Wisconsin Timber Rattlers

The Wisconsin Timber Rattlers are a Minor League Baseball team of the High-A Central and the High-A affiliate of the Milwaukee Brewers. They are located in Grand Chute, Wisconsin, a town on the outskirts of Appleton in the Fox Cities, and are named for the timber rattlesnake, which is more commonly found in southwest Wisconsin. The team plays their home games at Neuroscience Group Field at Fox Cities Stadium, which opened in 1995. They previously played at Goodland Field from their founding in 1958 until the end of the 1994 season.

Wisconsin Timber Rattlers
Founded in 1958
Grand Chute, Wisconsin
WisconsinTimberRattlersLogo.PNG WisconsinTimberRattlersCapLogo.png
Team logo Cap insignia
Minor league affiliations
ClassHigh-A (2021–present)
Previous classes
LeagueHigh-A Central (2021–present)
DivisionWest Division
Previous leagues
Major league affiliations
TeamMilwaukee Brewers (2009–present)
Previous teams
Minor league titles
League titles (10)
  • 1960
  • 1964
  • 1966
  • 1967
  • 1969
  • 1978
  • 1982
  • 1983
  • 1984
  • 2012
Division titles (11)
  • 1971
  • 1972
  • 1974
  • 1978
  • 1983
  • 1984
  • 1985
  • 1996
  • 1999
  • 2005
  • 2012
First half titles (10)
  • 1966
  • 1969
  • 1971
  • 1978
  • 1992
  • 1996
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 2005
  • 2012
Second half titles (10)
  • 1964
  • 1967
  • 1969
  • 1971
  • 1972
  • 1974
  • 1999
  • 2000
  • 2001
  • 2005
Wild card berths (4)
  • 1982
  • 2003
  • 2014
  • 2016
Team data
NameWisconsin Timber Rattlers (1995–present)
Previous names
  • Appleton Foxes (1967–1994)
  • Fox Cities Foxes (1958–1966)
ColorsBurgundy, tan, black, silver, white
         
MascotFang
BallparkNeuroscience Group Field at Fox Cities Stadium (1995–present)
Previous parks
Goodland Field (1958–1994)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Third Base Ventures[1]
PresidentRob Zerjav[2]
General ManagerRob Zerjav[2]
ManagerMatt Erickson

Originally known as the Fox Cities Foxes, the team began play in 1958 as members of the Three–I League. The circuit suspended operations after the 1961 season, so the club joined the Midwest League in 1962. They became known as the Appleton Foxes in 1967 and adopted their Wisconsin Timber Rattlers moniker in 1995. In conjunction with Major League Baseball's reorganization of Minor League Baseball in 2021, Wisconsin was shifted to the High-A Central.

Wisconsin has served as a farm club for six Major League Baseball franchises. They have won ten league titles, including one Three–I League League championship and nine Midwest League championships, most recently in 2012. As of the cancellation of the 2020 season, they have played 8,284 regular season games and compiled a win–loss record of 4,159–4,125. They have a postseason record of 60–46. Combining all 8,390 regular season and postseason games, the Timber Rattlers have an all-time record of 4,219–4,171.

HistoryEdit

Prior professional baseball in AppletonEdit

Appleton, the largest of Wisconsin's Fox Cities, has hosted Minor League Baseball teams since the late 19th century. The city's professional baseball history dates back to 1891 with the formation of the Appleton Papermakers in the single-season Wisconsin State League.[3] The city was home to a new Papermakers team in the Wisconsin–Illinois League from 1909 to 1914.[3] The Wisconsin State League was revived in 1940 with the Papermakers as members from 1940 to 1942 and 1946 to 1953 when the team and its league disbanded.[3]

Washington Senators (1958–1959)Edit

In 1958, the Fox Cities Foxes joined the Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League, popularly known as the Three–I League, as the Class B affiliate of the Washington Senators.[3][4] Their home ballpark was Goodland Field in Appleton.[5] This team was owned and operated by Appleton Baseball Club, Inc., a non-stock and nonprofit organization. Governed by a volunteer board of directors, this entity continued to own and operate the franchise through 2020.[1]

The Foxes played their inaugural game on the road against the Davenport DavSox on April 27, 1958, a 9–2 victory.[6] Their first home game, a 6–0 win over the Cedar Rapids Braves, was played on May 3.[7] The Senators affiliation ended after two seasons with the Foxes having a 115–140 record over that period.[4]

Baltimore Orioles (1960–1965)Edit

 
Earl Weaver managed the 1960 Foxes to win the Three–I League championship.

Prior to the 1960 season, the team became an affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles.[3] Managed by future Baseball Hall of Famer Earl Weaver,[8] they won the Three–I League championship pennant with a league-best 82–56 record in their first season with the Orioles.[9] Third baseman Pete Ward was selected as the league's Most Valuable Player, and first baseman Boog Powell won the Rookie of the Year Award.[10] The team also included pitcher Pat Gillick,[8] who was later inducted in the Hall of Fame as an executive.[11] The Three–I League suspended operations after the 1961 season, hoping to resume in 1963.[12]

As a result, Fox Cities joined the Class D Midwest League (MWL) for 1962.[12] Despite a sub-.500 season, Cal Ripken Sr. won the 1962 Midwest League Manager of the Year Award.[13] The MWL was reclassified as a Class A league in 1963.[4] Manager Billy DeMars led the 1964 Foxes to win the second half title, qualifying them for a single championship game against the Clinton C-Sox.[14][15] The Foxes won the game, giving them their first Midwest League championship.[15] The affiliation with Baltimore ended after the 1965 season with the Foxes having a 401–352 record over the six-year period.[4]

Chicago White Sox (1966–1986)Edit

The Foxes joined the Chicago White Sox organization in 1966.[3] The partnership began with the club winning back-to-back Midwest League championships. Stan Wasiak managed the 1966 squad to the first half title and a 2–0 championship series win over the Cedar Rapids Cardinals.[16][17][18] In 1967, then known as the Appleton Foxes,[4] Manager of the Year Alex Cosmidis' team won the second half title before sweeping the Wisconsin Rapids Twins in two games to win the MWL crown again.[13][19][20] Two years later, Tom Saffell's Foxes won both halves of the 1969 season and were named league champions without any playoffs being held.[21] Saffell was selected for the league's Manager of the Year Award.[13]

Appleton won three Northern Division titles from 1971 to 1974, but they lost the league title each time in the final round. Joe Sparks was recognized as the MWL Manager of the Year for 1971.[13] Future Hall of Fame pitcher Goose Gossage played with Appleton from 1970 to 1971 and in 1974.[22] Fellow Hall of Famer Harold Baines began his career with the Foxes in 1977.[23] The 1978 team, under the management of Gordon Lund,[24] set a franchise record with their 97–40 season.[4] Having won the first half, they went on to capture the Northern Division title versus the Waterloo Indians, 2–0, before beating the Burlington Bees, 2–1, to win their fifth MWL championship.[25] Lund won the season's Manager of the Year Award,[13] and the team was recognized as one of the 100 greatest minor league teams of all-time by baseball historians in 2001.[26]

From 1982 to 1984, the Foxes won three consecutive Midwest League championships. Clinching a wild card berth in 1982, Appleton won the semifinals against the Springfield Cardinals, 2–0, then claimed the league title over the Madison Muskies, 2–1,[27] under manager Adrian Garrett.[28] The 1983 Northern Division champions, then led by John Boles,[29] won the semifinals versus Waterloo, 2–1,[30] then won a second consecutive championship against Springfield, 3–1.[31] Sal Rende's 1984 Foxes completed the back-to-back-to-back feat by winning the division, defeating Madison, 2–1, in the semifinals, and again taking the championship from Springfield in a full five-game series.[32][33] The 1986 Foxes won another division title, but were kept from winning a fourth consecutive championship with elimination in the semifinals.[34]

The White Sox affiliation ended after the 1986 season. Spanning 21 years, this was the longest affiliation in the minor league team's history.[3] It was also the most successful in terms of their win–loss record with the team going 1,471–1,261 over that stretch.[4]

Kansas City Royals (1987–1992)Edit

Appleton affiliated with the Kansas City Royals in 1987.[3] Aside from a 71–69 finish in 1987 and a 70–62 record with a first half title in 1992, the Foxes finished under .500 in four out of six years with the Royals.[4] Pitcher Tom Gordon led the Midwest League with 172 strikeouts in 1988 and was named the league's Prospect of the Year.[35] Tom Poquette, manager of the 1992 team, won the Manager of the Year Award.[13] Appleton accumulated a 386–433 record during the affiliation.[4]

Seattle Mariners (1993–2008)Edit

 
Fox Cities Stadium, home of the Timber Rattlers since 1995

Appleton became the Class A affiliate of the Seattle Mariners in 1993.[3] On August 29, 1994, the Foxes played their final game at the 54-year-old Goodland Field.[36] The 8–1 loss to the South Bend Silver Hawks was attended by a season-high 3,492 people.[36] The team would move to the new $4.75-million Fox Cities Stadium in Grand Chute the next season.[37] Also in 1995, after 37 seasons as the Foxes, the team rebranded as the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers. This change was made to increase their regional appeal outside the Fox Cities and to boost merchandise sales.[38] "Timber Rattlers" was chosen by area school children who selected it from among three possible monikers along with several logos for each.[37] The name refers to the timber rattlesnake, which is not typically found in the Appleton area but is more common in southwest Wisconsin.[38][39] The team's scheduled April 5, 1995, home opener at their new facility was postponed due to snow and rescheduled for the next afternoon as a doubleheader.[40] The Timber Rattlers won both games, defeating the West Michigan Whitecaps, 3–1 and 8–6, before an audience of 1,937 people.[41]

In 1994, shortstop Alex Rodriguez was selected as the league's Prospect of the Year after hitting for a .319 batting average with 14 home runs and 55 RBI in just 65 games.[42] Wisconsin failed to reach the postseason in their first three seasons with Seattle. As first-half winners in 1996, they won the Central Division title versus the Peoria Chiefs, 2–1, and then beat the Quad Cities River Bandits, 2–1, to advance to the championship round, but they were defeated by West Michigan, 3–1.[43] The 1997 and 1998 teams repeated as first half champions, but were each eliminated in the divisional rounds. In 1999, the Timber Rattlers qualified for the postseason with a second half title, won the Central Division over the Rockford Reds, 2–0, advanced through the semifinals over the Lansing Lugnuts, 2–0, but again lost the championship to Burlington, 3–2.[44] The team won second half titles and the quarterfinals in the next two seasons but were unable to win in the divisional rounds, and the 2003 first-half winners did not make it past the quarterfinals. In 2005, Wisconsin won both halves, the quarterfinals over the Beloit Snappers, 2–1, and the Western Division title against the Clinton LumberKings, 2–0, but failed to win the league championship as they were defeated by South Bend, 3–2.[45]

The Mariners affiliation ended after the 2008 season without any further postseason appearances. Over the 16-year relationship, Wisconsin had a 1,077–1,124 record.[4]

Milwaukee Brewers (2009–present)Edit

The Timber Rattlers affiliated with the Milwaukee Brewers in 2009. Managed by Matt Erickson,[46] Wisconsin qualified for the postseason in 2012 after a six-year absence from the playoffs. Having won the first half,[47] they won the quarterfinals over Burlington, 2–1, and the Western Division title versus Clinton, 2–0.[48] They ended the postseason by winning their ninth Midwest League championship over Fort Wayne, 3–1.[48] That same season, the franchise won the Larry MacPhail Award for outstanding minor league promotions.[49] Their most recent postseason appearances came in 2014 and 2016 via second half titles, but the Timber Rattlers were eliminated in each quarterfinal round.

Following the 2020 season, Appleton Baseball Club, Inc, sold the team to Third Base Ventures, LLC, a group consisting of principal owner Craig Dickman and minority owners team president Rob Zerjav and Brad Raaths.[1] The group also purchased the team's ballpark from the Fox Cities Amateur Sports Authority with plans to keep the team in Grand Chute.[50] Major League Baseball assumed control of Minor League Baseball before the 2021 season in a move to increase player salaries, modernize facility standards, and reduce travel. As a result, the Midwest League disbanded and the Timber Rattlers were elevated to the High-A classification and placed in the High-A Central.[51] Wisconsin began competition in the new league on May 4 with a 2–1 victory over the Beloit Snappers at Fox Cities Stadium.[52]

Season-by-season recordsEdit

Table key
League The team's final position in the league standings
Division The team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
  League champions (1958–present)
* Division champions (1971–present)
^ Postseason berth (1958–present)
Season-by-season records
Season League Regular season Postseason MLB affiliate Ref.
Record Win % League Division GB Record Win % Result
1958 IIIL 56–73 .434 6th 20+12 Washington Senators [53]
1959 IIIL 59–67 .468 4th 19 Washington Senators [54]
1960
 
IIIL 82–56 .594 1st Won IIIL championship Baltimore Orioles [9]
1961 IIIL 67–62 .519 4th 12 Baltimore Orioles [55]
1962 MWL 61–63 .492 7th 12+12 Baltimore Orioles [56]
1963 MWL 55–65 .458 8th 26 Baltimore Orioles [57]
1964
^  
MWL 81–43 .653 1st 1–0 1.000 Won second half title
Won MWL championship vs. Clinton C-Sox, 1–0[15]
Baltimore Orioles [58]
1965 MWL 55–63 .466 7th 25 Baltimore Orioles [59]
1966
^  
MWL 77–47 .621 2nd 5+12 2–0 1.000 Won first half title[17]
Won MWL championship vs. Cedar Rapids Cardinals, 2–0[18]
Chicago White Sox [60]
1967
^  
MWL 71–46 .607 1st 2–0 1.000 Won second half title[19]
Won MWL championship vs. Wisconsin Rapids Twins, 2–0[20]
Chicago White Sox [61]
1968 MWL 57–61 .483 6th 12+12 Chicago White Sox [62]
1969
 
MWL 84–41 .672 1st Won first and second half titles
Won MWL championship[21]
Chicago White Sox [63]
1970 MWL 64–60 .516 5th 9+12 Chicago White Sox [64]
1971
^ *
MWL 79–44 .642 1st 1st 1–2 .333 Won First and Second Half Northern Division titles
Won Northern Division title
Lost MWL championship vs. Quad Cities Angels, 2–1[65]
Chicago White Sox [66]
1972
^ *
MWL 76–51 .598 1st 1st 1–2 .333 Won Second Half Northern Division title
Won Northern Division title vs. Wisconsin Rapids Twins, 1–0
Lost MWL championship vs. Danville Warriors, 2–0[67]
Chicago White Sox [68]
1973 MWL 44–76 .367 10th 5th 27 Chicago White Sox [69]
1974
^ *
MWL 73–50 .593 2nd 2nd 4+12 3–2 .600 Won Second Half Northern Division title
Won Northern Division title vs. Wisconsin Rapids Twins, 2–0
Lost MWL championship vs. Danville Warriors, 2–1[70]
Chicago White Sox [71]
1975 MWL 50–77 .394 9th 5th 42+12 Chicago White Sox [72]
1976 MWL 56–74 .431 10th 5th 22 Chicago White Sox [73]
1977 MWL 54–84 .391 8th 4th 26 Chicago White Sox [74]
1978
^ *  
MWL 97–40 .708 1st 1st 4–1 .800 Won First Half Northern Division title
Won Northern Division title vs. Waterloo Indians, 2–0
Won MWL championship vs. Burlington Bees, 2–1[25]
Chicago White Sox [75]
1979 MWL 63–72 .467 5th 3rd 18 Chicago White Sox [76]
1980 MWL 76–63 .547 2nd 2nd 9 Chicago White Sox [77]
1981 MWL 54–80 .403 6th 4th 31 Chicago White Sox [78]
1982
^ *  
MWL 81–59 .579 3rd 2nd 6+12 4–1 .800 Won wild card berth
Won semifinals vs. Springfield Cardinals, 2–0
Won MWL championship vs. Madison Muskies, 2–1[27]
Chicago White Sox [79]
1983
*  
MWL 87–50 .635 1st 1st 5–2 .714 Won Northern Division title
Won semifinals vs. Waterloo Indians, 2–1[30]
Won MWL championship vs. Springfield Cardinals, 3–1[31]
Chicago White Sox [80]
1984
*  
MWL 87–49 .640 1st 1st 5–3 .625 Won Northern Division title
Won semifinals vs. Madison Muskies, 2–1
Won MWL championship vs. Springfield Cardinals, 3–2[33]
Chicago White Sox [81]
1985
*
MWL 85–54 .612 1st 1st 1–2 .333 Won Northern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Kenosha Twins, 2–1[34]
Chicago White Sox [82]
1986 MWL 56–83 .403 11th 3rd 29+12 Chicago White Sox [83]
1987 MWL 71–69 .507 6th (tie) 2nd 11 Kansas City Royals [84]
1988 MWL 58–82 .414 13th 6th 26 Kansas City Royals [85]
1989 MWL 67–68 .496 7th 3rd 19+12 Kansas City Royals [86]
1990 MWL 62–71 .466 8th 4th 14+12 Kansas City Royals [87]
1991 MWL 58–81 .417 14th 7th 19+12 Kansas City Royals [88]
1992
^
MWL 70–62 .530 10th 3rd 5+12 1–2 .333 Won First Half Northern Division title
Lost Northern Division title vs. Beloit Brewers, 2–1[89]
Kansas City Royals [90]
1993 MWL 62–73 .459 9th 6th 17+12 Seattle Mariners [91]
1994 MWL 75–64 .540 4th 3rd 14 Seattle Mariners [92]
1995 MWL 63–75 .457 12th 4th 24+12 Seattle Mariners [93]
1996
^ *
MWL 77–58 .570 2nd 2nd 1+12 5–5 .500 Won First Half Central Division title
Won Central Division title vs. Peoria Chiefs, 2–1
Won semifinals vs. Quad Cities River Bandits, 2–1
Lost MWL championship vs. West Michigan Whitecaps, 3–1[43]
Seattle Mariners [94]
1997
^
MWL 76–63 .547 2nd 1st 0–2 .000 Won First Half Central Division title
Lost Central Division title vs. Kane County Cougars, 2–0[95]
Seattle Mariners [96]
1998
^
MWL 72–65 .526 5th 1st 1–2 .333 Won First Half Central Division title
Lost Central Division title vs. Rockford Cubbies, 2–1[97]
Seattle Mariners [98]
1999
^ *
MWL 72–66 .522 5th 3rd 6+12 6–3 .667 Won Second Half Central Division title
Won Central Division title vs. Rockford Reds, 2–0
Won semifinals vs. Lansing Lugnuts, 2–0
Lost MWL championship vs. Burlington Bees, 3–2[44]
Seattle Mariners [99]
2000
^
MWL 78–60 .565 3rd 1st 3–3 .500 Won Second Half Western Division title
Won quarterfinals vs. Kane County Cougars, 2–1
Lost Western Division title vs. Beloit Snappers, 2–1[100]
Seattle Mariners [101]
2001
^
MWL 84–52 .618 2nd 2nd 3 2–2 .500 Won Second Half Western Division title
Won quarterfinals vs. Quad Cities River Bandits, 2–0
Lost Western Division title vs. Kane County Cougars, 2–0[102]
Seattle Mariners [103]
2002 MWL 53–86 .381 13th 8th 32+12 Seattle Mariners [104]
2003
^
MWL 69–66 .511 6th (tie) 3rd (tie) 9 0–2 .000 Won First Half Western Division wild card berth[105]
Lost quarterfinals vs. Beloit Snappers, 2–0[106]
Seattle Mariners [107]
2004 MWL 57–82 .410 12th 7th 26 Seattle Mariners [108]
2005
^ *
MWL 76–63 .547 2nd 1st 6–4 .600 Won First and Second Half Western Division title
Won quarterfinals vs. Beloit Snappers, 2–1
Won Western Division title vs. Clinton LumberKings, 2–0
Lost MWL championship vs. South Bend Silver Hawks, 3–2[45]
Seattle Mariners [109]
2006 MWL 54–86 .386 13th 7th 25+12 Seattle Mariners [110]
2007 MWL 53–85 .384 14th 8th 25 Seattle Mariners [111]
2008 MWL 56–80 .412 13th 8th 21+12 Seattle Mariners [112]
2009 MWL 58–81 .417 12th 7th 23+12 Milwaukee Brewers [113]
2010 MWL 58–80 .420 14th 7th 25 Milwaukee Brewers [114]
2011 MWL 67–72 .482 10th (tie) 4th 15 Milwaukee Brewers [115]
2012
^ *  
MWL 78–61 .561 3rd 1st 7–2 .778 Won First Half Western Division title[47]
Won quarterfinals vs. Burlington Bees, 2–1
Won Western Division title vs. Clinton LumberKings, 2–0
Won MWL championship vs. Fort Wayne TinCaps, 3–1
Milwaukee Brewers [48]
2013 MWL 59–76 .437 13th 6th 27+12 Milwaukee Brewers [116]
2014
^
MWL 72–67 .518 5th (tie) 3rd (tie) 18+12 0–2 .000 Won Second Half Western Division wild card berth[117]
Lost quarterfinals vs. Kane County Cougars, 2–0[118]
Milwaukee Brewers [119]
2015 MWL 50–89 .360 15th 7th 38+12 Milwaukee Brewers [120]
2016
^
MWL 71–69 .507 8th 4th 15 0–2 .000 Won Second Half Western Division wild card berth[121]
Lost quarterfinals vs. Cedar Rapids Kernels, 2–0[122]
Milwaukee Brewers [123]
2017 MWL 59–79 .428 15th 8th 20 Milwaukee Brewers [124]
2018 MWL 68–71 .489 10th 7th 12+12 Milwaukee Brewers [125]
2019 MWL 69–70 .496 9th 5th 12 Milwaukee Brewers [126]
2020 MWL Season cancelled (COVID-19 pandemic)[127] Milwaukee Brewers [128]
Totals 4,159–4,125 .502 60–46 .566
Franchise totals by affiliation
Affiliation Regular season Postseason Composite
Record Win % Apps. Record Win % Record Win %
Washington Senators (1958–1959) 115–140 .451 0 115–140 .451
Baltimore Orioles (1960–1965) 401–352 .533 1 1–0 1.000 402–352 .533
Chicago White Sox (1966–1986) 1,471–1,261 .538 11 28–15 .651 1,499–1,276 .540
Kansas City Royals (1987–1992) 386–433 .471 1 1–2 .333 387–435 .471
Seattle Mariners (1993–2008) 1,077–1,124 .489 8 23–23 .500 1,100–1,147 .490
Milwaukee Brewers (2009–present) 709–815 .465 3 7–6 .538 716–821 .466
All-time 4,159–4,125 .502 24 60–46 .566 4,219–4,171 .503

Radio and televisionEdit

All home and road games are broadcast on WNAM 1280 AM.[129] Live audio broadcasts are also available online through the team's website and the MiLB First Pitch app.[129] All home games and select road games can be viewed through the MiLB.TV subscription feature of the official website of Minor League Baseball, with audio provided by a radio simulcast.[130] Select home games are televised on WCWF CW 14 in Green Bay/Appleton, and on WVTV-DT2 My 24 in Milwaukee.[129]

MascotsEdit

 
Fang, the team mascot

Wisconsin's mascot is an anthropomorphic timber rattler snake named Fang. He is golden yellow with a red tongue extending from his mouth and wears the same uniform as the team.[131] Prior to Fang and the 1995 rebrand, Appleton's mascot was Freddy Fox, an anthropomorphic fox who wore the team's jersey and cap.[132] Circa 1980, the mascot was Homer Run, who was human in appearance and wore the same style uniform as the Foxes.[133]

RosterEdit

Wisconsin Timber Rattlers roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 20 Freisis Adames
  • 21 Victor Castañeda
  • 25 Harold Chirino
  • 24 Taylor Floyd
  • -- Tyler Gillies  
  • 15 Justin Jarvis  
  • 26 John LaRossa
  • 39 Joey Matulovich
  • 28 Zach Mort
  • 37 Evan Reifert
  • 14 Arman Sabouri
  • 30 Brady Schanuel
  • 31 Cristían Sierra
  • 12 Nash Walters

Catchers

  • 17 Thomas Dillard
  • 16 Nick Kahle
  • 10 Kekai Rios

Infielders

  •  2 Hayden Cantrelle
  •  9 Yeison Coca
  •  1 David Hamilton
  • 22 Chad McClanahan
  • 36 Antonio Pinero

Outfielders

  • 27 LG Castillo
  •  6 Joe Gray Jr.
  • 11 Korry Howell
  • 18 Jesus Lujano
  •  3 Carlos Rodriguez
  •  4 Je'Von Ward


Manager

Coaches

  • 19 Hiram Burgos (pitching)
  • 34 Michael O'Neal (development)
  •  7 Nick Stanley (hitting)

60-day injured list

  • 85 Max Lazar
  • -- Alejandro Marte
  • -- Bryce Milligan
  • -- Alexis Ramirez
  • 23 Scott Sunitsch

  7-day injured list
* On Milwaukee Brewers 40-man roster
~ Development list
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
± Taxi squad
† Temporarily inactive list
Roster updated July 31, 2021
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • High-A Central
Milwaukee Brewers minor league players

AchievementsEdit

AwardsEdit

Four players and six managers have won league awards in recognition for their performance with the Foxes/Timber Rattlers.

Three–I League Awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Most Valuable Player Pete Ward 1960 [10]
Rookie of the Year Boog Powell 1960 [10]
 
Alex Rodriguez won the 1994 MWL Prospect of the Year Award.
Midwest League Awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Prospect of the Year Tom Gordon 1988 [13]
Prospect of the Year Alex Rodriguez 1994 [13]
Manager of the Year Cal Ripken Sr. 1962 [13]
Manager of the Year Alex Cosmidis 1967 [13]
Manager of the Year Tom Saffell 1969 [13]
Manager of the Year Joe Sparks 1971 [13]
Manager of the Year Gordon Lund 1978 [13]
Manager of the Year Tom Poquette 1992 [13]

No-hittersEdit

The Timber Rattlers have pitched 14 no-hitters in their franchise history. A no-hit game occurs when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits over the course of a game.[134] A perfect game, a much rarer feat, occurs when no batters reach base by a hit or any other means, such as a walk, hit by pitch, or error.[134] Wisconsin's no-hitters were accomplished by a total of 19 pitchers. Nine were complete games pitched by a lone pitcher, and five were combined no-hitters.

Table key
Score Game score with Wisconsin runs listed first
(#) Number of innings in a game that was shorter or longer than 9 innings
£ Pitcher was left-handed
No-hitters
No. Date Pitcher(s) Score Opponent Location Catcher(s) Ref.
1 July 17, 1962 Alan Riffle£ 7–0 (5) Decatur Commodores Goodland Field William Shirah [135]
2 July 22, 1965 Emmanuel Fitzgerald 4–0 (7) Quincy Cubs Q Stadium Jim Rouse [136]
3 May 28, 1966 Mickey Abarbanel£ 9–1 Wisconsin Rapids Twins Goodland Field Robert Von Eps [137]
4 June 15, 1972 Robert McCauley 2–0 (7) Quincy Cubs Goodland Field Michael Reynolds [138]
5 August 22, 1975 Larry Monroe 1–0 (7) Cedar Rapids Giants Goodland Field Harris Price [139]
6 May 26, 1986 John Stein 5–0 Beloit Brewers Goodland Field Eric Milholland [140]
7 July 26, 1990 John Conner (7 IP)
Jim Smith (2 IP)
8–0 Wausau Timbers Goodland Field Colin Ryan [141]
8 June 28, 1994 Brett Hinchliffe 13–0 Cedar Rapids Kernels Veterans Memorial Stadium Jose Cuellar [142]
9 April 29, 2000 J. J. Putz 6–1 (7) Kane County Cougars Philip B. Elfstrom Stadium Juan Alcala [143]
10 August 27, 2001 Derrick Van Dusen£ 2–0 Cedar Rapids Kernels Veterans Memorial Stadium Ben Hudson [144]
11 August 24, 2010 Jake Odorizzi (8 IP)
Adrian Rosario (1 IP)
3–0 Cedar Rapids Kernels Veterans Memorial Stadium Cameron Garfield [145]
12 May 4, 2012 Chad Thompson (5 IP)
Mark Williams (4 IP)
5–0 Clinton LumberKings Ashford University Field Rafael Neda [146]
13 May 29, 2021 Freisis Adames (5 IP)
Taylor Floyd (2 IP)
8–1 (7) Cedar Rapids Kernels Veterans Memorial Stadium Kekai Rios (4 Inn.)
Nick Kahle (3 Inn.)
[147]
14 June 10, 2021 Justin Bullock (5 IP)
Carlos Luna (4 IP)
6–1 South Bend Cubs Four Winds Field Nick Kahle [148]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Mehring, Chris. "Third Base Ventures Purchases Appleton Baseball Club, Inc". Wisconsin Timber Rattlers. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Front Office Staff". Wisconsin Timber Rattlers. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved December 5, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Appleton Baseball History". Wisconsin Timber Rattlers. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved December 5, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Appleton, Wisconsin Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 7, 2020.
  5. ^ "Goodland Field". Stats Crew. Retrieved December 7, 2020.
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