Boqi Muhammad Khan

Boqi Muhammad Khan the son of jani Muhammad/jani bek was a leader of the Ashtarkhanid (Toqay-Timurid, Janid) dynasty in the Khanate of Bukhara from 1599–1605 AD.[1]

After Jani-Muhammad was elected Khan in 1599, Boqi Muhammad was the de facto ruler of the Bukhara Khanate.

In the winter of 1601-02, Boqi Muhammad also faced the uprising of Abbas and Rahmankuli. In the struggle for Badakhshan at the end of March 1603, Boqi Muhammad won. When Jani-Mohammad died, Boqi Muhammad was declared khan.[2]

Boqi Muhammad ascended the throne with the title of khan on November 17, 1603. He made Bukhara his capital, but he spent more time in Samarkand. [3]

Boqi Muhammad Khan died in 1605.

During his short reign, he established the legitimacy of the Tokay-Timurids in Transoxania and Balkh, strengthened the system of appanage possessions, and repulsed two external attacks on his state. Boqi Muhammad Khan was engaged in great charitable activities. He built mosques and madrasahs in Bukhara, a mosque (id-gāh), a park and audience hall (kurinish-hona) in Samarkand. [4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Welcome to Encyclopaedia Iranica".
  2. ^ "History of civilizations of Central Asia, v. 5: Development in contrast, from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century, p. 629-657, illus". Unesdoc.unesco.org.
  3. ^ McChesney, R. D. "The reforms" of Baqi Muhammad Khan in Central Asiatic Journal 24, no. 1/2 (1980): 78.
  4. ^ Robert D. McChesney. Central Asia vi. In the 16th-18th Centuries // Encyclopædia Iranica — Vol. V, Fasc. 2, pp. 176−193

SourcesEdit

  • Burton Audrey. The Bukharans. A dynastic, diplomatic and commercial history 1550−1702. — Curzon, 1997
  • Robert D. McChesney. Central Asia vi. In the 16th-18th Centuries // Encyclopædia Iranica — Vol. V, Fasc. 2, pp. 176−193
  • R. D. McChesney, Waqf in Central Asia: Four Hundred Years in the History of a Muslim Shrine, 1480—1889. Princeton university press, 1991