2020 coronavirus pandemic in Vatican City

The 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was confirmed to have spread to Vatican City in March 2020.

2020 coronavirus pandemic in Vatican City
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationVatican City
Arrival date5 March 2020
(4 weeks)
Date28 March 2020
Confirmed cases6
Recovered0
Deaths
0

Due to Vatican City's small population of 618 people,[1] the country's six confirmed cases give it a case per capita ratio of 1%.

Pope Francis tested negative after having a cold.[2]

PrecautionsEdit

Pope Francis has cancelled his regular appearances in public to stop crowds gathering to see him and will stream them on the Internet because of the outbreak in Italy.[3]

TimelineEdit

COVID-19 cases in Vatican City  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-05
1(+100%)
1(=)
2020-03-24
4(+300%)
4(=)
2020-03-28
6(+50%)
Sources:

MarchEdit

The 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was confirmed to have spread to Vatican City on 5 March 2020, with one case.[4][5]

The 8 March Angelus was offered via livestreaming from the Pope's private library.[6] The Vatican Museums have been shut down from 8 March to 3 April.[7]

On 10 March, after the lockdown in Italy, Saint Peter's Square and St. Peter's Basilica were closed to tourists between 10 March and 3 April. Italy's lockdown measures are also applied to the Vatican City.[8]

On 11 March, the Pope offered a virtual general audience for the first time.[9]

On 16 March, Francis prayed at San Marcello al Corso in Rome before a crucifix which is regarded by Catholics as miraculous, and was carried in procession during the plague of 1522.[10]

On 24 March, three more cases were confirmed in Vatican City, with a total of 4 cases, one being a high ranking prelate.[11]

On 27 March Pope Francis delivered a special Urbi et Orbi blessing in an empty Saint Peter's Square praying for the end of coronavirus pandemic, before the San Marcello al Corso's miraculous crucifix that was moved from its original church in Rome two days ago.[12][13]

On 28 March, two more cases were confirmed in Vatican City, with a total of 6 cases.[14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Popolazione". www.vaticanstate.va. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  2. ^ Vagnoni, Giselda; Pullella, Philip (3 March 2020). "Pope tests negative for coronavirus, Italy report says". Reuters.
  3. ^ Pullella, Philip (7 March 2020). "Pope cancels main public appearances to stop crowds gathering amid coronavirus". Reuters.
  4. ^ Kelly-Linden, Jordan; Team, Global Health Security (6 March 2020). "Coronavirus latest news: Vatican City reports first case". The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 6 March 2020 – via www.telegraph.co.uk.
  5. ^ Reuters (6 March 2020). "Vatican Reports First Case of Coronavirus Inside Its Walls". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 6 March 2020 – via NYTimes.com.
  6. ^ Euronews (8 March 2020). "Pope Francis voices support for coronavirus victims in livestream message". Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  7. ^ Catholic News Agency (8 March 2020). "Vatican Museums closed until April 3". Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  8. ^ The Guardian (10 March 2020). "St Peter's Square before and after Italy's coronavirus lockdown – video". Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  9. ^ Reuters (11 March 2020). "Pope holds his first ever virtual general audience with Italy on lockdown". Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  10. ^ "Pope Francis Makes Walking Prayer Pilgrimage for Coronavirus Pandemic". National Catholic Register. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  11. ^ "Il Vaticano non chiude gli uffici "allo scopo di evitare il contagio": la gaffe nel comunicato, 4 i positivi". Il Messaggero. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  12. ^ "Pope's special Urbi et Orbi blessing: 'God turns everything to our good'". Vatican News. 27 March 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  13. ^ "Miraculous crucifix from 1522 plague moved to St. Peter's for pope's 'Urbi et Orbi' blessing". Aleteia. 26 March 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  14. ^ "Covid-19: 2 new cases in the Vatican, another 170 people tested - Vatican News". www.vaticannews.va. 28 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.

External linksEdit