Zhao Hong (Song dynasty)

Zhao Hong (c. 1207 – February 1225)[1] was a Crown Prince of the Song dynasty, the heir apparent of Emperor Ningzong.

Zhao Hong/Zhao Guihe
趙竑/趙貴和
Prince of Zhen 鎮王
Reignposthumously honored in 1275
Duke of Baling 巴陵郡公
Reignposthumously demoted in 1225
Prince of Jiyang 濟陽郡王
Prince of Ji 濟王
Reign1225
Crown Prince of Southern Song Dynasty
Reign1221-1224
PredecessorZhao Xun 趙詢
Successorvacant, Zhao Qi
Duke of Ji 濟國公
Reign1222
Duke of Qi 祁國公
Reign1221
Hereditary Prince of Yi 沂王後
Reign1206-1221
PredecessorZhao Bing
SuccessorZhao Guicheng
Bornc. 1207
Died1225 (aged 17–18)
SpouseLady Wu
IssueZhao Quan, Marquess of Yongling 永寧侯趙銓
Posthumous name
Zhao Su 昭肅
Prince Zhaosu of Zhen 鎮昭肅王
FatherZhao Xiqu 趙希瞿
Zhao Bing, Prince of Yi 沂王趙抦 (adopted)
Zhao Hong
Traditional Chinese趙竑
Simplified Chinese赵竑

BiographyEdit

Zhao Hong was the adopted son of Zhao Kai, who in turn was the biological son of Emperor Xiaozong. Zhao Hong was therefore, a adopted cousin of the reigning Emperor Ningzong.[2]

When the Crown Prince Zhao Xun died in 1220 from dysentery,[3] Emperor Ningzong asked for a boy at least 14 years old to adopt.[4] Zhao Hong was selected, adopted, and installed as Crown Prince in 1221.

DeposalEdit

The powerful chancellor Shi Miyuan did not want Hong to succeed Ningzong when he died because Shi Miyuan once found Zhao Hong sober and passed out on his quarters and in 1223, a lute-playing girl forced to act like a spy by Shi Miyuan spied on Zhao Hong and reported to Shi that once Zhao Hong would become Emperor, he would banish and exile Shi Miyuan and subordinates to the far south.[5][6][7] Shi Miyuan not wanting to lose his power decided to send his ally Yu Tianxi to locate a suitable heir. Yu found Zhao Yuju, a minor official in Shaoxing and sent him to Shi. Shi decided to groom him as the potential heir renaming him Zhao Guicheng and forced Empress Yang onto the plot.[6][7]

When Emperor Ningzong died, Shi Miyuan first brought Zhao Guicheng into the throne room and put him on the throne and then called Zhao Hong into the room without any bodyguards. Shi Miyuan then said that Zhao Guicheng was now the Emperor sparking protests from Zhao Hong until he was forced to bow in recognition of Zhao Guicheng.[6][8][9] Zhao Hong was moved to a nearby prefecture, Huzhou where he could live in luxury.[6][10]

DeathEdit

Zhao Hong was persuaded to join a rebellion after much resistance from him.[11] He was however defeated after two weeks.[11] He was executed by strangulation in February 1225.[3][6][10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zhao Hong must have been born at 1207 or lower since Emperor Ningzong asked for a boy at least 14. Subtract 14 from 1221 (year of Zhao Hong's adoption) and we get 1207.
  2. ^ Chaffee, John W. (1999). Branches of Heaven: A History of the Imperial Clan of Sung China. Harvard Univ Asia Center. p. 202. ISBN 9780674080492.
  3. ^ a b Davis, Richard L. "Troubles in Paradise: the Shrinking Royal Family in Southern Song" (PDF). National Palace Museum.
  4. ^ Olson, David R.; Cole, Michael (2013-06-17). Technology, Literacy, and the Evolution of Society: Implications of the Work of Jack Goody. Psychology Press. p. 63. ISBN 9781134812981.
  5. ^ W., Chaffee, John (1999). Branches of heaven : A history of the imperial clan of Sung China. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Asia Center. p. 203. ISBN 0674080491. OCLC 41338054.
  6. ^ a b c d e Olson, David R.; Cole, Michael (2013-06-17). Technology, Literacy, and the Evolution of Society: Implications of the Work of Jack Goody. Psychology Press. p. 64. ISBN 9781134812981.
  7. ^ a b Lily Xiao Hong Lee; Sue Wiles (28 January 2015). Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Women, Volume II: Tang Through Ming 618 - 1644. Taylor & Francis. pp. 789–790. ISBN 978-1-317-51561-6.
  8. ^ John, Chaffee (1999). Branches of Heaven: History of the Imperial Clan of Sung China. pp. 202–203.
  9. ^ McMahon, Keith (2016-04-21). Celestial Women: Imperial Wives and Concubines in China from Song to Qing. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 29. ISBN 9781442255029.
  10. ^ a b Hansen, Valerie (2014-07-14). Changing Gods in Medieval China, 1127-1276. Princeton University Press. p. 154. ISBN 9781400860432.
  11. ^ a b Chaffee, John W. (1999). Branches of Heaven: A History of the Imperial Clan of Sung China. Harvard Univ Asia Center. ISBN 9780674080492.
Zhao Hong (Song dynasty)
Born: c. 1207 Died: 1225
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Zhao Xun
Crown Prince of the Song dynasty
1221–1224
Vacant
Title next held by
Zhao Qi