Yarmouth–Dennis Red Sox

  (Redirected from Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox)

The Yarmouth–Dennis Red Sox, or Y-D Red Sox, are a collegiate summer baseball team based in South Yarmouth, Massachusetts. The team is a member of the Cape Cod Baseball League (CCBL) and plays in the league's East Division. The Red Sox play their home games at Red Wilson Field on the campus of Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School.

Yarmouth–Dennis Red Sox
Y-D Red Sox Logo, 2011.png
Information
LeagueCape Cod Baseball League (East Division)
LocationSouth Yarmouth, Massachusetts
BallparkMerrill "Red" WIlson Field
League championships1958, 1960, 1989, 1990, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2014, 2015, 2016
Former name(s)Yarmouth Indians (1946–67)
Yarmouth Red Sox (1968–76)
ManagerScott Pickler
General ManagerSteven Faucher
PresidentJim DeMaria
Websitewww.ydredsox.org

The Red Sox most recently won the CCBL championship in 2016 when they defeated the Falmouth Commodores two games to one to win the best of three championship series. The title was the team's third consecutive and sixth in a 13-year span. The Red Sox also won back-to-back league titles in 1989 and 1990. The team has been led since 1998 by Cypress College field manager Scott Pickler.

HistoryEdit

Pre-modern eraEdit

 
In 1883, Fred Tenney was principal of Yarmouth High School and pitched for the town team. He went on to play for the major league Boston Reds the following season.

Early yearsEdit

Baseball in the town of Yarmouth dates back to the early days of the sport on Cape Cod. The Yarmouth Mattakeesetts were organized in 1867 and battled the "Barnstable Cummaquids" on at least three occasions that year. After splitting their first two recorded contests, the seemingly evenly-matched teams met for a highly-anticipated third game, this time as an attraction at the Barnstable County Fair. The Cummaquids took the lopsided match, 30–13, and with their victory secured the prize of a "beautiful silver mounted carved black walnut bat costing $15."[1][2]

In 1877, Yarmouth split a pair of games against the "Sandwich Resolutes".[3][4] In a July 4 contest the following year, the Resolutes defeated Yarmouth, 14–2,[5] but the teams played a much more closely contested game when they met once more in 1879.[6] The Yarmouth team met up with a team from Barnstable again in 1883 for a July 4 contest that had become an annual event.[7] The 1883 Yarmouth team featured pitcher Fred Tenney,[8][9] principal of Yarmouth High School, who went on to play in the major leagues with the Washington Nationals and the Boston Reds of the Union Association.[10][11][12]

In 1886, the Yarmouth Grays dropped a July 3 contest to the Brewster town club, 11–9, in a game that saw Brewster turn a rare triple play.[13] The Grays fared better that season against teams from Barnstable and Harwich, defeating those clubs by decisive margins of 31–3 and 19–7.[14][15]

In 1891 and 1892, Harvard University's Frank Hallowell was player/manager for the South Yarmouth team. Hallowell was a two-time gridiron All-American for Harvard, and also played center field for the Crimson nine. While at South Yarmouth, he was praised for his "fine work, and especially his system of coaching."[16][17]

The early Cape League era (1923–1939)Edit

In 1923, the Cape Cod Baseball League was formed and initially included four teams: Falmouth, Chatham, Osterville, and Hyannis.[18] This early Cape League operated through the 1939 season and disbanded in 1940, due in large part to the difficulty of securing ongoing funding during the Great Depression.[19][20] During this period, teams from various towns moved in and out of the league each season. The Yarmouth Athletic Association did not enter a team in the Cape League during this era, but played instead in the Cape Cod Twilight League.[21][22][23]

The Upper and Lower Cape League era (1946–1962)Edit

The Cape League reorganized in 1946 after a hiatus during World War II. The Yarmouth Indians and Dennis Clippers played in the Lower Cape Division. The Indians played at the John Simpkins school in South Yarmouth, while the Clippers' played home games at the Ezra Baker school in South Dennis. The neighboring towns developed a heated rivalry throughout the 1940s and 1950s.

The Clippers were the first in the Lower Cape league to play home games at night, as lights were installed at Baker Field in 1949, and the field also boasted an electronic scoreboard.[24][25] The Lower Cape teams held their annual All-Star Game under the Baker lights in 1949, the Dennis diamond being considered one of the finest in the Cape League at the time.[26][27][28] Skipper Bren Taylor's Clippers reached the CCBL title series in 1956, defeating Orleans in the semi-final playoffs,[29][30] but losing out to Sagamore in the finals.[31] The Clippers teams of the late 1950s and early 1960s featured hard-hitting infielder Jim Cross, an ice hockey star from Boston University,[32][33][34] and CCBL Hall of Famer Bill Livesey of the University of Maine.[35][36] The Clippers withdrew from the league and disbanded after the 1961 season.[37]

 
A game at Merrill "Red" WIlson Field, home of the Y-D Red Sox

CCBL Hall of Famer Cal Burlingame pitched for the Indians in the early 1950s, tossing no-hitters for Yarmouth in 1953 and 1954.[38][36] The Indians of the late 1950s and early 1960s were skippered by John Halunen, and starred CCBL Hall of Famer Merrill "Red" Wilson, who joined the club in 1956. He became a seven-time all-star catcher for Yarmouth, and led the Indians to CCBL championships in 1958 and 1960, defeating the powerful Sagamore Clouters for both titles.[39]

The 1958 Indians featured star hurlers Bob Sherman and Jack Silver, as well as CCBL Hall of Famer Jim Hubbard, an outfielder who went on to manage Cotuit to four consecutive Cape League titles in the 1960s.[40] Yarmouth met perennial league powerhouse Orleans in the best-of-three Lower Cape title series. The teams split the first two games, with the Indians taking Game 1, 3–0, but dropping Game 2, 5–1. In Game 3, Yarmouth broke out the big bats against Orleans hurler and future major leaguer Art Quirk, the Lower Cape's Outstanding Pitcher of the season. The Indians piled up seven runs on Quirk, and Sherman made it stand up for a 7–5 series-clinching victory.[41][42] The Indians moved on to face a powerful Sagamore team in the Cape League finals. In Game 1, the Indians shut down the Clouters' attack with a three-hit gem by Silver for a 2–1 victory. Sherman took the mound in Game 2, and the Indians came away with the 4–3 win to sweep the series and claim the team's first Cape League crown.[43]

In 1960, Halunen's boys were at it again.[44] After dispatching the Dennis Clippers in the first round of the playoffs, the Indians faced Harwich for the Lower Cape title. The Indians got a three-hit shutout performance by Ron Normand in Game 1 to win, 6–0. Game 2 was a pitcher's duel between Harwich's Dick Mayo and the Indians' Ned LeRoy. LeRoy no-hit Harwich through 6 2/3 innings, and finished strong in the 1–0 series-clinching win for Yarmouth.[45] In the Cape League finals, Yarmouth would again meet up with Upper Cape champ Sagamore. Yarmouth took a rainy Game 1 by a score of 7–6. Games 2 and 3 were played as a doubleheader. The Indians dropped Game 2 at Sagamore, but came back to win the crown before a home crowd in Yarmouth.[46]

In 1961, Red Wilson was named Lower Cape league MVP, and teammate Dick Cassani was the league's Outstanding Pitcher.[47] The Indians were dominant in the regular season,[48] and met up with Orleans for the Lower Cape finals. Cassani no-hit Orleans to win Game 1, 3–0, but Orleans answered by taking Game 2. Orleans looked to have the decisive Game 3 in hand, up 6–1 in the ninth, but the Indians staged a dramatic rally to take the game and the series. Yarmouth went on to face Cotuit in the Cape League championship series, but was downed two games to one.[49][50]

 
17-year-old high schooler Bobby Valentine batted .294 and led the CCBL in runs scored for Yarmouth in 1967.

Modern era (1963–present)Edit

In 1963, the CCBL was reorganized and became officially sanctioned by the NCAA. The league would no longer be characterized by "town teams" who fielded mainly Cape Cod residents, but would now be a formal collegiate league. Teams began to recruit college players and coaches from an increasingly wide geographic radius.

The league was originally composed of ten teams, which were divided into Upper Cape and Lower Cape divisions. Yarmouth joined Harwich, Chatham, Orleans and a team from Otis Air Force Base in the Lower Cape Division.

The 1960s and 1970sEdit

Yarmouth's 1965 team featured Colby College hurler Joe Jabar, who went 7–4 for the Indians on the season. He pitched nine complete games and fanned 74 batters in 14 starts, and was named the Lower Cape Division's starting pitcher at the 1965 CCBL All-Star Game. Jabar went on to pitch two more stellar seasons in the CCBL with Chatham, and was inducted into the CCBL Hall of Fame in 2003.[51] His playing days with the Indians now behind him, Merrill "Red" Wilson became the club's skipper in 1966, and would serve in that role for 16 of the next 21 years.

In 1967, Yarmouth was managed by CCBL Hall of Famer Lou Lamoriello.[52] A former all-star player in the league, Lamoriello had managed Sagamore to the league title in 1965. He recruited a rising high school senior from Connecticut to play for his 1967 Yarmouth team, and the 17-year-old Bobby Valentine proceeded to bat .294 against the Cape League's elite collegiate pitching that summer, while leading the league in runs scored. Valentine's performance impressed the Los Angeles Dodgers, who made him the 5th overall pick in the following year's MLB draft.[53][54] Valentine's roommate at Yarmouth was CCBL Hall of Famer Dan DeMichele, himself a three-time CCBL all-star who had played on Lamoriello's championship 1965 Sagamore squad.[55]

Boston Red Sox stars George "Boomer" Scott and Rico Petrocelli were in town for the 8th annual "Yarmouth Red Sox Day" in 1970.

In 1968, manager Red Wilson returned to his position after a one-year hiatus, and the team became known as the Yarmouth Red Sox. Beginning in the early 1960s, the Yarmouth Chamber of Commerce had annually invited Boston Red Sox players, officials, and their families to take an all-expenses-paid getaway to Yarmouth during the MLB All-Star break, an event that had been billed as "Yarmouth Red Sox Day".[56] The 1968 decision to change the team name "[recognized] the remarkable success of the annual visit to Yarmouth of the Boston team...which has established a special relationship between Yarmouth and the Red Sox,"[57] and capitalized on local excitement surrounding the Boston team's 1967 "Impossible Dream" season.

In 1973, the team's home games were moved from Simpkins Field to the Dennis-Yarmouth High School baseball diamond, and Yarmouth proceeded to make its first appearance in the league championship series in the modern era.[58] The team featured future major leaguer Dave Schuler, who was the winning pitcher in the league All-Star Game that year. Despite posting a losing record in the regular season, skipper Red Wilson's Red Sox upset regular-season champion Chatham in the semi-final playoff series. Yarmouth went on to drop the championship series in five games to a Cotuit team that was in the midst of a string of four consecutive league titles.[59][60]

In 1977, the team name was expanded to take in the town of Dennis. With the name change, the Red Sox continued to call D-Y High School home, although plans originally called for the team to play a limited number of home dates in Dennis at Ezra Baker School field.[61][62] In a repeat of 1973, the now Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox defeated Chatham in the playoff semi-finals but fell to Cotuit in the championship series.[63][64] Y-D was led by future New York Yankees slugger Steve Balboni. Balboni hit 13 home runs for Y-D in 1977, and clobbered another two over Fenway Park's Green Monster in the annual CCBL All-Star Game.[65] He was named league MVP and Outstanding Pro Prospect, and was inducted into the CCBL Hall of Fame in 2006.[40]

 
Y-D's Craig Biggio (1986) made it to Cooperstown in 2015.

The 1980s and 1990s bring back-to-back championshipsEdit

Red Wilson continued to manage the Red Sox into the early 1980s. A beloved teacher, administrator, coach and athletic director at Dennis-Yarmouth High School, the baseball diamond shared by the school with the Y-D Red Sox was renamed in Wilson's honor in 1981.[66][67][68] The 1981 Red Sox featured CCBL Hall of Famer Mark Angelo, who hit .335 and led the league with 14 home runs and 47 RBIs.[52] The Red Sox' 1982 season was highlighted by an 18–3 July 4 win at Falmouth in which Y-D's Joe Olker went 6-for-6 and tied a league record with three home runs in the game.[69] Craig Biggio of the 1986 Y-D Red Sox went on to amass over 3,000 major league hits, and was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York in 2015.[70]

Y-D returned to the league championship series in 1987, fueled by league MVP and CCBL Hall of Famer Mickey Morandini, who led the league in batting (.376) and established a new CCBL single-season record with 43 stolen bases.[71] Despite losing the title series to Harwich,[72] the 1987 season marked the beginning of a four-year stretch under CCBL Hall of Fame skipper Don Reed[73] in which the Red Sox would make the playoffs each season, including three consecutive East Division regular season titles, and back-to-back league championships. The 1988 team featured future major leaguers Mike Mordecai, Denny Neagle, and CCBL Hall of Famer Eric Wedge,[74] but was bounced from the playoffs in the semi-finals by Orleans.

 
CCBL Hall of Famer Mark Sweeney starred for Y-D's back-to-back champs of 1989 and 1990.

In 1989, the Red Sox broke through with their first league title of the modern era. The team finished the regular season in first place atop the East Division, then faced Brewster in the playoff semi-finals. Y-D took Game 1 from the Whitecaps, 2–1, in 15 innings, and finished the series sweep with a 4–3 victory. In the league championship series, the Red Sox faced the Hyannis Mets. In Game 1 at Red Wilson Field, Red Sox hurler Jim Dougherty tossed a three-hit shutout and the Sox got homers from league MVP Kurt Olson Y-D and Holliston, Massachusetts native Mark Sweeney[75] to stomp the Mets, 9–0. Game 2 was played in a steady rain at McKeon Field. Y-D got two triples from Sweeney and came away with a 6–1 triumph to sweep the series and claim the league crown. Sweeney, who hit .500 in 20 postseason at-bats, was named playoff MVP.[76][77]

Sweeney, the star of the 1989 title club, returned to the Sox for the 1990 campaign. Y-D again finished the regular season atop the East Division, and swept Orleans in the semi-final playoff series. The Sox would face a talented Wareham team in the title series. Y-D got 19 hits in Game 1 at home to outslug the Gatemen, 14–7. Sox catcher Kirk Piskor blasted three long balls in the game, including two in the eight-run third inning. Wareham held serve in Game 2, holding Y-D to just six hits en route to a 6–0 shutout at Clem Spillane Field. Game 3 went down to the wire, with Sweeney knocking a game-winning walk-off RBI in the ninth to give the Sox an 8–7 win and their second consecutive CCBL championship. Playoff MVP honors went to Piskor, and two-time title series hero Sweeney would later be inducted into the CCBL Hall of Fame.[78][79][80] After the series, it was announced that winning Red Sox skipper Don Reed would not be asked to return the following season due to "philosophical differences."[81] Reed went on to manage Wareham throughout the 1990s, where he won another pair of CCBL titles.

After its 1990 title, Y-D suffered a 10-season playoff drought, but the team nevertheless featured several notable players. The 1991 team was led by league MVP Brent Killen,[82] and the 1993 team featured two top pitchers in the league's Outstanding Pro Prospect Chris Clemons and the league's Outstanding Pitcher Andy Taulbee. Jon Petke led the CCBL in batting in 1994 with a .379 mark, and sluggers Todd Greene and Eddy Furniss claimed the All-Star Game Home Run Hitting titles in 1992 and 1996 respectively. Y-D's 1997 team featured league batting champ Jason McConnell (.345), and home run champ Edmund Muth (7), the East Division MVP of the All-Star Game.[83]

 
Buster Posey, shortstop/catcher for the 2006 & 2007 back-to-back CCBL champion Red Sox

Three titles in four years mark the 2000sEdit

Led by manager Scott Pickler, longtime Cypress College coach who had joined the Red Sox in 1998,[84] Y-D finished in first place atop the East Division five times and took three CCBL championship crowns in a span of four years in the 2000s. Red Sox Slugger Jason Cooper was the league's home run derby champ in consecutive seasons in 2000 and 2001.[85][86] University of Michigan righty Jim Brauer was an all-star for Y-D in 2001 with a 1.84 ERA, then returned in 2002 and tossed a nine-inning complete game no-hitter against Chatham.[87] The Red Sox boasted the league's Outstanding Pro Prospect in 2002, as Wes Whisler, who set a league record with base hits in nine consecutive at bats, took the honors.[88]

Pickler's first title came in 2004, when the team rolled through the playoffs, sweeping Brewster in the semi-finals,[89][90] and sweeping Falmouth in the finals. The Red Sox took Game 1 of the title series at home, 4–3, on shortstop Ryan Rohlinger's game-winning 8th inning homer.[91][92] Game 2 of the finals was an all-time classic, with the Sox coming back to tie the game at Guv Fuller Field in the ninth inning on an RBI by CCBL Outstanding New England Player Award winner Frank Curreri.[93] With two outs and the bases loaded in the bottom of the tenth, Y-D outfielder Jim Rapaport made a game-saving diving catch on a sinking liner to right. In the top of the 11th, Y-D opened it up with four runs, including a two-run bomb by Nick Moresi, to secure the 8–4 victory and claim the league crown.[94][95] Y-D was led by playoff co-MVPs Rohlinger and pitcher Joshua Faiola. Rohlinger hit .429 in the postseason, including a key squeeze bunt in the 11th inning of the Game 2 finale. Faiola earned the save in Game 1 of the finals, then got the win in Game 2, pitching two innings of scoreless relief.[96]

Pickler's 2006 team featured future San Francisco Giants all-star catcher Buster Posey, who was a CCBL all-star at shortstop. The team was particularly strong on the mound, boasting the league's Outstanding Pitcher Terry Doyle and the Outstanding Relief Pitcher Josh Fields.[97] Doyle, a Warwick, Rhode Island native and Boston College product, struck out 52 on the season, including 12 in his July 16 no-hit performance against Chatham.[98] Y-D lost Game 1 of its semi-final playoff series at home against Brewster, but went on the road to claim Game 2 and won the series at home in Game 3.[99][100][101] The same sequence repeated in the finals, as Y-D dropped Game 1 at home to Wareham, only to tie the series with a road victory in Game 2,[102] and claim the championship at home in front of a crowd of over 8,000 at Red Wilson Field. In the decisive game, Y-D starter Doyle was perfect through four, going six innings with nine strikeouts and one walk and allowing only one run in the Red Sox' 5–1 victory.[103][104][105] Playoff MVP honors went to Red Sox reliever David Robertson, who pitched a perfect three innings with seven strikeouts to close out the Gatemen in the finale.[106]

 
Y-D's Chris Sale won the 2009 CCBL Outstanding Pitcher Award.

Posey returned for the 2007 campaign, and was surrounded by perhaps an even more talented squad. He shared time at shortstop with future major leaguer Gordon Beckham, and at catcher with future major leaguer Jason Castro, both of whom were named All-Star Game starters for the East Division in 2007, with Posey making the all-star team as a reserve. Beckham would lead the league in dingers with nine, and was tied for tops in RBI with 35. The team also featured the league's Outstanding Relief Pitcher, Nick Cassavechia, who led the league with 11 saves while recording a 1.07 ERA with 24 strikeouts and only three walks in 25.1 innings of work.[107] The team cruised to the playoffs with a dominating 31–12–1 regular season record. As in 2004, the Red Sox swept the final series against Falmouth, again winning the final game in Falmouth in dramatic fashion by scoring the go-ahead run on a Nick Romero suicide squeeze in the eighth inning scoring Posey. Castro scored another on a passed ball and Y-D's 2–0 lead held up as Y-D took the crown.[108][109][110] Playoff MVP honors went to Game 2 starter Trevor Holder who held the Commodores to one hit in eight innings while striking out ten. Holder gave way to Cassavechia who struck out the side in the ninth to claim the title for Y-D.[111] The Red Sox had won their third title in four years, and the 2007 trio of Posey, Beckham and Castro would go on to be selected as three of the top ten picks in the 2008 MLB draft.

Pickler's 2009 team again featured the league's top pitchers. The tall southpaw and future Boston Red Sox ace Chris Sale won the CCBL Outstanding Pitcher Award, fanning a league-high 57 batters while walking only nine in 55 innings of work with a 1.47 ERA.[112] CCBL Outstanding Relief Pitcher Tyler Burgoon led the league with 12 saves, striking out 34 in 21.1 innings with a 1.69 ERA.[113]

The 2010s and a Y-D "three-peat"Edit

After winning three titles in four years with the Red Sox in the 2000s, manager Scott Pickler bested that feat in the 2010s, skippering Y-D to three consecutive league championships from 2014 to 2016, qualifying for postseason play in every year of the decade, and reaching the finals series five times.

Stanford University hurler Jordan Pries provided one of the highlights of the 2010 season when he tossed a no-hitter against Orleans.[114] Y-D boasted the East Division All-Star Game MVP in three consecutive seasons with Caleb Ramsey in 2010,[115] James Ramsey (no relation) in 2011,[116] and Alex Blandino in 2012. The Red Sox also owned consecutive league batting crowns with Stephen Piscotty's .349 mark in 2011,[117] and Patrick Biondi's .388 in 2012.[118] The team reached the league championship series in 2010 and again in 2012, but were shut down by Cotuit and Wareham respectively.[119][120]

 
Andrew Stevenson won a CCBL championship with Y-D in 2014.

The 2014 Red Sox featured future major leaguers Andrew Stevenson and Walker Buehler, and the league's Outstanding Pro Prospect and Outstanding Relief Pitcher, Phil Bickford.[121] The team began the season winning only five of its first 16 games, but came on strong in the second half. In the opening round of the playoffs, Y-D dropped Game 1 to Orleans, but with Buehler on the mound in Game 2, the Red Sox answered back with a 9–0 pasting of the Firebirds to even the series.[122][123] Y-D pushed across a run on a second inning sacrifice bunt in Game 3, and Kevin Duchene twirled a masterful one-hit gem, allowing only one hit in 7 1/3 innings. The single run stood up as Bickford came in to slam the door and give the Sox a 1–0 victory to claim the series.[124] In the East Division finals against Harwich, center fielder Stevenson provided the power in Game 1, clouting a homer and four RBIs in the Sox' 7–2 road win.[125] The Mariners took Game 2, but Y-D prevailed in the Game 3 pitchers' duel, 2–0, on a combined shutout by Justin Jacome and Bickford, who struck out six in 2 2/3 innings for the save.[126][127][128] In the championship series, Y-D faced Falmouth, and sent Buehler to the mound in Game 1. Buehler tossed eight shutout innings, and late-season call-up catcher Marcus Mastrobuoni went 3-for-4 with a homer, three RBIs, and two runs scored as the Sox took the opener, 5–0.[129] Game 2 at Red Wilson Field was back-and-forth early, but the Sox took the lead with a six-run sixth, and handed the game over to Bickford, who tossed the final three innings of shutout ball for the save to close out the title sweep with a 10–4 win. Playoff MVP honors were shared by ace Buehler and the hot-hitting Mastrobuoni, who batted .444 in the playoffs and went 5-for-6 while driving in five of the team's 15 runs in the championship series.[130][131][132]

Y-D narrowly squeaked into the playoffs in 2015, not clinching a spot until the final day of the regular season. The club was led by all-stars up the middle with double-play tandem Tommy Edman and Donnie Walton and center fielder Cole Billingsley, and also featured switch-hitting slugger Gio Brusa, and mound ace Ricky Thomas. The Sox swept Brewster in the opening round of playoffs, with Thomas twirling six scoreless innings in the Game 2 clincher.[133][134][135] In the East Division finals against Orleans, Y-D dropped Game 1 on the road,[136] but came back to win a dramatic Game 2 at Red Wilson Field. Tied at 1–1 after seven, the Red Sox brought in Ben Bowden for five innings of scoreless relief. With the bases loaded in the bottom of the 13th, Brusa stole home on a wild pitch to give the Sox the 2–1 victory to even the series.[137] Brusa led off the scoring early in Game 3, launching a bomb over the Eldredge Park center field fence, and starter Dustin Hunt struck out 10 and allowed only two Firebird hits in 7 2/3 shutout innings. Walton drove in Brusa for another run in the eighth, and the Red Sox held on for a 2–1 win that propelled them to the title series for the second consecutive season.[138][139] In the championship round, Y-D faced Hyannis, who crushed the Sox, 8–1, in Game 1 at McKeon Park.[140] Y-D bounced back with a 9–3 victory at home in Game 2 behind the stellar mound work of Thomas, a three-run bomb by Walton, and a two-run shot by Edman.[141] In Game 3, the Sox returned to Hyannis and avenged their 8–1 Game 1 defeat, this time coming out on top of an 8–1 tally. Billingsley's three-run eighth-inning homer sealed the deal, Bowden tossed the final two innings of relief, and Y-D took home its second consecutive league title.[142][143][144] Playoff MVP honors for Y-D were shared by Walton and Bowden.[145]

The Red Sox completed the "three-peat" in 2016,[146] led by a sterling playoff performance by University of Maryland infielder Kevin Smith. The club met Orleans in the opening round of the playoffs, and took Game 1 with a 4–2 win marked by a mammoth blast by Smith.[147] The Sox completed the sweep in Game 2 at Eldredge Park, taking a tight 2–1 ballgame on the strength of a second-inning dinger by Cape Cod native Will Toffey,[148][149] and an eighth-inning RBI by Joey Thomas.[150] The win set up an East Division finals match with Chatham. Smith homered again in Game 1 at Red Wilson Field, and Y-D took the slugfest, 9–8.[151] The Sox completed their second series sweep in Game 2 on the road, getting six effective innings by starter William Montgomery, and prevailing by a 4–1 tally, sending the Sox to a title series match against Falmouth.[152][153] The Sox fell to Falmouth, 5–4, in the Game 1 opener at Guv Fuller Field.[154] In Game 2 at home, Y-D jumped out to a 3–0 lead in the first on back-to-back homers by Toffey and Deon Stafford, Jr., and got a two-run clout in the fourth by Smith, knotting the series with a 9–4 win.[155] The Sox went up on the Commodores early in Game 3, scoring three runs in the first two innings to take a 3–0 lead. Starter Bryan Sammons tossed six-plus shutout innings of two-hit baseball to make the score hold up as the final tally, the win earning the Red Sox their third consecutive league title.[156][157][158] Smith was awarded playoff MVP honors, having batted .370 with three homers in the playoffs.[159] His sixth league championship, the 2016 title tied Scott Pickler with Falmouth's Bill Livesey for CCBL career championships by a manager. Pickler was inducted into the CCBL Hall of Fame in 2019.[160][161]

Y-D again boasted the league's top pitchers in 2017 with CCBL Outstanding Pitcher Kris Bubic[162] and Outstanding Relief Pitcher Riley McCauley.[163] Former team president, general manager, and longtime volunteer Barbara Ellsworth was inducted into the CCBL Hall of Fame in 2018.[75][164][165] The 2019 Red Sox were led by the league's Outstanding Pro Prospect Austin Wells, who batted .308 with seven homers.[166]

The 2020sEdit

The 2020 CCBL season was cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.[167]

CCBL Hall of Fame inducteesEdit

 
CCBL Hall of Famer Eric Wedge
 
CCBL Hall of Famer and 1987 league MVP Mickey Morandini

The CCBL Hall of Fame and Museum is a history museum and hall of fame honoring past players, coaches, and others who have made outstanding contributions to the CCBL.[168] Below are the inductees who spent all or part of their time in the Cape League with Yarmouth-Dennis.

Year Inducted Ref. Name Position
2000 [39] Merrill "Red" Wilson Player/Manager
2002 [36] Bill Livesey Player
Cal Burlingame Player
2003 [51] Joe Jabar Player
2004 [73] Don Reed Manager
2005 [71] Mickey Morandini Player
2006 [40] Jim Hubbard Player
Steve Balboni Player
2009 [52] Mark Angelo Player
Lou Lamoriello Manager
2011 [74] Eric Wedge Player
2012 [55] Dan DeMichele Player
2018 [75] Barbara Ellsworth Executive
Mark Sweeney Player
2019 [160] Scott Pickler Manager

Famous alumniEdit

Yearly resultsEdit

 
Kirk McCaskill pitched for Yarmouth-Dennis in 1980.
 
Mike Bordick played for Y-D in 1986
 
Michael Bourn, 2002 Y-D Red Sox
 
Justin Turner, Y-D 2005
 
Gordon Beckham played on Y-D's 2007 CCBL championship team
 
Jason Castro was a CCBL all-star catcher for Y-D in 2007
 
2008 Y-D hurler Joe Kelly
 
Jake Lamb, 2011 Y-D Red Sox
 
2015 Y-D hurler Shane Bieber

Results by season, 1946–1962Edit

Yarmouth Indians
Year Postseason Manager Ref
1946 Oliver Hallett [169]
1947 Percy Brown [170]
1948 Percy Brown [170]
1949 Ned Harrison [171]
1950 Ned Harrison [172]
1951 Ken Chase [173]
1952 Al Marchant
Ted Reynolds
[174]
1953 Lost semi-finals (Orleans) Ted Reynolds [175]
1954
1955
1956 Lost round 1 (Orleans) Ted Reynolds [176]
1957
1958 Won semi-finals (Orleans)
Won championship (Sagamore)
John Halunen [41][43]
1959 John Halunen [49]
1960 Won round 1 (Dennis)
Won semi-finals (Harwich)
Won championship (Sagamore)
John Halunen [44][45]
[46][177]
1961 Won semi-finals (Orleans)
Lost championship (Cotuit)
John Halunen [48][49]
[50]
1962 Lost round 1 (Chatham) John Halunen [37][177]
Dennis Clippers (1946–1961)
Year Postseason Manager Ref
1946 Ralph Richardson [178]
1947 Ralph Richardson [179]
1948 Thacher Chase [180]
1949 Joe Walker [181]
1950 Russ Chase [182]
1951 Lost semi-finals (Orleans) [183]
1952 Bren Taylor
Bill Chapman
[184]
1953
1954 Bill Chapman [185]
1955
1956 Won round 1 (Brewster)
Won semi-finals (Orleans)
Lost championship (Sagamore)
Bren Taylor [29][30]
[31]
1957
1958
1959 Bill "Lefty" Lefebvre [186]
1960 Lost round 1 (Yarmouth) Bill "Lefty" Lefebvre [186][177]
1961

Results by season, 1963–presentEdit

Year Won Lost Tied Regular Season Finish Postseason Manager
1963 7 24 0 5th Lower Cape Division John Halunen
1964 Charlie Duchesney
1965 16 18 0 3rd Lower Cape Division Charlie Duchesney
1966 12 22 0 4th Lower Cape Division Merrill "Red" Wilson
1967 20 20 0 2nd Lower Cape Division (T) Lou Lamoriello
1968 16 24 0 4th Lower Cape Division Merrill "Red" Wilson
1969 21 22 0 3rd Lower Cape Division Merrill "Red" Wilson
1970 13 26 0 6th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1971 15 23 3 6th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1972 15 24 3 6th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1973 19 20 3 4th League Won semi-finals (Chatham)
Lost championship (Cotuit)
Merrill "Red" Wilson
1974 16 23 3 7th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1975 20 20 2 4th League Lost semi-finals (Falmouth) Bob Stead
1976 10 27 4 8th League Bob Stead
1977 21 17 3 3rd League Won semi-finals (Chatham)
Lost championship (Cotuit)
Bob Stead
1978 13 29 0 8th League Bob Stead
Brian Sabean
1979 14 25 2 8th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1980 19 21 1 5th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1981 19 22 1 6th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1982 18 23 1 5th League (T) Merrill "Red" Wilson
1983 18 18 5 5th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1984 13 28 1 8th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1985 14 27 1 7th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1986 15 23 3 8th League Merrill "Red" Wilson
1987 24 15 0 2nd League Won semi-finals (Hyannis)
Lost championship (Harwich)
Don Reed
1988 22 18 0 1st East Division Lost semi-finals (Orleans) Don Reed
1989 28 15 1 1st East Division Won semi-finals (Brewster)
Won championship (Hyannis)
Don Reed
1990 24 16 3 1st East Division Won semi-finals (Orleans)
Won championship (Wareham)
Don Reed
1991 20 22 2 4th East Division John Barlowe
1992 18 24 1 4th East Division John Barlowe
1993 22 20 2 4th East Division John Barlowe
1994 20 21 2 3rd East Division John Barlowe
1995 17 24 2 3rd East Division John Barlowe
1996 13 29 2 5th East Division John Barlowe
1997 19 25 0 4th East Division Steve Cohen
1998 21 23 0 4th East Division Scott Pickler
1999 19 23 2 3rd East Division Scott Pickler
2000 21 23 0 5th East Division Scott Pickler
2001 25 19 0 1st East Division (T) Lost semi-finals (Chatham) Scott Pickler
2002 21 20 3 2nd East Division Lost semi-finals (Orleans) Scott Pickler
2003 21 22 1 4th East Division (T) Scott Pickler
2004 26 17 1 1st East Division Won semi-finals (Brewster)
Won championship (Falmouth)
Scott Pickler
2005 20 23 1 4th East Division Scott Pickler
2006 28 16 0 1st East Division Won semi-finals (Brewster)
Won championship (Wareham)
Scott Pickler
2007 31 12 1 1st East Division Won semi-finals (Chatham)
Won championship (Falmouth)
Scott Pickler
2008 18 25 1 5th East Division Scott Pickler
2009 28 15 1 1st East Division Lost semi-finals (Cotuit) Scott Pickler
2010 27 17 0 1st East Division Win round 1 (Harwich)
Won semi-finals (Orleans)
Lost championship (Cotuit)
Scott Pickler
2011 19 21 4 4th East Division Won round 1 (Orleans)
Lost semi-finals (Harwich)
Scott Pickler
2012 25 19 0 2nd East Division Won round 1 (Chatham)
Won semi-finals (Orleans)
Lost championship (Wareham)
Scott Pickler
2013 20 22 2 4th East Division Lost round 1 (Chatham) Scott Pickler
2014 24 19 1 3rd East Division Won round 1 (Orleans)
Won semi-finals (Harwich)
Won championship (Falmouth)
Scott Pickler
2015 22 22 0 3rd East Division (T) Won round 1 (Brewster)
Won semi-finals (Orleans)
Won championship (Hyannis)
Scott Pickler
2016 26 17 1 2nd East Division Won round 1 (Orleans)
Won semi-finals (Chatham)
Won championship (Falmouth)
Scott Pickler
2017 27 16 1 2nd East Division Lost round 1 (Brewster) Scott Pickler
2018 27 12 5 1st East Division Lost round 1 (Brewster) Scott Pickler
2019 22 19 3 3rd East Division Won round 1 (Orleans)
Lost semi-finals (Harwich)
Scott Pickler
2020 Season cancelled due to coronavirus pandemic

League award winnersEdit

 
CCBL Hall of Famer Steve Balboni was league MVP and Outstanding Pro Prospect in 1977
 
Y-D's Stephen Piscotty wore the CCBL batting crown in 2011
 
Y-D's David Robertson was CCBL playoff MVP in 2006
The Pat Sorenti
MVP Award
Year Player
1977 Steve Balboni
1987 Mickey Morandini
1989 Kurt Olson
1991 Brent Killen
The Robert A. McNeece
Outstanding Pro Prospect Award
Year Player
1977 Steve Balboni*
1993 Chris Clemons
2002 Wes Whisler
2014 Phil Bickford
2019 Austin Wells
The BFC Whitehouse
Outstanding Pitcher Award
Year Player
1993 Andy Taulbee
2006 Terry Doyle*
2009 Chris Sale
2017 Kris Bubic
The Russ Ford
Outstanding Relief Pitcher Award
Year Player
2006 Joshua Fields
2007 Nick Cassavechia
2009 Tyler Burgoon
2014 Phil Bickford*
2017 Riley McCauley*


The Daniel J. Silva
Sportsmanship Award
Year Player
1981 Joe Sickles*
1990 Mark Sweeney
2010 Joe Panik
2012 Zak Blair
The Manny Robello
10th Player Award
Year Player
1988 Steve O'Donnell
2000 John Baker
2001 Adam Bourassa
The John J. Claffey Outstanding
New England Player Award
Year Player
2004 Frank Curreri
2009 Mickey Wiswall
2010 Matt Watson
The Thurman Munson Award
for Batting Champion
Year Player
1974 Pete Ross (.357)
1987 Mickey Morandini (.376)
1994 Jon Petke (.379)
1997 Jason McConnell (.345)
2011 Stephen Piscotty (.349)
2012 Patrick Biondi (.388)


All-Star Game MVP Award
Year Player
1977 Steve Balboni
1987 Joe Hall
1997 Edmund Muth
2003 Garrett Mock
2004 Frank Curreri
2009 Chris Sale
2010 Caleb Ramsey
2011 James Ramsey
2012 Alex Blandino
2015 Donnie Walton
All-Star Home Run Hitting
Contest Champion
Year Player
1992 Todd Greene
1996 Eddy Furniss
2000 Jason Cooper
2001 Jason Cooper
The Star of Stars
Playoff MVP Award
Year Player
1989 Mark Sweeney
1990 Kirk Piskor
2004 Ryan Rohlinger*
2004 Joshua Faiola*
2006 David Robertson
2007 Trevor Holder
2014 Walker Buehler*
2014 Marcus Mastrobuoni*
2015 Ben Bowden*
2015 Donnie Walton*
2016 Kevin Smith

(*) - Indicates co-recipient
() - Since 1991, an All-Star Game MVP has been named for each of the league's two divisions.

All-Star Game selectionsEdit

 
Y-D's Matt LaPorta was East Division starting DH at the 2004 CCBL All-Star Game.
 
Joe Panik was a CCBL all-star for Y-D in 2010, and won the league's Sportsmanship Award.
Year Players Ref
1998 Corey Slavic, Daylan Holt, Chris Curry, Chance Capel, Hank Thoms, Edmund Muth [187]
1999 Jamie Rock, Mitch Jones, Jeff Duncan, Bryan Kennedy, Brad Hawpe [188]
2000 J.T. Stotts, Brandon Luna, Cory Sullivan, Jake Gann, Travis Wong, Jason Cooper [189]
2001 Adam Bourassa, Brandon Luna, Hyung Cho, John Baker, Steve Sollmann, Drew Endicott, Jim Brauer, Jason Cooper [190]
2002 Adam Bourassa, Brett Cooley, John Hudgins, Jamie Vermilyea, Wes Whisler [191]
2003 Chris Malec, Hyung Cho, Curtis Thigpen, Sean Gamble, Trevor Crowe, Justin Meier, Jim Brauer, Garrett Mock, Chris Carter [192]
2004 Frank Curreri, Adam Davis, Ryan Rohlinger, Justin Blaine, Justin Keadle, Matt LaPorta [193]
2005 Jeff Kindel, Danny Lehmann, Jordan Abruzzo, Chris Errecart, Tim Gustafson, Brandon Morrow [194]
2006 Buster Posey, Danny Lehmann, Luke Sommer, Brad Emaus, Josh Fields, Terry Doyle, Nate Boman, Donnie Hume [195]
2007 Buster Posey, Jason Castro, Gordon Beckham, Collin Cowgill, Eddie Burns, Sean Ochinko, Nick Cassavechia [196]
2008 Tony Sanchez, Nick Liles, Ryan Ortiz, DeAngelo Mack [197]
2009 Tyler Hanover, Mickey Wiswall, Blake Kelso, Austin Wates, Chris Sale, John Leonard, Tyler Burgoon [198]
2010 Tyler Hanover, Joe Panik, Caleb Ramsey, Jordan Ribera [199]
2011 Stephen Piscotty, James Ramsey, Cody Keefer, Mason Katz [200]
2012 Alex Blandino, Zak Blair, Sam Travis, Tanner Mathis, Robert Pehl, Aaron Blair, Carlos Asuaje, Bryan Verbitsky [201]
2013 Alex Blandino, Cole Peragine, DJ Stewart, Andrew Daniel, Wayne Taylor, James Kaprielian, Dan Savas [202]
2014 Jordan Tarsovich, Rob Fonseca, Andrew Stevenson, Justin Jacome, Phil Bickford [203]
2015 Tommy Edman, Donnie Walton, Cole Billingsley, Gio Brusa, Ricky Thomas [204]
2016 Kevin Smith, Matt Winnaker, Tyler Houston, Bryan Pall [205]
2017 Kris Bubic, Nico Hoerner, Alex McKenna, Kyle Isbel, Brendan Nail, Riley McCauley [206]
2018 Noah Campbell, Andrew Daschbach, Jonny DeLuca, Christian Koss, Quin Cotton, Jensen Elliott, Trent Denholm, Ty Madrigal, Sam Kessler [207]
2019 Noah Campbell, Austin Wells, Riley King, Wyatt Young [208]
2020 Season cancelled due to coronavirus pandemic

Italics - Indicates All-Star Game Home Run Hitting Contest participant

No-hit gamesEdit

Year Pitcher Opponent Score Location Notes Ref
1952 Ted Reynolds North Truro AFS 9–0 [38]
1953 Cal Burlingame Chatham 4–1 [38]
1954 Cal Burlingame Eastham 1–0 [38]
1957 Jerry Rood Brewster 2–0 [177]
1960 Charlie Richards (Dennis) Chatham 9–0 [177]
1961 Dick Cassani Orleans 3–0 Playoff game [49]
1967 Bill Pettingell Bourne [209]
1998 Hank Thoms Orleans 6–0 Eldredge Park [210]
2002 Jim Brauer Chatham 7–0 Veteran's Field [87]
2006 Terry Doyle Chatham 2–0 Red Wilson Field [98]
2010 Jordan Pries Orleans 2–0 Eldredge Park [114]

Managerial historyEdit

 
CCBL Hall of Fame skipper Scott Pickler has led Y-D to six league titles
Manager Seasons Total Seasons Championship Seasons
John Halunen 1958–1963 6 1958, 1960
Charlie Duchesney 1964–1965 2
Merrill "Red" Wilson 1966
1968–1974
1979–1986
16
Lou Lamoriello 1967 1
Bob Stead 1975–1978 4
Brian Sabean 1978 1
Don Reed 1987–1990 4 1989, 1990
John Barlowe 1991–1996 6
Steve Cohen 1997 1
Scott Pickler 1998–2019 22 2004, 2006, 2007, 2014, 2015, 2016

Fan cultureEdit

Red Wilson Field is the official home of the Sinker Burger, the Hurler Burger, and the Boston Screamer. Introduced during the 2004 season, the Sinker is a hamburger served on a lightly toasted cake doughnut, with three varieties: inside, down-the-middle, and outside (cinnamon, powder, and plain). The Hurler, also introduced in 2004, is a hamburger patty served between the halves of a jelly doughnut, finished with a squirt of canned cheese. The Boston Screamer, which made its official debut in 2010, is a hamburger served on a Boston cream doughnut. On July 19, 2011, the Yarmouth–Dennis Red Sox served their 6000th "upgraded" hamburger.[211][212][213]

In popular cultureEdit

  • In the 2001 movie Summer Catch, scenes where the Chatham A's play on the road at Y-D were filmed at Red Wilson Field.
  • The Red Sox hosted the 2006 CCBL All-Star Game, which was broadcast on National Public Radio on Cape Cod. The game was broadcast by the team's play-by-play announcer, Dan Rubin, and the League's Director of Public Relations, John Garner.
  • The Red Sox hosted the CCBL All-Star Game in 2013, which was aired live across the country on Fox College Sports.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit