John Craigie (musician)

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John Craigie (born June 15, 1980) is an American singer-songwriter and storyteller.[1] Hailed as a "Modern-Day Troubadour" in the style of Woody Guthrie,[2] Craigie's comedic storytelling style has been compared to Mitch Hedberg, while his music and commitment to living on the road has drawn comparisons to Guthrie, Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Pete Seeger.[1]

John Craigie
John Craigie in 2021
John Craigie in 2021
Background information
Born (1980-06-15) June 15, 1980 (age 41)
OriginLos Angeles, California, United States
GenresFolk, Americana, Storytelling, Comedy
InstrumentsVocals, guitar, harmonica, banjo, ukulele
Years active2003–present
Associated actsJack Johnson, Gregory Alan Isakov, Shook Twins, Todd Snider, Rainbow Girls
Websitewww.johncraigiemusic.com

He has performed with or opened for Jack Johnson, Gregory Alan Isakov, Todd Snider, Paul Thorn, James McMurtry, Shawn Colvin, Sean Hayes, Nicki Bluhm, Aoife O'Donovan, ALO, Shook Twins, Rainbow Girls, Avett Brothers, and Trampled by Turtles.[3][citation needed]

Early lifeEdit

John Craigie was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. He is the grandson of U.S. Air Force general Laurence Craigie. He attended college at UC Santa Cruz in Northern California, where he graduated with a degree in mathematics. In Santa Cruz he began performing live music in local venues and house parties, first as lead singer and guitarist in a psychedelic rock band, "Pond Rock", then solo as a folk singer-songwriter and storyteller.[4] He self-released several albums of songs in this period before his first major studio album, 2009's Montana Tale.[5]

Music careerEdit

Craigie is best known for his live performances which blend folk songwriting with comedic storytelling.[6] His 2016 live album, Capricorn In Retrograde… Just Kidding… Live in Portland, wound up on Jack Johnson's car stereo on a drive up the California coast, prompting Johnson to ask Craigie to open for him on 11 dates of his 2017 national Summer tour.[7][8] Throughout the tour, Johnson brought Craigie on stage during his set to co-perform Craigie's song, "I Wrote Mr. Tambourine Man"; the pair released a single of the song, recorded live at The Greek Theatre in Berkeley, California.[8]

Craigie has released seven studio albums, two live albums, and two cover albums. His album No Rain, No Rose, released in 2017, was recorded in his Portland-home living room, and features Gregory Alan Isakov and Shook Twins.[7][9] 2020's Asterisk The Universe features Rainbow Girls and was recorded with friends in a Northern California cabin.[10]

DiscographyEdit

Studio albumsEdit

Live albumsEdit

Cover albumsEdit

  • Leave the Fire Behind (cover versions of 1990s alternative rock songs, 2010)[11]
  • Paper Airplane (cover versions of Led Zeppelin songs, 2012)[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Pierce, Jacob (January 8, 2013). "John Craigie's Traveling Musical Adventure". Santa Cruz.com. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. Retrieved April 6, 2013.
  2. ^ Dicks, Brett Lee (April 9, 2009). "John Craigie's Travelin' Songs". The Santa Barbara Independent. Retrieved May 21, 2010.
  3. ^ "Step Inside This House » Blog Archive » One to Watch: John Craigie". www.gregrobson.net. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  4. ^ Eisert, Jason (July 2, 2013). "INTERROGATION: JOHN CRAIGIE". anchoragepress.com. Archived from the original on August 11, 2014.
  5. ^ "AllMusic Discography for John Craigie". AllMusic. Retrieved September 4, 2021.
  6. ^ Brewer, Jude. "Endings – Storytellers Telling Stories".
  7. ^ a b "Live Sessions: John Craigie". NPR Music. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  8. ^ a b "Jack Johnson & John Craigie Share Live Version Of 'I Wrote Mr. Tambourine Man' to Help Save the Earth: Premiere". Billboard. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  9. ^ "John Craigie Isn't Afraid of Intimacy". Willamette Week (in American English). Retrieved August 21, 2018.
  10. ^ "John Craigie Has A Knack For Spinning Stories". NPR. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  11. ^ a b "Folk singer Craigie creates travelogue through music". The Spokesman-Review. April 18, 2014. Retrieved April 1, 2019.

External linksEdit