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Attractiveness or attraction is a quality that causes an interest, desire in, or gravitation to something or someone.[1]:59[2][Notes 1][Notes 2] Attraction may also refer to the object of the attraction itself, as in tourist attraction.

Contents

Visual attractivenessEdit

Visual attractiveness or visual appeal is attraction produced primarily by visual stimuli.

Physical attractivenessEdit

Physical attractiveness is the perception of the physical traits of an individual human person as pleasing or beautiful. It can include various implications, such as sexual attractiveness, cuteness, similarity and physique.[citation needed]

Judgment of attractiveness of physical traits is partly universal to all human cultures, partly dependent on culture or society or time period, partly biological, and partly subjective and individual.[3][1][2]

Eye candy (slang for visual appeal)Edit

Eye candy is a slang term for superficial attractiveness.[4] In a 2017 Boston Globe article about the potential for cheerleading at the Olympics, eye candy was used to describe cheerleaders as "entertainment popularized by professional sports in the United States."[5][6] The term has also been used in professional sports in the United States referring to female athletes.[7]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Their often-cited 1988 publication provided a "general theory of how psychological situations elicit emotions and make them intense. Its chief application is in computer science as the emotion engine of intelligent agents in computer games, and interactive training modules." Anthony Ortony, professor at Northwestern University with a focus on Psychology, Education, and Computer Science; Gerald L. Clore is a Psychology Professor at the University of Virginia with a focus on emotion and its cognitive consequences; and Allan Collins is professor of Learning Sciences specializing in Education, Psychology, and Artificial Intelligence at Northwestern University.
  2. ^ In The Cognitive Structure of Emotions Ortony, Clore and Collins describe the intensity of joy emotions; praiseworthiness affects the intensity of pride emotions, and appealingness affects the intensity of the object-based attraction emotions. The "perception of charm and physical beauty" through their influence on "appealingness" only have an indirect effect on the intensity of attraction emotions.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Ortony, Andrew; Gerald L. Clore; Allan Collins (1989). The Cognitive Structure of Emotions. Cambridge University Press. p. 59. doi:10.2307/2074241. ISBN 0-521-38664-0. 
  2. ^ a b Colby, B. N. (November 1989). "Review of 'The Cognitive Structure of Emotions' by Andrew Ortony, Gerald L. Clore and Allan Collins". Contemporary Sociology. American Sociological Association. 18 (6): 957–958. Retrieved September 28, 2017. 
  3. ^ Hönekopp, Johannes (2006). "Once more: Is beauty in the eye of the beholder? Relative contributions of private and shared taste to judgments of facial attractiveness" (PDF). APA. 
  4. ^ "The English We Speak". BBC. November 3, 2015. Retrieved September 27, 2017. 
  5. ^ Springer, Shira (February 18, 2017). "Is cheerleading coming to the Olympics?". Boston Globe. Retrieved September 27, 2017. 
  6. ^ Ryan, Shannon (January 7, 2016). "Time for NFL to end use of cheerleaders". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 27, 2017. 
  7. ^ "It's Time For Sports Broadcasting To Stop Relegating Women to Sideline Eye Candy". Forbes. January 21, 2017. Retrieved September 27, 2017.