Xenic acid is a noble gas compound formed by the dissolution of xenon trioxide in water. Its chemical formula is H2XeO4. It is a very powerful oxidizing agent, and its decomposition is dangerous as it liberates a large amount of gaseous products: xenon, oxygen, and ozone. However, this feature is also what makes xenic acid practically useful in syntheses: there is no chance of introducing impurities to the oxidation products, as all the byproducts can be trivially evaporated.

Xenic acid
Structural formula
Ball-and-stick model of xenic acid
Xenic-acid-3D-vdW.svg
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
Properties
H2XeO4
Molar mass 197.31 g/mol
Related compounds
Related compounds
Perxenic acid
Xenon trioxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Xenic acid has been used as an oxidizing agent in organic chemistry.

Salts of xenic acid are called xenates, containing the HXeO
4
anion. They tend to disproportionate into xenon gas and perxenates:[1]

2 HXeO
4
+ 2 OH
XeO4−
6
+ Xe + O
2
+ 2 H
2
O

The energy given off is sufficient to form ozone from diatomic oxygen:

3 O
2
(g) → 2 O
3
(g)

Salts containing the completely deprotonated anion XeO2−
4
are presently unknown.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Egon Wiberg; Nils Wiberg; Arnold Frederick Holleman (2001). Inorganic chemistry. Academic Press. p. 399. ISBN 0-12-352651-5.

Further readingEdit

  • Bruno Jaselskis, Stanislaus Vas (May 1964). "Xenic Acid Reactions with vic-Diols". J. Am. Chem. Soc. 86 (10): 2078–2079. doi:10.1021/ja01064a041.