Ajanubahu (term)

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Ajanbahu is a Sanskrit word to describe a person whose length of arms is such that his fingers touch his knee.[1][2]

In Indian culture, persons with such physical characteristics are either gods, saints, kings or great warriors. The idols of Hindu gods like Rama, Lakshmana, Krishna when shown in standing position are depicted as ajanbahu feature. Even idols of Jain Tirthankars are shown as ajanbahu.[1] The great saints like, Sai Baba of Shirdi, Ramkrishna Paramhansa, Swami Samartha and Gajanan Maharaj were said to have ajanbahu characteristic.

In Buddhism, it is sometimes called paṭūrubāhatā[3] or sthitānavanatājānupralambabāhuḥ.[4] It is among the thirty-two marks of a great man and as such, is characteristic of all Buddhas.

Ajanbahu Jatbasha, was so called because of the length of his arms, his fingers reaching to his knees (ajanbahu)[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Arora, Udai Prakash (2007). Udayana: New Horizons in History, Classics and Inter-Cultural Studies By Abhay Kumar Singh, Udai Prakash Arora. p. 405. ISBN 9788179751688.
  2. ^ Ajanbahu Jatbasha, was eighth in descent from the founder of the dynasty, and was so called because of the length of his arms, his fingers reaching to his knees Chhindwara, Central Provinces (1907) pp 28
  3. ^ Padmakara Translation Group (2018). "The Transcendent Perfection of Wisdom in Ten Thousand Lines". 84000: Translating the Words of the Buddha. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  4. ^ Gelongma Karma Migme Chödrön; Migme, Ani (translator) (2001). "Chapter VIII - The Bodhisattvas". Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra. {{cite book}}: |first2= has generic name (help)
  5. ^ [1] Chhindwara, Central Provinces (1907) pp 28

See alsoEdit