Women's Twenty20

  (Redirected from Women's Twenty20 cricket)

Women's Twenty20 is the use of the Twenty20 match format in women's cricket. In a Twenty20 match, the two teams bat for a single innings each, of a maximum of 20 overs. The wider rules and playing conditions are usually the same for both the men's format and the women's format, with some small variations.

The first women's Twenty20 matches took place concurrently on 29 May 2004, as part of the 2004 Super Fours: Braves versus Super Strikers and Knight Riders versus V Team.[1] These matches were viewed as a warm-up for the first ever Women's Twenty20 International (and first ever T20I for either gender), that took place at Hove on 5 August 2004 between England and New Zealand.[2]

Most major cricket nations now have a women's Twenty20 cricket tournament as part of their domestic season. In 2007, the first Women's Interstate Twenty20 began in Australia and the State League Twenty20 began in New Zealand. With the beginning of the Women's Big Bash League in Australia in 2015–16 and the Women's Cricket Super League in England in 2016, domestic women's Twenty20 tournaments started becoming more professionalised.[3][4] In 2022, the first privately-run women's T20 competition was launched, the 2022 FairBreak Invitational T20.[5]

At international level, Twenty20 cricket has been an increasingly prevalent format for women. The first ICC Women's World Twenty20 was held in England in 2009, and was won by the hosts. The most recent edition took place in Australia in 2020, with the final being the most watched women's cricket event ever worldwide, and with 86,174 watching in person at the MCG.[6][7]

StatusEdit

In October 2017, the International Cricket Council (ICC) confirmed updated regulations for Classification of Official Cricket. It defined and clarified what constitutes Official Cricket and what does not. According to these regulations, Competitive Women's Cricket is considered as the highest level of domestic women's cricket. The main features of the new regulations on what constitutes Competitive Women's T20 Cricket and what do not are as follows.[8][9]

Matches that qualify as Competitive Women's T20 CricketEdit

  • Twenty20 women's cricket matches played either at state or provincial level or official matches of a touring Test team against state, or provincial level teams, or franchise based teams or competitions, substantially conforming to ICC standard playing conditions and accorded the status of Competitive Women's Cricket by the relevant governing bodies.

Matches that do not qualify as Competitive Women's T20 CricketEdit

  • Matches between the 'A' teams, national academy or age group teams of member countries.
  • All other women's cricket matches played as part of a competition or tournament held under the auspices of a member including club cricket, schools, age groups and university cricket.

Match format and rulesEdit

Women's Twenty20 cricket mainly follows the same rules as men's Twenty20 cricket. Twenty20 matches are a form of limited overs cricket, with both teams batting for a single innings of 20 overs (120 legal deliveries). The team with the most runs at the conclusion of both innings is the winner of the match.

Some small differences exist between the women's and men's formats: for example, ICC rules state that during non-Powerplay overs in women's matches, 4 fielders are permitted outside the fielding circle, compared to 5 in the men's game. Boundaries are also smaller in the women's game, with the rules dictating that they should be between 60 and 70 yards, compared to 65 and 90 yards in the men's game.[10][11]

InternationalEdit

Women's Twenty20 Internationals have been played since 2004. To date, 70 nations have played the format.[12]

Nation Date of women's T20I debut
  Argentina 3 October 2019
  Australia 2 September 2005
  Austria 31 July 2019
  Bahrain 20 March 2022
  Bangladesh 27 August 2012
  Belgium 25 September 2021
  Belize 13 December 2019
  Bhutan 13 January 2019
  Botswana 20 August 2018
  Brazil 23 August 2018
  Cameroon 12 September 2021
  Canada 17 May 2019
  Chile 23 August 2018
  China 3 November 2018
  Costa Rica 26 April 2019
  England 5 August 2004
  Eswatini 9 September 2021
  Fiji 6 May 2019
  France 31 July 2019
  Gambia 29 March 2022
  Germany 26 June 2019
  Ghana 28 March 2022
  Guernsey 31 May 2019
  Hong Kong 12 January 2019
  India 5 August 2006
  Indonesia 12 January 2019
  Ireland 27 June 2008
  Italy 9 August 2021
  Japan 6 May 2019
  Jersey 31 May 2019
  Kenya 6 April 2019
  Kuwait 18 February 2019
  Lesotho 20 August 2018
  Malawi 20 August 2018
  Malaysia 3 June 2018
  Maldives 2 December 2019
  Mali 18 June 2019
  Mexico 23 August 2018
  Mozambique 20 August 2018
  Myanmar 12 January 2019
  Namibia 20 August 2018
    Nepal 12 January 2019
  Netherlands 27 June 2008
  New Zealand 5 August 2004
  Nigeria 26 January 2019
  Norway 31 July 2019
  Oman 17 January 2020
  Pakistan 25 May 2009
  Papua New Guinea 7 July 2018
  Peru 3 October 2019
  Philippines 21 December 2019
  Qatar 17 January 2020
  Rwanda 26 January 2019
  Samoa 6 May 2019
  Saudi Arabia 20 March 2022
  Scotland 7 July 2018
  Sierra Leone 20 August 2018
  Singapore 9 August 2018
  South Africa 10 August 2007
  South Korea 3 November 2018
  Sri Lanka 12 June 2009
  Sweden 29 August 2021
  Tanzania 6 May 2019
  Thailand 3 June 2018
  Uganda 7 July 2018
  United Arab Emirates 7 July 2018
  United States 17 May 2019
  Vanuatu 6 May 2019
  West Indies 27 June 2008
  Zimbabwe 5 January 2019

WT20I rankingsEdit

In January 2018, the ICC granted international status to all matches between associate nations, with plans to create a WT20I rankings system. The rankings were launched in October 2018.[13]

ICC Women's T20I Rankings
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1   Australia 21 6,160 293
2   England 26 7,398 285
3   New Zealand 18 4,801 267
4   India 27 7,013 260
5   South Africa 23 5,707 248
6   West Indies 19 4,691 247
7   Pakistan 21 4,789 228
8   Sri Lanka 18 3,671 204
9   Bangladesh 15 2,850 190
10   Thailand 17 2,851 168
11   Ireland 23 3,768 164
12   Zimbabwe 24 3,803 158
13   Scotland 20 3,036 152
14   United Arab Emirates 24 3,163 132
15   Papua New Guinea 9 1,174 130
16   Samoa 6 749 125
17   Tanzania 20 2,383 119
18     Nepal 24 2,784 116
19   Uganda 32 31,25 98
20   Namibia 29 2,789 96
21   Netherlands 15 1,396 93
22   Indonesia 9 761 85
23   Kenya 24 1,996 83
24   Hong Kong 22 1,711 78
25   China 8 538 67
26   Sweden 6 387 65
27   United States 10 623 62
28   Jersey 10 618 62
29   Malaysia 22 1,326 60
30   Vanuatu 6 324 54
31   Rwanda 34 1,822 54
32   Germany 24 1,263 53
33   Japan 5 260 52
34   Brazil 17 801 47
35   Belize 3 135 45
36   Nigeria 30 1,302 43
37   Myanmar 5 212 42
38   Canada 8 277 35
39   France 16 431 27
40   Sierra Leone 11 263 24
41   Oman 13 290 22
42   Austria 18 389 22
43   Botswana 22 460 21
44   Bhutan 11 217 20
45   Kuwait 19 359 19
46   South Korea 4 73 18
47   Malawi 4 71 18
48   Bahrain 8 138 17
49   Qatar 14 218 16
50   Mexico 3 42 14
51   Costa Rica 4 34 9
52   Singapore 7 43 6
53   Norway 8 47 6
54   Mozambique 11 31 3
55   Fiji 6 0 0
56   Mali 3 0 0
57   Argentina 9 0 0
References: ICC Women's T20I Rankings, ESPNcricinfo, Updated on 27 June 2022

Domestic T20 leaguesEdit

The following is a list of the premier T20 domestic competition in full member countries.

Nations Tournament Period Current Trophy Holder
  Australia Women's Big Bash League 2015–present Perth Scorchers
  England Charlotte Edwards Cup 2021–present Southern Vipers
  India Women's T20 Challenge 2018–present IPL Supernovas
  Ireland Women's Super Series 2015–present Scorchers
  New Zealand Women's Super Smash 2007–present Wellington Blaze
  Pakistan PCB Triangular Twenty20 2020–present PCB Challengers
  South Africa Women's T20 Super League 2019–present Coronations
  Sri Lanka Women's Super Provincial T20 Tournament 2019–present Dambulla District
  West Indies Twenty20 Blaze 2012–present Jamaica
  Zimbabwe Women's T20 Cup 2020–present Eagles

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Women's Super Fours squads announced". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  2. ^ "International Twenty20 cricket on the cards". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  3. ^ "Eight teams announced for Women's BBL". Cricket.com.au. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  4. ^ "ECB announces plan to launch Women's Cricket Super League next year". The Guardian. 18 June 2015. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  5. ^ "First-of-its-kind women's T20 event to bring together players from 35 countries". ESPNcricinfo. 6 April 2022. Retrieved 1 May 2022.
  6. ^ "Women's T20 World Cup becomes most watched women's cricket event ever". SportsPro. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  7. ^ "Alyssa Healy, Beth Mooney, Jess Jonassen hand clinical Australia fifth T20 World Cup title". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  8. ^ "ICC Classification of Official Cricket" (PDF). International Cricket Council. 1 October 2017. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  9. ^ "Classification of Official Cricket" (PDF). Mumbai Cricket. Retrieved 29 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ "ICC Women's Twenty20 International Playing Conditions" (PDF). International Cricket Council. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  11. ^ "ICC Men's Twenty20 International Playing Conditions" (PDF). International Cricket Council. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  12. ^ "Records/Women's Twenty20 Internationals/Team Records/Result Summary". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  13. ^ "ICC Launches Global Women's T20I Team Rankings". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 13 October 2018.