Atlantic Coast Conference women's basketball Player of the Year

The Atlantic Coast Conference women's basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the women's basketball player in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) voted as the most outstanding player. It has been presented since the 1983–84, by the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association. The award was first given to Tresa Brown of North Carolina.

ACC women's basketball Player of the Year
Atlantic Coast Conference logo.svg
Awarded forthe most outstanding female basketball player in the Atlantic Coast Conference
CountryUnited States
Presented byAtlantic Coast Sports Media Association (1984–present)
History
First award1984
Most recentElizabeth Kitley, Virginia Tech

Two players have won the award three times: Alana Beard of Duke and Alyssa Thomas of Maryland.[1]

Duke has the most winners with 8 all-time.

KeyEdit

Co-Players of the Year
* Awarded a national Player of the Year award:
Associated Press Player of the Year (1994–95 to present)
Wade Trophy (1977–78 to present)
Naismith College Player of the Year (1982–83 to present)
John R. Wooden Award (2003–04 to present)
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player had been awarded the ACC Player of the Year award at that point

WinnersEdit

Season Player School Position Class[a] Reference
1983–84 Tresa Brown North Carolina C Senior [1]
1984–85 Pam Leake North Carolina PG Junior [1]
1985–86 Pam Leake (2) North Carolina PG Senior [1]
1986–87 Chris Moreland Duke PF Junior [1]
1987–88 Donna Holt Virginia PG Senior [1]
1988–89 Vicky Bullett Maryland F Senior [1]
1989–90 Andrea Stinson NC State SG Junior [1]
1990–91 Dawn Staley* Virginia PG Junior [1]
1991–92 Dawn Staley (2)* Virginia PG Senior [1]
1992–93 Heather Burge Virginia C Senior [1]
1993–94 Jessica Barr Clemson PF Senior [1]
1994–95 Wendy Palmer Virginia F Junior [1]
1995–96 Wendy Palmer (2) Virginia F Senior [1]
1996–97 Tracy Reid North Carolina PF Junior [1]
1997–98 Tracy Reid (2) North Carolina PF Senior [1]
1998–99 Summer Erb NC State C Senior [1]
1999–00 Georgia Schweitzer Duke PG Junior [1]
2000–01 Georgia Schweitzer (2) Duke PG Senior [1]
2001–02 Alana Beard Duke SG / SF Sophomore [1]
2002–03 Alana Beard (2) Duke SG / SF Junior [1]
2003–04 Alana Beard (3)* Duke SG / SF Senior [1]
2004–05 Monique Currie Duke SF Junior [1]
2005–06 Ivory Latta North Carolina PG Junior [1]
2006–07 Lindsey Harding* Duke PG Senior [1]
2007–08 Crystal Langhorne Maryland PF Senior [1]
2008–09 Kristi Toliver Maryland PG / SG Senior [1]
2009–10 Monica Wright Virginia PG Senior [1]
2010–11 Shenise Johnson Miami PG / SG Junior [1]
2011–12 Alyssa Thomas Maryland PF Sophomore [1]
2012–13 Alyssa Thomas (2) Maryland PF Junior [1]
2013–14 Alyssa Thomas (3) Maryland PF Senior [1]
2014–15 Jewell Loyd Notre Dame PG / SG Senior [1]
2015–16 Myisha Hines-Allen Louisville F Sophomore [1]
2016–17 Alexis Peterson Syracuse PG Senior [1]
2017–18 Asia Durr Louisville SG Junior [1]
2018–19 Asia Durr (2) Louisville SG Senior [1]
2019–20 Dana Evans Louisville SG Junior [2]
2020–21 Dana Evans (2) Louisville SG Senior [3]
2021–22 Elizabeth Kitley Virginia Tech C Junior [4]
2022–23 Elizabeth Kitley (2) Virginia Tech C Senior [5]

Winners by schoolEdit

School (year joined)[6] Winners Years
Duke (1953) 8 1987, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007
Virginia (1953) 7 1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 2010
Maryland (1953)[b] 6 1989, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014
North Carolina (1953) 6 1984, 1985, 1986, 1997, 1998, 2006
Louisville (2014) 5 2016, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021
NC State (1953) 2 1990, 1999
Virginia Tech (2004) 2 2022, 2023
Clemson (1953) 1 1994
Miami (FL) (2004) 1 2011
Notre Dame (2013) 1 2015
Syracuse (2013) 1 2017
Boston College (2005) 0
Florida State (1991) 0
Georgia Tech (1978) 0
Pittsburgh (2013) 0
Wake Forest (1953) 0

FootnotesEdit

  • a The "Class" column refers to United States terminology indicating that student's year of athletic eligibility, which usually (but not always) corresponds to the year of study. For example, a freshman is in his first year (of four) of eligibility, followed by sophomore, junior and senior.
  • b The University of Maryland left the ACC to join the Big Ten in 2014.[7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak "2019–20 ACC Women's Basketball Media Guide" (PDF). theACC.com. Fall 2019. Retrieved June 29, 2020.
  2. ^ "Louisville's Evans Named ACC Player of the Year, Boston College's Bernabei-McNamee Earns Coach of the Year". theacc.com. Atlantic Coast Conference. March 3, 2020. Retrieved June 29, 2020.
  3. ^ "ACC Women's Basketball Announces 2021 Award Winners". theacc.com. Atlantic Coast Conference. March 2, 2021. Retrieved March 2, 2021.
  4. ^ "ACC Women's Basketball Announces 2021-22 Award Winners". theacc.com. The Atlantic Coast Conference. March 1, 2022. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  5. ^ "Acc Women's Basketball Announces 2022-23 Award Winners". The Atlantic Coast Conference. February 28, 2023. Retrieved February 28, 2023.
  6. ^ "About the ACC". theACC.com. 2009. Archived from the original on 19 January 2012. Retrieved 3 September 2009.
  7. ^ "University Of Maryland To Join The Big Ten Conference" (Press release). Big Ten Conference. November 19, 2012. Archived from the original on 2013-05-18. Retrieved November 26, 2012.