Winiata railway station

Winiata railway station was a station on the North Island Main Trunk in New Zealand.[1][2] It was decorated with an archway when the 13+12 mi (21.7 km) Mangaweka to Taihape section was opened by the Prime Minister, Richard Seddon, on 21 November 1904.[3]

Winiata railway station
Winiata railway station about 1910.jpg
Winiata railway station about 1910
General information
LocationNew Zealand
Coordinates39°41′28″S 175°48′43″E / 39.691062°S 175.811934°E / -39.691062; 175.811934Coordinates: 39°41′28″S 175°48′43″E / 39.691062°S 175.811934°E / -39.691062; 175.811934
Elevation415 m (1,362 ft)
Line(s)North Island Main Trunk
DistanceWellington 249.03 km (154.74 mi)
History
Opened21 November 1904
ClosedPassengers 10 August 1959
Goods 12 March 1972
ElectrifiedJune 1988
Previous namesBosher's Siding name change approved 17 December 1906
Services
Preceding station   Historical railways   Following station
Taihape
Line open, station closed
2.82 km (1.75 mi)
  North Island Main Trunk
KiwiRail
  Ohotu
Line open, station closed
1.94 km (1.21 mi)
Opening of the railway at Bosher's siding natural arch, 10 September 1904

Only a single track remains through the station site and there is little sign that there was ever a station there.[4]

HistoryEdit

On 25 January 1904 the sawmillers, Bosher Bros, applied for siding,[5] which cost them about £400.[6] On 17 August 1905 an application was made for passenger trains to stop there and a platform and shelter for passengers were ready by November 1906. H D Bennett took over Bosher's private siding in 1913 and it became a public siding in 1915, when Taihape freezing works was built.[7] They opened a siding on the other side of the line.[5] That works closed in 1925.[8] The platform was raised in 1936. Sheep loading yards were built in 1937 and extended in 1941.[5]

Like the other stations along this part of NIMT, Winiata had freight from several other timber mills, including Bright & Carter,[9] Manawatu Timber Co,[5] Sowersby and Symes.[6] By 1959 only lime, manure and sheep were being carried and the sidings stored stock wagons during the slack season. On 10 August 1959 the station closed to passengers, parcels, and goods in small lots. In 1969 the sheep yards and west siding closed. By 1972 Taihape Bulk Fertilisers had stopped using the station, which was closed on 12 March 1972, after which the sheep yards and station building were dismantled.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ New Zealand Railway and Tramway Atlas (First ed.). Quail Map Co. 1965. pp. 3 & 4.
  2. ^ Pierre, Bill (1981). North Island Main Trunk. Wellington: A.H&A.W Reed. pp. 289–290. ISBN 0589013165.
  3. ^ "GALA DAY AT TAIHAPE. MANAWATU TIMES". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 21 November 1904. Retrieved 7 January 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "8182 State Hwy 1". Google Maps. Retrieved 7 January 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ a b c d e "Stations" (PDF). NZR Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 10 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ a b "COMMERCIAL. WANGANUI HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 26 March 1907. Retrieved 7 January 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. ^ "TAIHAPE FREEZING WORKS. TAIHAPE DAILY TIMES". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 14 September 1915. Retrieved 7 January 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ "TAIHAPE MEAT WORKS. NEW ZEALAND HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 5 September 1925. Retrieved 7 January 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ "TRADE WITH THE FAR EAST. TARANAKI HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 26 May 1906. Retrieved 7 January 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

External linksEdit