World Single Distances Speed Skating Championships

The World Single Distances Speed Skating Championships[1][2][3] are a series of speed skating competitions organised by the International Skating Union.

HistoryEdit

Since the late 19th century, speed skating championships were always decided by racing multiple distances – four different distances for the Allround Championships, and two different distances (which have to be skated twice) for Sprint Championships. However, the speed skating events at the Olympic Games were always individual distances, no medals are awarded for a combined event (the only exception being the 1924 Winter Olympics).

Towards the end of the 20th century, skaters started to specialize and it became rare that a skater was able to dominate both the short and the long distances. Perhaps the last skater able to do so was Eric Heiden, who won all five distances at the 1980 Winter Olympics. As a consequence of this specialization, the difference between the Olympic Games and the regular championships, and the popularity of both the Speed skating World Cup and Single Distance Championships held nationally in several countries, the International Skating Union decided to organise the World Single Distance Championships.

Starting in 1996, this originally was an annual event, but in 1998 it became clear that having World Single Distance Championships and the Single Distance Championships as held at the Winter Olympics during the same year was too much, so since 1999, the World Single Distance Championships are no longer held in (Winter) Olympic years. In 2020 it became clear that having three different World Speed Skating Championships (Allround Championships, Sprint Championships and Single Distances Championships) within each non-Olympic year is difficult as well, so starting since 2021, the World Single Distance Championships are held only in an odd years.

DistancesEdit

The skaters compete in the following distances:

MenEdit

For medal winners, see World Single Distances Speed Skating Championships for Men.

WomenEdit

For medal winners, see World Single Distances Speed Skating Championships for Women.

SummaryEdit

ISU Single Distance Championships
Number Year City Country Events
1 1996 Hamar   Norway 10
2 1997 Warsaw   Poland 10
3 1998 Calgary   Canada 10
4 1999 Heerenveen   Netherlands 10
5 2000 Nagano   Japan 10
6 2001 Salt Lake City   United States 10
7 2003 Berlin   Germany 10
8 2004 Seoul   South Korea 10
9 2005 Inzell   Germany 12
10 2007 Salt Lake City   United States 12
11 2008 Nagano   Japan 12
12 2009 Richmond   Canada 12
13 2011 Inzell   Germany 12
14 2012 Heerenveen   Netherlands 12
15 2013 Sochi   Russia 12
16 2015 Heerenveen   Netherlands 14
17 2016 Kolomna   Russia 14
18 2017 Gangneung   South Korea 14
19 2019 Inzell   Germany 16
20 2020 Salt Lake City   United States 16
21 2021 Heerenveen   Netherlands 14

Medal summaryEdit

The medal table by nations is the total number of the 16 distances (men and women) at all of the 21 championships (1996–2021). The individual tables are about the eight distances by gender.

NationsEdit

All medals, click on the nation to go to the list of medallists.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Netherlands998868255
2  Germany36332796
3  Canada26313895
4  United States22142561
5  Czech Republic166123
6  Russia13162857
7  Japan12172049
8  South Korea1011728
9  Norway913931
10  China39517
11  Austria2125
12  Sweden2103
13  Russian Skating Union13711
14  Kazakhstan1012
15  Italy0628
16  Belgium0224
17  Poland0134
18  France0123
19  Belarus0112
  New Zealand0112
21  Finland0022
Totals (21 nations)252255251758

MenEdit

Top 10, including team pursuit and team sprint. Boldface denotes active skaters and highest medal count among all skaters (including those who are not included in these tables) per type.

Rank Skater Country From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Sven Kramer   Netherlands 2007 2020 21 3 2 26
2 Shani Davis   United States 2004 2015 8 4 3 15
3 Bob de Jong   Netherlands 1997 2013 7 8 5 20
4 Gianni Romme   Netherlands 1996 2004 7 2 3 12
5 Erben Wennemars   Netherlands 1999 2008 6 2 3 11
6 Jorrit Bergsma   Netherlands 2012 2021 5 7 12
7 Carl Verheijen   Netherlands 2001 2009 5 5 3 13
8 Hiroyasu Shimizu   Japan 1996 2005 5 3 2 10
9 Pavel Kulizhnikov   Russia
  Russian Skating Union
2015 2021 5 3 1 9
10 Douwe de Vries   Netherlands 2015 2020 5 1 6

WomenEdit

Top 10, including team pursuit and team sprint. Boldface denotes active skaters and highest medal count among all skaters (including those who are not included in these tables) per type.

Rank Skater Country From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Martina Sáblíková   Czech Republic 2007 2021 16 6 22
2 Ireen Wüst   Netherlands 2007 2021 15 15 1 31
3 Anni Friesinger   Germany 1997 2009 12 9 1 22
4 Gunda Niemann-Stirnemann   Germany 1996 2001 11 3 14
5 Christine Nesbitt   Canada 2007 2013 7 2 3 12
6 Claudia Pechstein   Germany 1996 2017 5 13 12 30
7 Brittany Bowe   United States 2013 2021 4 3 4 11
8 Antoinette de Jong   Netherlands 2016 2021 4 3 2 9
9 Monique Garbrecht-Enfeldt   Germany 1999 2003 4 2 6
10 Irene Schouten   Netherlands 2015 2021 4 4 8

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "ISU World Single Distances Speed Skating Championships 2016, Kolomna, Russia" (PDF). ISU.org. International Skating Union. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 March 2016.
  2. ^ "ISU World Single Distances Speed Skating Championships 2017, Gangneung, Korea" (PDF). ISU.org. International Skating Union. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 February 2017.
  3. ^ "ISU World Single Distances Speed Skating Championships, 2019 Inzell, Germany". ISU.org. International Skating Union. Retrieved 12 July 2018.