Journal of Cryptology, for industrial implementations supporting privacy, and for contributions to secret sharing, attestation, and the cryptanalysis of knapsack-based cryptosystems.
Nigel Smart 2016 For essential contributions to the theory and practice of real world cryptography and outstanding service to the IACR.
Victor Shoup 2016 For fundamental contributions to public-key cryptography and cryptographic security proofs, and for educational leadership.
Shai Halevi 2016 For numerous groundbreaking contributions spanning the theory and practice of cryptography, and for outstanding service to the IACR.
Ed Dawson 2016 For visionary service to the IACR and fostering the Asian-Pacific cryptographic community, and for important scientific contributions.
Kenny Paterson 2017 For research and service contributions spanning theory and practice, and improving the security of widely deployed protocols.
Christof Paar 2017 For co-founding CHES, service to the IACR, and for important contributions to secure and efficient implementation of cryptography.
Kwangjo Kim 2017 For cryptographic design, education, and leadership, and for exemplary service to IACR and the Asia-Pacific cryptographic community.
Louis Guillou 2017 For visionary actions that brought cryptography and smart cards to the real world, and for essential contributions to cryptographic standards.
Jan Camenisch 2017 For contributions to the theory and practice of privacy-preserving protocols and impact on government policy and industry.
Stafford Tavares 2018 For significant contributions to the design and analysis of block ciphers, for founding the SAC conference, and for service to the IACR.
Paul Kocher 2018 For fundamental contributions to the study of side-channel attacks and countermeasures, cryptography in practice, and for service to the IACR.
Yuval Ishai 2018 For essential contributions to the theory of cryptographic protocols, low-complexity cryptography, and other foundations of cryptography.
Juan Garay 2018 For fundamental contributions at the interface of cryptography and distributed computing, and for service to the cryptographic research community.
Jonathan Katz 2019 For broad contributions, especially in public-key encryption and cryptographic protocols, and for dedication to service and education.
Kaoru Kurosawa 2019 For seminal contributions spanning anonymity, e-voting, and public-key cryptography, and for service to the Japanese and international communities.
Daniele Micciancio 2019 For pioneering work on lattice-based cryptography and the complexity of lattice problems, and for service to the IACR.
Vincent Rijmen 2019 For co-designing AES, contributions to the design and cryptanalysis of symmetric primitives, and service to the IACR.
Amit Sahai 2019 For fundamental contributions, including to secure computation, zero knowledge, and functional encryption, and for service to the IACR.
Xiaoyun Wang 2019 For essential contributions to the cryptanalysis and design of hash functions, and for service to the IACR.

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sonia Fernandez: The People Behind the Code. The UCSB Current. 21 August 2014
  2. ^ IACR Conferences
  3. ^ IACR Publications
  4. ^ Schwabe, Peter. "CHES". ches.iacr.org. Retrieved 2020-04-06.
  5. ^ Schwabe, Peter. "CHES – Former CHES". ches.iacr.org. Retrieved 2020-04-06.
  6. ^ "Theory of Cryptography Conference (TCC)". www.iacr.org. Retrieved 2020-04-06.
  7. ^ "The Levchin Prize for Real-World Cryptography". rwc.iacr.org. Retrieved 2020-03-28.
  8. ^ at 22:21, Thomas Claburn in San Francisco 8 Jan 2020. "Hash snag: Security shamans shame SHA-1 standard, confirm crucial collisions citing circa $45k chip cost". www.theregister.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  9. ^ Goodin, Dan (2020-01-07). "PGP keys, software security, and much more threatened by new SHA1 exploit". Ars Technica. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  10. ^ "Facebook Says Encrypting Messenger by Default Will Take Years". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  11. ^ "An Open Source Effort to Encrypt the Internet of Things". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  12. ^ "WhatsApp Flaws Could Allow Snoops to Slide Into Group Chats". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved 2020-03-19.
  13. ^ "Crypto Conferences". www.iacr.org. Retrieved 2020-04-12.
  14. ^ "Annual International Cryptology Conference (CRYPTO)". dblp.org. dblp computer science bibliography. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  15. ^ IACR Fellows