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Bāb aṣ-Ṣaghīr (Arabic: بَـاب الـصَّـغِـيْـر‎, "Small Gate"), also called Goristan-e-Ghariban,[4] may refer to one of the seven gates in the Old City of Damascus, and street in the modern city of Damascus, Syria. It has qubûr (Arabic: قُـبُـوْر‎, graves) on either side of the road,[1][2] and is located in the Dimashq Neighborhood, southwest of the Umayyad Mosque.

Bāb aṣ-Ṣaghīr (Arabic: بَـاب الـصَّـغِـيْـر‎)[1][2]
Baab-Sagheer.jpg
Coordinates33°30′22″N 36°18′23″E / 33.50611°N 36.30639°E / 33.50611; 36.30639[3]
LocationDamascus, Syria[4]
TypeGate

Contents

HistoryEdit

The bāb (Arabic: بَـاب‎, gate) was initially built by the Arameans, then it was dedicated to Zeus during the Seleucid era. During the Roman era, the gate was dedicated to Jupiter.[1][2] Stephanie Mulder in a book documenting and analyzing medieval Alid shrines in Syria points out that the "tomb [dedicated to Sukayna bint al-Husayn] in the Bab al-Saghir cemetery is consistently mentioned in medieval Arabic sources from the late twelfth century onwards, and the text-based findings relating to its location, original structure, phases of development and various patrons, afford well with the rich architectural evidence documented."[5]

CemeteryEdit

Maqbarah al-Bāb aṣ-Ṣaghīr (Arabic: مَـقْـبَـرَة الْـبَـاب الـصَّـغِـيْـر‎)[3]
 
From left to right, the graves of Maymunah (Umm Al-Hasan), Asma bint Umais, and Hamidah bint Muslim ibn Aqeel
Details
EstablishedUmayyad era[1]
Location
CountrySyria[4]
Coordinates33°30′22″N 36°18′23″E / 33.50611°N 36.30639°E / 33.50611; 36.30639[3]

Maqbarah al-Bāb aṣ-Ṣaghīr (Arabic: مَـقْـبَـرَة الْـبَـاب الـصَّـغِـيْـر‎)[3] is the ancient maqbarah (Arabic: مَـقْـبَـرَة‎, cemetery) which is adjacent to the gate.[6]

Notable interments:[4][7]

It is also said that the heads of 16 martyrs of the Battle of Karbala are buried in Bab Al-Saghir, such as:

  • Ali Abbas ibn Ali
  • Ali Akbar ibn Husain
  • Al-Qasim ibn Hasan
  • Hurr ibn Yazid ar-Riyahi
  • Habib ibn Muzahir

The following tombs are also found within this cemetery,[4] however these are empty graves created for the purpose of ziyārah (Arabic: زِيَـارَة‎), with the actual graves being at Jannaṫul-Baqī‘ (Classical Arabic: جَـنَّـةُ الْـبَـقِـيـع‎), in Medinah, Saudi Arabia:

In addition, the area has:

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Kramer, H. (2015-04-12). "Bab Al-Saghir Cemetery". The Complete Pilgrim. Retrieved 2018-03-12.
  2. ^ a b c Jowani, S. "Bab Al-Saghir". Love Damascus. Retrieved 31 October 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Demeter, D. (2014-09-24). "Damascus – Bab al-Saghir Cemetery (دمـشـق – مـقـبـرة الـبـاب الـصـغـيـر)". Syria Photo Guide. Retrieved 2018-03-12.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Places to Visit: Damascus". Ahlul Bayt Digital Islamic Library Project. 2014-09-24. Retrieved 2018-03-12.
  5. ^ The Shrines of the 'Alids in Medieval Syria: Sunnis, Shi`is and the Architecture of Coexistence. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2014. xiv+ 297 pages, bibliography, index. ISBN 978 7479 4 Chapter 3, page 129-41. https://www.academia.edu/33188700/Review_of_Stephennie_Mulder._The_Shrines_of_the_Alids_in_Medieval_Syria_Sunnis_Shiis_and_the_Architecture_of_Coexistence._Edinburgh_Edinburgh_University_Press_2014._xiv_297_pages_bibliography_index._ISBN_978_7479_4_hardback_
  6. ^ Barrani, S. "Bab Al-Saghir Cemetery". Retrieved 2018-03-12.
  7. ^ a b "Bab al-Saghir cemetery". IslamicLandmarks.com. Retrieved 2018-03-12.

External linksEdit