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Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)

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"Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)" is a song originally performed by The Gap Band in 1980 and written by member Charlie Wilson and producer Lonnie Simmons. In 1981, it peaked at number eighty-four on the Billboard Hot 100, and it was a number one hit on the R&B charts.[1] Billboard magazine ranked it as the 12th biggest R&B single of 1981.

"Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)"
Burn Rubber on Me.jpg
Single by The Gap Band
from the album The Gap Band III
A-side "Yearning for Your Love"
B-side Nothing Comes to Sleepers"
"Baby Baba Boogie"
"Humpin'
Released 1980
Recorded 1980
Genre Funk
Length 4:11
Label Mercury
Songwriter(s) Charlie Wilson, Lonnie Simmons, Rudy Taylor
The Gap Band singles chronology
"Party Lights"
(1980)
"Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)"
(1980)
"Humpin'"
(1981)
"Party Lights"
(1980)
"'Burn Rubber on Me'"
(1980)
"Humpin'"
(1981)

The song's lyrics refer to abandonment by a lover. The phrase "Burn Rubber on Me" itself refers to said woman driving off while her lover is away.[2] The narrative is continued in "Early in the Morning".

A later single released, featuring "Humpin'" on the B-side, scored a #19 appearance on the dance charts.[3]

Pop singer George Michael sampled the song for his 1997 single "Star People '97".

ReleasesEdit

All releases are in the U.S. unless indicated:

  • 7" single
  • 12" single
  • 7" with "Nothing Comes to Sleepers" on the B-side
  • 7" with "Baby Baba Boogie" from 1979's The Gap Band on the B-side
  • 7" with "Yearning for Your Love" on the A-side
  • Album, "Gap Band III" (1980), along with a radio edit and 8 other songs

All the releases can be checked at Discogs[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 223. 
  2. ^ Lyrics
  3. ^ Chart History
  4. ^ Discogs Archived April 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
Preceded by
"Fantastic Voyage" by Lakeside
Billboard's Hot Soul Singles number one single
February 14–21, 1981
Succeeded by
"Don't Stop the Music" by Yarbrough and Peoples