Yolanda T. Marshall

Yolanda T. Marshall is a Canadian author of children's books.

Marshall in 2021

Early lifeEdit

Marshall, the oldest of three sisters, was born in Guyana and grew up in Scarborough, Toronto.[1][2] Her family moved to Canada when she was 14. Her father is a jazz musician.[3]

WritingEdit

Marshall's first children's book, Keman’s First Carnival, was published in 2016. Her children's books generally center around children partaking in elements of Caribbean culture, such as food and music.[3] Her books include:

She has also written two books of poetry, Obayifo (2008) and Messages on Dried Leaves (2017).[12]

Personal lifeEdit

Marshall lives in Scarborough, Toronto. She has a son,[4][6] who inspired several of her books.[13] As of 2020, she works in academic publishing.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Why Yolanda T. Marshall created a picture book about the tastes and sounds of Africa and the Caribbean". CBC Radio. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  2. ^ "Author Bio". ytmarshall.com. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  3. ^ a b c Dhanraj, Joanna (25 July 2020). "Canadian Guyanese writer set to release seventh book". Stabroek News. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  4. ^ a b Harris, Shakkira (10 December 2020). "'That's the magic of it': Author talks about the growing audience for diverse children's books". WRTV. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  5. ^ Bull, Megan (18 November 2021). "10 best diverse and inclusive Christmas books for children". Hello!. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  6. ^ a b Adler, Mike (24 September 2020). "Scarborough author's story brings Caribbean sounds and flavours to life". Toronto.com. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  7. ^ "The best Canadian picture books of 2020". CBC.ca. 18 December 2020. Retrieved 14 December 2021.
  8. ^ Adler, Mike (27 July 2021). "'Everybody wants to feel it': Scarborough author captures magic of Toronto's Caribbean carnival". Toronto.com. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  9. ^ Khokhar, Rabia (5 November 2021). "Rabia Khokhar recommends 8 new kids books to celebrate all our identities and experiences". Toronto Star. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  10. ^ "C is for Carnival". CBC.ca. 4 August 2021. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  11. ^ "33 Canadian picture books to watch for in spring 2022". CBC.ca. 10 March 2022. Retrieved 2 April 2022.
  12. ^ "Canada-based Guyanese children's book now available in Guyana". Stabroek News. 19 June 2021. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  13. ^ "This children's book highlights Caribbean holiday traditions – Breakfast Television". Breakfast Television. 22 December 2021. Retrieved 5 January 2022.

External linksEdit