World Para Athletics European Championships

The World Para Athletics European Championships (European Para Athletics Championships), known prior to 2018 as the IPC Athletics European Championships is an event organized by World Para Athletics, the international athletics federation established under the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) in 2016.[1] Athletes with a physical disability compete, and there is also a specific category for athletes with an intellectual disability. Organised biennially, the original Games ran from 2003-2005 as an Open Championship but the event was frozen in 2005, but returned in 2012 in Stadskanaal, Netherlands.

World Para Athletics European Championships
World Para Athletics logo.svg
SportAthletics
Founded2003
ContinentEuropean (IPC)

The first IPC Athletics European Championships was held in Assen, Netherlands in 2003 as an Open Championship.[2]

[3]

ChampionshipsEdit

Edition Year City Country Date Venue No. of
Events
No. of
Athletes
Best Nation
IPC Athletics European Championships
1 2003 (details) Assen[4]   Netherlands 15 – 21 Jun Stadsbroek sports park 215 700   Germany
2 2005 (details) Espoo[5]   Finland 22 – 27 August Leppävaara stadium +150 750   United Kingdom
3 2012 (details) Stadskanaal   Netherlands 24 – 28 June Stadskanaal Stadium 144 550   Russia
4 2014 (details) Swansea[6]   United Kingdom 18 – 23 August Swansea University Stadium 193 550   Russia
5 2016 (details) Grosseto[7]   Italy 10 – 16 June Stadio Olimpico Carlo Zecchini 171 700   Russia
World Para Athletics European Championships
6 2018 (details) Berlin[8]   Germany 20 – 26 August Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Sportpark 182 600   Poland
7 2021 (details) Bydgoszcz[9]   Poland 1 – 5 June Zdzisław Krzyszkowiak Stadium 157 670   Russia
Host cities of the games through 2016

ResultsEdit

  1. https://www.team-thomas.org/res03/resectotal.html - 2003 (it:Campionati europei di atletica leggera paralimpica 2003)
  2. https://web.archive.org/web/20160329210227/www.fsrim.org.mk/images/stories/rezultati/2005/ipc_espoo%202005.pdf - 2005 (it:Campionati europei di atletica leggera paralimpica 2005)
  3. https://www.paralympic.org/stadskanaal-2012 - 2012
  4. https://www.paralympic.org/swansea-2014 - 2014
  5. https://www.paralympic.org/grosseto-2016 - 2016
  6. https://www.paralympic.org/berlin-2018 - 2018
  7. https://www.paralympic.org/bydgoszcz-2021/results - 2021

ClassificationEdit

  • F = field athletes.
  • T = track athletes.
  • P = pentathlon.
  • 11-13 – visually impaired, 11 and 12 compete with a sighted guide.
  • 20 – intellectual disability.
  • 31-38 – cerebral palsy or other conditions that affect muscle co-ordination and control. Athletes in class 31-34 compete in a seated position; athletes in class 35-38 compete standing.
  • 41-46 – amputation, les autres.
  • 51-58 – wheelchair athletes.

Medal tableEdit

As of 2021.[10][11][12][13][14][15]

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Russia171154103428
2  Great Britain1158498297
3  Poland1049591290
4  Ukraine1048063247
5  Germany9212470286
6  France705956185
7  Spain526469185
8   Switzerland482944121
9  Finland39151670
10  Netherlands344527106
11  Greece304041111
12  Czech Republic283447109
13  Belarus26332584
14  Turkey22222367
15  Ireland22141854
16  Portugal20433093
17  Italy20283886
18  Lithuania20191453
19  Bulgaria18192461
20  Austria15221350
21  Croatia15142251
22  Sweden14161242
23  Serbia14131744
24  Latvia1261634
25  Denmark1116835
26  Azerbaijan108725
27  Slovakia6121129
28  Belgium69924
29  Iceland54716
30  Hungary451019
31  Norway39416
32  Cyprus2406
33  Slovenia22610
34  Montenegro1315
35  Romania1023
36  Estonia1001
37  Luxembourg0516
38  Serbia and Montenegro0224
39  Yugoslavia0112
40  Moldova0101
41  Israel0055
42  Bosnia and Herzegovina0011
Totals (42 nations)1157115310523362

* In the 2005 IPC Athletics European Championships, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Iran, Japan, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates were all guests in the championships and have won medals for their country respectively.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ World Para Athletics - About, from Paralympic.org, the official website of the IPC.
  2. ^ "History". paralympic.org. Retrieved 6 August 2013.
  3. ^ "World Para Athletics 2020 season: Status update". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 8 June 2020.
  4. ^ "Entry Deadline Approaching for Athletics Europeans". paralympic.org. 27 April 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  5. ^ Burnett, Mike (16 August 2005). "Forget Helsinki". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  6. ^ "Swansea to host 2014 IPC European Athletics Championships". athleticsweekly.com. 22 March 2013. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  7. ^ "Grosseto 2016: About us". paralympic.org. Retrieved 18 May 2016.
  8. ^ "IPC chooses Berlin to stage 2018 European Championships". BBC Sport. 16 July 2016. Retrieved 18 July 2016.
  9. ^ "Bydgoszcz to host 2020 European Championships". World Para Athletics. 25 June 2019.
  10. ^ "2003 European Athletics Championships Results (in German)". teamthomas.org.de. 4 February 2019.
  11. ^ "2005 European Athletics Championships Results" (PDF). fsrim.org.mk. 5 February 2019.
  12. ^ "2012 IPC Athletics European Championships - Official Results Book" (PDF). International Paralympic Committee. 29 June 2012.
  13. ^ "2016 IPC Athletics European Championships" (PDF). International Paralympic Committee. 16 June 2016.
  14. ^ "Berlin 2018 Medal Count". International Paralympic Committee. 6 February 2019.
  15. ^ "Medal Standings Bydgoszcz 2021" (PDF). World Para Athletics. 6 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)