Eastern Hockey League (1978–1981)

  (Redirected from Eastern Hockey League (1978-1981))

The Eastern Hockey League began operation in 1978 as the Northeastern Hockey League, filling the void in the former territory of the Eastern Hockey League.

Eastern Hockey League
SportIce hockey
Founded1978
Ceased1981
No. of teams6
CountryUnited States
Last
champion(s)
Erie Blades (1980–81)
Most titlesErie Blades (3), (1978–79; 1979–80; 1980–81)

Bill Beagan was named commissioner of the Northeastern Hockey League on June 14, 1979, to replace Jack Timmins who resigned.[1] The league was rebranded as the Eastern Hockey League, which Beagan oversaw for two seasons until 1981.[2] The league was not successful and after an owners' meeting on July 19, 1981, it was decided to fold the league.[3]

Two of the teams – Baltimore Clippers and the Salem Raiders – joined the Atlantic Coast Hockey League in 1981. One team – the Erie Blades – joined the American Hockey League that same season. The remaining teams folded with the league and ceased operations.[citation needed]

TeamsEdit

  • Baltimore Clippers (1979–81, joined the Atlantic Coast Hockey League)
  • Erie Blades (1978–81, joined the American Hockey League in 1981–82 and were later merged with the Baltimore Skipjacks. The Erie Golden Blades joined the Atlantic Coast Hockey League in 1982)
  • Jersey/Hampton Aces (1978–81; Franchise became defunct when the Eastern Hockey League folded)
  • Johnstown Red Wings (1978–80; Franchise ceased operations after the 1979–80 season)
  • New Hampshire/Cape Cod Freedoms (1978–79, Franchise started season in New Hampshire before moving to Cape Cod midseason. Franchise ceased operations after 1978–79 season)
  • Richmond Rifles (1979–81, franchise became defunct when the Eastern Hockey League folded)
  • Salem Raiders (1980–81, joined the Atlantic Coast Hockey League in 1981)
  • Syracuse Hornets (1980–81, franchise folded after ten games, going 0–9–1)
  • Utica Mohawks (1978–80, franchise moved to Salem, VA and became the Salem Raiders in 1980–81)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Named commissioner". Brandon Sun. Brandon, Manitoba. June 14, 1979. p. 8. 
  2. ^ Bacon, John U. (2001). Blue Ice: The Story of Michigan Hockey. Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press. p. 285. ISBN 0-472-09781-4 – via Google Books.
  3. ^ HockeyLeagueHistory.com: Eastern Hockey League (1979–81)