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Yachiyo (八千代市, Yachiyo-shi) is a city located in Chiba Prefecture, Japan.

Yachiyo

八千代市
Flag of Yachiyo
Flag
Official logo of Yachiyo
Emblem
Location of Yachiyo in Chiba Prefecture
Location of Yachiyo in Chiba Prefecture
Yachiyo is located in Japan
Yachiyo
Yachiyo
 
Coordinates: 35°43′20.7″N 140°05′59.6″E / 35.722417°N 140.099889°E / 35.722417; 140.099889Coordinates: 35°43′20.7″N 140°05′59.6″E / 35.722417°N 140.099889°E / 35.722417; 140.099889
CountryJapan
RegionKantō
PrefectureChiba Prefecture
Government
 • MayorToshiro Toyoda (since December 2003)
Area
 • Total51.39 km2 (19.84 sq mi)
Population
 (December 1, 2015)
 • Total191,853
 • Density3,730/km2 (9,700/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
-TreeAzalea
- FlowerRose
Phone number047-483-1151
Address312-5 Ōwadashinden, Yachiyo-shi, Chiba-ken 276-8501
Websitehttp://www.city.yachiyo.chiba.jp/
Yachiyo City Hall

As of December 1, 2015, the city has an estimated population of 191,853, and a population density of 3,730 persons per km². The total area is 51.39 square kilometres (19.84 sq mi).[1]

GeographyEdit

Yachiyo is located in northwestern Chiba Prefecture on the Shimōsa Plateau.[2] The Shin River, 10 kilometers (6.2 mi) in length, flows through Yachiyo and forms the upper part of the Inba Discharge Channel.[3] Pollution is problematic along the river. Phosphorus, potassium, and nitrogen drain from vegetable farms along the length of the river.[4] A 19 kilometers (12 mi) walking path was built by the city of Yachiyo, and features a pedestrian suspension bridge with an observation platform.[5]

Neighboring municipalitiesEdit

Chiba Prefecture

HistoryEdit

Early historyEdit

Yachiyo has been inhabited since the Japanese Paleolithic period, and archaeologists have found stone tools dating to over 30,000 years ago. The Chiba clan controlled the area of present-day Yachiyo from the late Heian period to the early Muromachi period.[2] In the Sengoku period, the area came under the control of the Murakami clan.

Edo periodEdit

During the Edo period the area was divided between tenryō territory under the direct control of the Tokugawa shogunate and areas controlled under the Sakura Domain.[2] It developed as a post town on the pilgrimage route to the temples at Narita.

Modern historyEdit

After the Meiji Restoration, the villages of Owada in Chiba District and Aso in Inba District, Chiba Prefecture were founded on April 1, 1889. However, much of the area of these villages was already under the control of the Imperial Japanese Army, who had established a training school in 1876 for infantry maneuvers. The school remained an active military installation until 1945. Yachiyo Town was created by the merger of Owada Town with Aso and Mutsu villages in 1954. Yachiyo was elevated to city status on January 1, 1967.

EconomyEdit

Yachiyo is a regional commercial center and a bedroom community for nearby Chiba and Tokyo.[6] There is some residual agriculture, with rice and nashi pears grown. Pearl Musical Instrument Company is located within Yachiyo.

EducationEdit

UniversitiesEdit

High schoolsEdit

  • Yachiyo High School - (Public)
  • Yachiyo Higashi High School - (Public)
  • Yachiyo Nishi High School - (Public)
  • Yachiyo Shoin High School - (Private)
  • Chiba Eiwa High School - (Private)
  • Shumei Yachiyo High School - (Private)

TransportationEdit

Local attractionsEdit

Notable people from YachiyoEdit

Sister city relationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ [1] Yachiyo official home page
  2. ^ a b c d "八千代市 (Yachiyo-shi)". Nihon Daihyakka Zensho (Nipponika) (日本大百科全書(ニッポニカ) (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-25.
  3. ^ "八千代市 (Yachiyo-shi)". Dijitaru daijisen (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-25.
  4. ^ 新川の歴史(in Japanese)
  5. ^ 新川遊歩道(in Japanese)
  6. ^ "Yachiyo". Encyclopedia of Japan. Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-25.
  7. ^ "US-Japan Sister Cities by State". Asia Matters for America. Honolulu, HI: East-West Center. Retrieved 20 November 2015.
  8. ^ "International Exchange". List of Affiliation Partners within Prefectures. Council of Local Authorities for International Relations (CLAIR). Retrieved 21 November 2015.

External linksEdit