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Anthony Browne (born 19 January 1967) is chairman of the UK Government's Regulatory Policy Committee,[1] and sits on the boards of a range of financial technology companies.[2][3] He was head of the British Bankers' Association from September 2012 to 2017 and sat on the Boards of the International Banking Federation, the European Banking Federation and TheCityUK.[4]

Contents

CareerEdit

JournalismEdit

Browne began his career as a journalist. He was business reporter and economics correspondent for the BBC (1993-1998); economics correspondent, health editor and environment correspondent for the Observer newspaper (1998-2002); and environment editor, Europe correspondent, and chief political correspondent for The Times (2002-2007). When Europe correspondent for The Times, he covered the enlargement of the EU to Eastern Europe, and the appointment of Peter Mandelson as European Commissioner. He also reported for The Times from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein, and has been a regular contributor to the Spectator magazine and the Daily Mail.

Browne was a columnist for City AM[5] and one of the founding columnists of the website ConservativeHome.[6]

Think tanksEdit

Browne was Director of Policy Exchange, the largest centre-right think tank in the UK, where he succeeded the founding director Nick Boles. He ran Policy Exchange for eighteen months, during which time it doubled in size, but attracted criticism that it came too close to Conservative leader David Cameron.[7]

Browne has written and contributed to various publications, including a book on whether Britain should join the European single currency, which entered the Sunday Times best-seller list; a pamphlet published by Civitas: The Institute for the Study of Civil Society discussing mass immigration which won Prospect magazine's think tank publication of the year award in 2003; and a Joseph Rowntree Foundation book on social evils; and a report for the think tank Open Europe supporting subsidiarity in the EU.

PoliticsEdit

Browne was Policy Director for Economic Development for Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London,[8] in charge of economic and business policy for London, sitting on the board of the London Development Agency,[9] and as an observer on the boards of the London Skills and Employment Board, and TheCityUK, which represents UK financial services. He was also chairman of the Mayor's Digital Advisory Board.

BankingEdit

After working for Boris Johnson, Browne became Morgan Stanley's head of regulatory affairs for Europe, the Middle East and Africa.[10]

Browne was appointed as CEO of the British Bankers' Association in June 2012, two weeks before the LIBOR scandal broke. Marcus Agius, the chairman of the BBA who appointed Browne, promptly resigned.[11] Shortly after Browne was appointed, the Daily Mail declared he was "the man who must clean up British banks".[12]

Browne was responsible for implementing reforms of LIBOR proposed by a review lead by Martin Wheatley, the then head of Financial Conduct Authority.[13][14] Browne then worked with a government-appointed tendering committee chaired by Baroness Hogg to transfer operation of LIBOR from the BBA.[15] Responsibility for the operation of LIBOR was transferred from the BBA to NYSE Euronext in January 2014.[16] As part of the ensuing Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards, chaired by Andrew Tyrie, Browne co-ordinated the industry to establish the Banking Standards Board.

Browne also set up the BBA’s first Consumer Panel.[17] In the wake of the 2016 referendum on Brexit, Browne famously warned in a controversial piece in The Observer newspaper that British based banks were about to relocate operations to the EU, with their hands “quivering over the relocate button”.[18]

In April 2017, he announced he was stepping down after five years as CEO, when the BBA merges with five other trade associations to form UK Finance.[19][20]

Major publicationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Anthony Browne appointed to the Regulatory Policy Committee". GOV.UK. Retrieved 2019-02-09.
  2. ^ "Anthony Browne joins Coconut board". specialistbanking.co.uk. Retrieved 2019-02-09.
  3. ^ "Revealed: Former British Bankers' Association chief executive Anthony Browne to join board of Unmortgage, a start-up aiming to overcome 'deposit barrier' to full home ownership; company will also announce £10m fundraising tomorrow". Twitter. Retrieved 2019-02-09.
  4. ^ "Board of Directors - TheCityUK". www.thecityuk.com.
  5. ^ "Anthony Browne". City A.M. Retrieved 2019-02-20.
  6. ^ "Anthony Browne". Conservative Home. Retrieved 2019-02-20.
  7. ^ Anthony Browne leaves Policy Exchange to become Boris Johnson's Policy Director ConservativeHome
  8. ^ Mayor of London website mayoral appointments Archived June 14, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ London Development Agency board members Archived July 28, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ "Appointment of Anthony Browne as Chief Executive of the British Bankers' Association". British Bankers' Association. 2012-06-12. Archived from the original on 2013-03-04. Retrieved 2012-07-04.
  11. ^ "Marcus Agius tenders resignation as BBA chairman". 2 July 2012 – via www.telegraph.co.uk.
  12. ^ Brummer, Alex (2013-02-06). "Anthony Browne, the man who must clean up British banks". This is Money. Retrieved 2019-02-20.
  13. ^ "Libor 'cannot continue unchanged'". 10 August 2012 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  14. ^ Browne, Anthony (11 July 2013). "Libor now has a new administrator – but our reforms have gone much further". www.cityam.com.
  15. ^ "Government announces LIBOR administrator tendering committee". GOV.UK. 2013-02-25. Retrieved 2019-02-20.
  16. ^ "NYSE Euronext to control Libor rate". 9 July 2013 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  17. ^ "Citizens Advice Chief To Head Banking Panel". Sky News.
  18. ^ editor, Daniel Boffey Observer policy (22 October 2016). "Brexit: leading banks set to pull out of UK early next year" – via www.theguardian.com.
  19. ^ "Browne to quit role as UK's top bank lobbyist". Sky News.
  20. ^ Earl, Nicholas (14 September 2018). "Russia may allow UK to interview Novichok suspects". www.cityam.com.
  21. ^ http://archive.openeurope.org.uk/Content/documents/Pdfs/EUlocalism.pdf