FINA World Aquatics Championships

  (Redirected from World Aquatics Championships)

The FINA World Championships or World Aquatics Championships are the World Championships for aquatics sports: swimming, diving, high diving, open water swimming, artistic swimming, and water polo. They are run by FINA, and all swimming events are contested in a long course (50-metre) pool.

FINA World Aquatics Championships
FINA flag.svg
Flag of FINA
Statusactive
Genresporting event
Date(s)mid-year
Frequencybiennial
Location(s)various
Inaugurated1973 (1973)
Most recentBudapest 2022
Previous eventGwangju 2019
Next eventFukuoka 2023
Organised byFINA

The event was first held in 1973 in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, and is now held every two years. From 1978 to 1998, the World Championships were held every four years, in the even years between Summer Olympic years. From 2001 until 2019, the Championships have been held every two years, in the odd years.

Due to the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic, the scheduling of both the Olympic Games and the Championships between 2019 and 2025 became somewhat erratic, with World Championships not taking place in Japan in 2021 to accommodate the delayed 2020 Summer Olympics, and then delayed again to 2023 because of pandemic-related issues in Japan. As a result, an extraordinary edition of the event was announced for 2022 in Budapest, Hungary, so as not to leave a four year gap between World Championships. As a result, World Championships will be held in four consecutive years for the first time – 2022 in Budapest,Hungary, 2023 in Fukuoka,Japan (the original 2021 event hosts, delayed thrice), 2024 in Qatar (moved to 2024 from the original 2023 event, then moved again to January to accommodate the 2024 Summer Olympics), and 2025 in a place to be announced. This will also mean there will be six global championships in the space of four years (mid 2021 - to mid 2025). The circle resumes with Budapest hosting the event again in 2027.

Athletes from all 209 FINA members could take part in the competition. In 2019, records were set for the most countries participating, with 192 members, and the most athletes participating, with 2,623 athletes.[1]

ChampionshipsEdit

Year Dates Edition Location Athletes Events Events Details Winner Second Third Most Medals
1973 31 August – 9 September 1   Belgrade, Yugoslavia 686 37 18 (M), 19 (W)   United States   East Germany   Italy   United States
1975 19–27 July 2   Cali, Colombia 682 37 18 (M), 19 (W)   United States   East Germany   Hungary   United States
1978 20–28 August 3   West Berlin, West Germany 828 37 18 (M), 19 (W)   United States*   Soviet Union   Canada   United States
1982 29 July – 8 August 4   Guayaquil, Ecuador 848 37 18 (M), 19 (W)   United States   East Germany   Soviet Union   United States
1986 13–23 August 5   Madrid, Spain 1119 41 19 (M), 22 (W)   East Germany   United States   Canada   United States
1991 3–13 January 6   Perth, Australia 1142 45 21 (M), 24 (W)   United States   China   Hungary   United States
1994 1–11 September 7   Rome, Italy 1400 45 21 (M), 24 (W)   China   United States   Russia   China
1998 8–17 January 8   Perth, Australia 1371 53 24 (M), 27 (W), 2 (X)   United States   Russia   Australia   United States
2001 16–29 July 9   Fukuoka, Japan 1498 61 29 (M), 32 (W)   Australia   China   United States   United States
2003 12–27 July 10   Barcelona, Spain 2015 62 29 (M), 33 (W)   United States   Russia   Australia   United States
2005 16–31 July 11   Montreal, Canada 1784 62 29 (M), 33 (W)   United States   Australia   China   United States
2007 18 March – 1 April 12   Melbourne, Australia 2158 65 29 (M), 36 (W)   United States   Russia   Australia   United States
2009 17 July – 2 August 13   Rome, Italy 2556 65 29 (M), 36 (W)   United States   China   Russia   United States and
  China
2011 16–31 July 14   Shanghai, China 2220 66 29 (M), 36 (W), 1 (X)   United States   China   Russia   China
2013 19 July – 4 August 15   Barcelona, Spain[2][3][4] 2293 68 30 (M), 37 (W), 1 (X)   United States   China   Russia   United States
2015 24 July – 9 August 16   Kazan, Russia[5] 2400 75 30 (M), 37 (W), 8 (X)   China   United States   Russia   China
2017 14–30 July 17   Budapest, Hungary[6] 2360 75 30 (M), 37 (W), 8 (X)   United States   China   Russia   United States**
2019 12–28 July[7] 18   Gwangju, South Korea 2623 76 30 (M), 38 (W), 8 (X)   China   United States   Russia   United States
2022 18 June – 3 July[8] 19   Budapest, Hungary[9] 2034 74 29 (M), 37 (W), 8 (X)
2023 14–30 July[10] 20   Fukuoka, Japan[11]
2024 January[12] 21   Doha, Qatar
2025 22   Kazan, Russia[13]
2027 23   Budapest, Hungary[13]

* Record by number of gold medals –   United States (23 gold medals, 1978)
** Record by number of total medals –   United States (46 medals in total, 2017)

All-time medal tableEdit

Updated after Day 12 of the 2022 World Aquatics Championships.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  United States285216166667
2  China15510880343
3  Russia1057362240
4  Australia9510677278
5  East Germany514427122
6  Italy444264150
7  Hungary403030100
8  Germany376166164
9  Great Britain302649105
10  France28312988
11  Canada264959134
12  Netherlands18363084
13  Sweden17201754
14  Soviet Union16282872
15  Brazil16151748
16  Japan144572131
17  Ukraine12162755
18  South Africa1261634
19  Spain9352771
20  West Germany871227
21  Poland610925
22  Denmark48820
23  Greece45716
24  Zimbabwe4509
25  Serbia4217
26  Romania41712
27  Finland3227
28  Croatia2349
29  Tunisia2248
30  Lithuania2237
31  Belarus2136
  Yugoslavia2136
33  South Korea2125
34  Mexico181322
35  Switzerland1517
36  Norway1214
37  Malaysia1157
38  Bulgaria1146
39  Belgium1124
  Costa Rica1124
  FR Yugoslavia /
  Serbia and Montenegro
1124
  North Korea1124
43  Colombia1001
  Suriname1001
45  New Zealand05611
46  Austria0358
47  Slovakia0325
48  Czech Republic0303
49  Cuba0112
  Czechoslovakia0112
  Iceland0112
  Jamaica0112
53  Ecuador0101
  Montenegro0101
55  Egypt0033
56  Argentina0022
  Singapore0022
58  Puerto Rico0011
  Trinidad and Tobago0011
  Venezuela0011
Totals (60 nations)1070107810673215

Multiple medalistsEdit

Boldface denotes active athletes and highest medal count per type.

Rank Athlete Country Gender Discipline From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Michael Phelps   United States M Swimming 2001 2011 26 6 1 33
2 Svetlana Romashina   Russia F Synchronised swimming 2005 2019 21 21
3 Katie Ledecky   United States F Swimming 2013 2022 19 3 22
4 Natalia Ishchenko   Russia F Synchronised swimming 2005 2015 19 2 21
5 Ryan Lochte   United States M Swimming 2005 2015 18 5 4 27
6 Svetlana Kolesnichenko   Russia F Synchronised swimming 2011 2019 16 16
7 Caeleb Dressel   United States M Swimming 2017 2022 15 2 17
8 Alla Shishkina   Russia F Synchronised swimming 2009 2019 14 14
9 Anastasia Davydova   Russia F Synchronised swimming 2001 2011 13 1 14
10 Alexandra Patskevich   Russia F Synchronised swimming 2009 2017 13 13

DisciplinesEdit

Except as noted below, there are male and female categories for each event.

SwimmingEdit

Distance Free Back Breast Fly I.M. Free relay Medley relay Mixed free relay Mixed medley relay
50 m
100 m
200 m
400 m
800 m
1500 m

DivingEdit

Men's and women's events:

  • 1 m springboard
  • 3 m springboard
  • 10 m platform
  • synchronized 3 m springboard
  • synchronized 10 m platform

Mixed events added at the 2015 World Aquatics Championships:

  • synchronized 3 m springboard
  • synchronized 10 m platform
  • 3 m springboard / 10 m platform team

High divingEdit

  • 27m (men only)
  • 20m (women only)

High diving included since the 15th FINA World Aquatics Championships in 2013 in Barcelona but were droped at the 2022 championiship due the lack of suitable venues.

Open water swimmingEdit

  • 5 km
  • 10 km
  • 25 km
  • Mixed Team

Open water swimming was first held at the 1991 FINA World Championships.

Synchronized swimmingEdit

Except for Free Combination and Highlight, all events include technical and free routines, with medals awarded separately.

Water poloEdit

  • Men's tournament
  • Women's tournament

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ "18th FINA World Championships: Entry List by Event" (PDF). Omega Timing. Retrieved 17 November 2019.
  2. ^ Originally awarded in July 2009 to Dubai, UAE. Dubai withdrew in March 2010.
  3. ^ PR54 – Dubai (UAE) will be the Organising City Archived 27 April 2015 at the Wayback Machine (FINA Press Release #2009–54); published by FINA on 2009-07-18, retrieved 2009-07-20.
  4. ^ Press Release 2013–51: Barcelona 2013: new record of participation with 181 nations in Barcelona (ESP) Archived 14 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine. Published by FINA on 2013-07-18; retrieved 2013-07-19.
  5. ^ UPDATE 1-Swimming-Celebrations as Kazan awarded 2015 world champs published by Reuters on 2011-07-15.
  6. ^ "Budapest (HUN) to host FINA World Championships in 2017" (Press release). FINA. 11 March 2015. Archived from the original on 27 August 2015. Retrieved 2015-08-31.
  7. ^ FINA.org
  8. ^ "Press Release | FINA announces changes to international events calendar". FINA. 7 February 2022. Retrieved 7 February 2022.
  9. ^ "Press Release | FINA announces changes to international events calendar". FINA. 7 February 2022. Retrieved 7 February 2022.
  10. ^ "Press Release | FINA announces changes to international events calendar". FINA. 7 February 2022. Retrieved 7 February 2022.
  11. ^ "Press Release | FINA announces changes to international events calendar". FINA. 7 February 2022. Retrieved 7 February 2022.
  12. ^ "Press Release | FINA announces changes to international events calendar". FINA. 1 February 2022. Retrieved 1 February 2022.
  13. ^ a b "PR 59 – Kazan 2025 and Budapest 2027, hosts of the FINA showcase". FINA. 21 July 2019. Retrieved 11 February 2022.

External linksEdit

  Media related to World Aquatics Championships at Wikimedia Commons