World Autism Awareness Day

World Autism Awareness Day is an internationally recognized day annually on April 2nd, encouraging Member States of the United Nations to take measures to raise awareness about people with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) throughout the world.[1][2] It was designated by the United Nations General Assembly resolution (A/RES/62/139).[3] World Autism Awareness Day", passed in council on November 1, 2007, and adopted on December 18, 2007. It was proposed by Mozah Bint Nasser Al-Missned, the United Nations Representative from Qatar and consort to Emir Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani, and supported by all member states.[4][5][6][7]

World Autism Awareness Day
Organizador de Autismo en La Moneda.jpg
A World Autism Awareness Day event in Santiago, Chile in 2013
Official nameWorld Autism Awareness Day
Observed byUnited Nations member states
DateApril 2
Next timeApril 2, 2023 (2023-04-02)
Frequencyannual

This resolution was passed and adopted without a vote in the UN General Assembly, mainly as a supplement to previous UN initiatives to improve human rights.[6]

World Autism Day is one of only seven official health-specific UN Days.[8] The day itself brings individual autism organizations together all around the world to aid in things like research, diagnoses, treatment, and acceptance for those with a developmental path affected by autism.

The terms "Autism Awareness Day" and "Autism Awareness Month" are often contested by autism rights advocates, who claim that they feed into perceived ableism against autistic people. Such groups, including the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, advocate using the term "Autism Acceptance day" as an alternative for both events under the belief that it promotes overcoming anti-autism prejudice rather than simply increasing awareness of autism.[9][10]

ComponentsEdit

The original resolution had four main components:

ThemesEdit

As of 2012, each World Autism Awareness Day has focused on a specific theme determined by the UN.

Onesie WednesdayEdit

In 2014, WAAD coincided with Onesie Wednesday, a day created by the National Autistic Society to encourage people in England, Wales and Northern Ireland to show their support for anyone on the autistic spectrum. By wearing a onesie or pajamas, participants are saying, "it's all right to be different".[24]

Outcomes in the United StatesEdit

In a 2015 Presidential Proclamation, President Obama highlighted some of the initiatives that the US government was taking to bring rights to those with autism and to bring awareness to the disorder. He highlighted things like The Affordable Care Act, which prohibits health insurance companies from denying coverage based on a pre-existing condition such as autism. He also pointed out the recent Autism CARES Act of 2014, which provides higher level training for those who are serving citizens on the autism spectrum.[25]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "WHEN IS WORLD AUTISM AWARENESS DAY". Business Standard India. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  2. ^ "Autism (Autism Spectrum Disorder – ASD): The Definitive Guide – What is Autism Awareness?". Otsimo. 29 April 2020. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  3. ^ Nations, United. "World Autism Awareness Day – background". United Nations. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  4. ^ "Third Committee Calls on Assembly to Designate 2 April World Autism Day | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases". www.un.org. Retrieved 6 November 2015.
  5. ^ "General Assembly Adopts Landmark Text Calling for Moratorium on Death Penalty | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases". www.un.org. Retrieved 6 November 2015.
  6. ^ a b "United Nations Marks First World Autism Awareness Day Today | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases". www.un.org. Retrieved 6 November 2015.
  7. ^ "World Autism Awareness Day 2017". jobsmedia.org. Retrieved 19 October 2017.
  8. ^ "UN – Global Issues – Health". www.un.org. Retrieved 25 March 2017.
  9. ^ S., Kassiane (4 April 2012). "Acceptance vs. Awareness". Autistic Self Advocacy Network. Retrieved 2 April 2021.
  10. ^ Bullus, Erin; Sesterka, Abby (1 April 2020). "Moving Beyond Autism Awareness to Autism Acceptance". Psychology Today. Thomas, John. Retrieved 2 April 2021.
  11. ^ "Facts & Myths about Autism – Autism Awareness Day 2017 – Belair Daily". www.belairdaily.com. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  12. ^ "United Nations General Assembly" (PDF). Autism Speaks. 21 January 2008.
  13. ^ "World Autism Awareness Day, 2 April". www.un.org. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  14. ^ "World Autism Awareness Day, 2 April". www.un.org. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  15. ^ "World Autism Awareness Day, 2 April". www.un.org. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  16. ^ "World Autism Awareness Day, 2 April". www.un.org. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  17. ^ "World Autism Awareness Day, 2 April | United Nations Enable". www.un.org. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  18. ^ "Toward Autonomy and Self-Determination – World Autism Awareness Day 2017". United Nations Web TV. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  19. ^ "2018 World Autism Awareness Day". www.un.org. Archived from the original on 31 March 2018. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  20. ^ "World Autism Awareness Day 2018". www.un.org. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  21. ^ Nations, United. "World Autism Awareness Day – EN". United Nations. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  22. ^ Nations, United. "World Autism Awareness Day – EN". United Nations. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  23. ^ "World Autism Awareness Day - EN".
  24. ^ "About Onesie Wednesday". National Autistic Society. Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  25. ^ "Presidential Proclamation – World Autism Awareness Day, 2015". whitehouse.gov. April 2015. Retrieved 10 November 2015 – via National Archives.