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In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, Baphomet (/ˈbæfəmɛt/ BAF-ə-met)[1] is a demon lord who rules a layer of the Abyss called the Endless Maze. He is the Prince of Beasts and the Demon Lord of Minotaurs.

Baphomet
Dungeons & Dragons character
Baphomet.JPG
First appearanceThe Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth (1982)
Created byGary Gygax
Information
RaceDemon lord
GenderMale
TitlePrince of Beasts, Demon Lord of Minotaurs, the Trampler, the Horned King
AlignmentChaotic Evil
HomeAbyss
PortfolioMinotaurs, Beasts, Vengeance

Contents

Publication historyEdit

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 1st edition (1977-1988)Edit

Baphomet first appears in module The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth (1982),[2] and then appears in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983),[3] under the demon entry.

Baphomet makes another appearance in the module The Throne of Bloodstone (1988).[4]

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd edition (1989-1999)Edit

Baphomet was detailed as a deity in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[5]

Baphomet's role among the giant deities of the Forgotten Realms campaign setting is described in detail in Giantcraft (1995).[6]

His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[7]

Dungeons & Dragons 3.0 edition (2000-2002)Edit

Baphomet appeared, again as a demon lord, in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[8]

Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 edition (2003-2007)Edit

Baphomet is fully detailed in Dragon, in issue #341 (March 2006) in the "Demonomicon of Iggwilv" feature.[9]

Baphomet was featured in the Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[10]

Dungeons & Dragons 4th edition (2008-)Edit

Baphomet is one of the few demon lords mentioned in the 4th edition Monster Manual (2008).[11]

His game-statistics, and brief biography, can be found in The Manual of the Planes.

Baphomet is fully detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #369 (November 2008) in the "Demonomicon of Iggwilv" feature.[12]

DescriptionEdit

Baphomet has the appearance of a 12' tall humanoid with a bull's head, a bovine tail, and broad, stubby hands and feet. His body is covered with coarse black hair. His horns curve downward and outward. He wields a giant bardiche. Baphomet can spit out gouts of unholy water.

RelationshipsEdit

Baphomet hates Yeenoghu, and the two are bitter enemies. The two have been warring against each other for as long as they themselves could remember, and both have forgotten the origin of their feud. Baphomet's other enemies include the Demon Queen of Harpies Ardat.

Baphomet has an unknown relationship with Pale Night, who shares his layer.

RealmEdit

Baphomet's realm of the Endless Maze (in Gary Gygax's Gord novels, Baphomet's realm is called Shubgottia) is the 600th layer of the Abyss, supposedly infinite in size. Here, Baphomet dwells in his palace, the Lyktion, and spend his time creating various new demonic breeds in his infamous Tower of Science. Some of his more successful creations are the goristroi, the bulezaus, the ghours, and more recently, the feral ankashars.

DogmaEdit

Baphomet is the embodiment of savagery, an insidious force that worms its way into the heart of his followers to deceive them into embracing brutality.

WorshippersEdit

Baphomet has a multitude of minotaur, ogre, and giant followers and minions. He is also served by ghour demons, a race of demons resembling burly, hairless minotaurs which command troops of these mortal minions. He seeks to use them to further his schemes, notably to gain the upper hand in his battles against Yeenoghu. A multitude of other twisted creatures revere Baphomet as well, some becoming his thralls, and if they pleased their bestial patron, they would be granted rulership of a portion of the Endless Maze. Those who displease Baphomet are eaten.

HistoryEdit

It is suggested that Baphomet started his existence as a mortal creature; although it is unclear whether he was a beast that lived as a man or a man who lived as a beast. It is also suggested that he was cursed by the gods for daring to treat them like cattle, and thus banished to the Abyss. In any case, Baphomet reveled in his power, seeing the curse more as a blessing.

Almost a thousand years ago, Yeenoghu and Baphomet orchestrated an invasion of Western Oerik, opening vast portals in the forest of Ravilla. Armies of demons, gnolls, and minotaurs poured into the forests, burning them and slaughtering wood elves by the thousands. An army of elves, allied with Bahamut and his dragons, managed to defeat the demonic alliance after a long war. The portals were sealed shut and cities were built to guard them. Yeenoghu and Baphomet became enemies, each blaming the other for their defeat.

In the 4th edition setting, Baphomet was originally a primordial (an elemental god) who was corrupted by the Abyss eons ago.

Cult of BaphometEdit

According to Monster Mythology, Baphomet is increasingly attracting a following amongst minotaurs. He seeks to use them to further his schemes, notably to gain the upper hand in his battles against Yeenoghu.

Minions and related creaturesEdit

Baphomet has a multitude of minotaur, ogre and giant followers and minions. He is also served by ghour demons, a race of demons resembling burly, hairless minotaurs which command troops of these mortal minions.

Other publishersEdit

Baphomet appeared under the "demon" heading in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[13]

Baphomet appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 2: Lords of Chaos (2010), on page 12.[14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mentzer, Frank. "Ay pronunseeAY shun gyd" Dragon #93 (TSR, 1985)
  2. ^ Gygax, Gary. The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth (TSR, 1982)
  3. ^ Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual II (TSR, 1983)
  4. ^ Dobson, Michael, and Douglas Niles. The Throne of Bloodstone (TSR, 1988)
  5. ^ Sargent, Carl. Monster Mythology (TSR, 1992)
  6. ^ Winninger, Ray. Giantcraft (TSR, 1995)
  7. ^ McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  8. ^ Cook, Monte. Book of Vile Darkness (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  9. ^ Jacobs, James. "The Demonomicon of Iggwilv: Baphomet." Dragon #341 (Paizo Publishing, 2006)
  10. ^ Jacobs, James, Erik Mona, and Ed Stark. Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (Wizards of the Coast, 2006)
  11. ^ Mearls, Mike, Stephen Schubert, and James Wyatt. Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  12. ^ Schwalb, Robert J. "Demonomicon of Iggwilv: Baphomet, Prince of Beasts." Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2008. Available online: [1]
  13. ^ Green, Scott; Peterson, Clark (2002). Tome of Horrors. Necromancer Games. pp. 70–71. ISBN 1-58846-112-2.
  14. ^ Jacobs, James. Book of the Damned, Vol. 2: Lords of Chaos (Paizo, 2010)

Further readingEdit

  • Gygax, Gary. "Evening Odds". Pawn of Chaos. Clarkson, Ga: White Wolf Publishing, 1996.
  • Pramas, Chris. "The Empire of Ravilla". Dragon #285. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.
  • Pramas, Chris. "The Gnolls of Naresh". Dragon #289. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.