William R. Walker & Son

William R. Walker & Son was an American architectural firm in Providence, Rhode Island, active during the years 1881 to 1936. It included partners William Russell Walker (1830–1905), William Howard Walker (1856–1922) and later William Russell Walker II (1884–1936).

William R. Walker & Son
Practice information
PartnersWilliam R. Walker; W. Howard Walker; William R. Walker II
FoundersWilliam R. Walker
Founded1881
Dissolved1936
LocationProvidence, Rhode Island
The Cranston Street Armory in Providence, Rhode Island, designed by William R. Walker & Son in 1897 in a Medieval style and completed ten years later.

Firm historyEdit

William R. Walker began his architectural practice in 1864. Between 1876 and 1881 he partnered with Thomas J. Gould in Walker & Gould. In 1881, the two parted ways to start independent firms.[1] Walker took his son W. Howard Walker into partnership to form the firm of William R. Walker & Son. William R. Walker died in 1905. W. Howard Walker died in 1922, at which point his son William R. Walker II took charge until his own death in 1936.[1]

After the death of the last Walker, the firm was briefly succeeded by Rice & Arnold, the partnership of George H. Rice (1881-1945) and Roy F. Arnold (1884-1972), both draftsmen in the Walker office. Arnold continued to practice architecture in Providence and Pawtucket into the 1950s.[2]

Throughout the firm's history, it was known for its educational buildings. All of the Walkers had important political connections, enabling them to obtain the commissions for these and other civic structures. The part of the Walker legacy that is most commonly passed over is their residential and commercial commissions. Prominent commercial commissions include Providence's Lederer Building (1897), Attleboro's Bronson Building (1903), and the Washington Building (1921) in Providence.

Partner biographiesEdit

William Russell Walker
Born(1830-04-14)April 14, 1830
DiedMarch 11, 1905(1905-03-11) (aged 74)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationArchitect
William Howard Walker
Born(1856-01-19)January 19, 1856
DiedOctober 19, 1922(1922-10-19) (aged 66)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationArchitect
William Russell Walker II
Born(1884-01-28)January 28, 1884
DiedSeptember 26, 1936(1936-09-26) (aged 52)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationArchitect

William Russell WalkerEdit

William R. Walker was born April 14, 1830, in Seekonk, Massachusetts. He established his architecture practice in 1864, and in 1876 formed the firm of Walker & Gould with Thomas J. Gould. In 1881 Walker formed a partnership with his son, W. Howard Walker, who remained his partner for the rest of his career.

Walker died March 11, 1905, in Pawtucket.

William Howard WalkerEdit

W. Howard Walker was born January 19, 1856, in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. He attended the public schools and joined his father's office as a draftsman in 1874, becoming his partner in 1881. After his father's death in 1905, he was sole proprietor in the firm until the return of his son from Europe. Like his father, he was an officer in the Rhode Island militia.[3][4] He joined the American Institute of Architects in 1921.[5]

In 1881 he was married to Hattie B. Hewell of Providence.[4] He died October 19, 1922, in Seekonk, Massachusetts.

William Russell Walker IIEdit

William R. Walker II was born January 28, 1884, in Pawtucket. He attended the Pawtucket schools and Brown University before transferring to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which he graduated in 1910. He then studied for a year abroad, travelling in Paris and Rome. In 1911 he returned to Providence, joining his father's firm.[4] Upon his father's death in 1922, he became head of the firm. Like his father and grandfather, he continued the firm's focus on institutional work. In 1932 he was chosen by United States Commissioner of Education William John Cooper to be an advisory architect for school construction.[6] He joined the American Institute of Architects alongside his father in 1921.[7] Unlike his father and grandfather, he apparently had no affiliation with the state militia.

In 1914 he was married to Jessie Philpott of Providence, and they had three daughters. He died September 26, 1936, in Providence.[8][6]

Architectural worksEdit

In Providence, Rhode IslandEdit

  • 1881 - John E. Troup House, 477 Broadway, Providence, Rhode Island[9]
  • 1882 - Elmwood Grammar School (former), 15 Vineyard St, Providence, Rhode Island[10]
  • 1882 - George E. Boyden House, 20 Bainbridge Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[11]
  • 1883 - Frank M. Mathewson House, 224 Bowen St, Providence, Rhode Island[12]
  • 1883 - St. Theresa's R. C. Church, 265 Manton Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[13][10]
    • Demolished.
  •  
    Masonic Temple, 1884
    1884 - Masonic Temple, 127 Dorrance St, Providence, Rhode Island[14]
  • 1885 - Benjamin F. Vaughan House, 148 Power St, Providence, Rhode Island[15][16]
    • Demolished.
  • 1885 - John McAuslan House, 544 Elmwood Ave., Providence, Rhode Island[17][18]
    • One of Providence's most fanciful dwellings. Demolished.
  • 1885 - Smith Street Primary School, 400 Smith St, Providence, Rhode Island[9]
  • 1886 - Atwells Avenue Fire Station, 318 Atwells Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[15][19]
    • Demolished.
  • 1886 - Covell Street Primary School, 231 Amherst St, Providence, Rhode Island[20]
  • 1887 - Christ Episcopal Church, 909 Eddy St, Providence, Rhode Island[21]
    • Demolished in 2006.[22]
  • 1888 - Manton Avenue Grammar School, 917 Manton Ave, Manton, Rhode Island[9]
    • Demolished in 2002.
  • 1889 - Boston Store Annex, 140 Union St, Providence, Rhode Island[23]
  • 1889 - Nicholas and Cyrus M. van Slyck Duplex, 4–6 Young Orchard Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[17]
    • Purchased by Bryant, and variously known as Gardner and Allan Halls. Demolished.
  • 1892 - Boston Store (Remodeling), 239 Westminster St, Providence, Rhode Island[24]
    • New facade and the addition of two stories.
  • 1893 - James E. Sullivan House, 254 Wayland Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[9]
  • 1895 - St. Joseph's R. C. Hospital, 21 Peace St, Providence, Rhode Island[9]
    • Demolished.
  • 1896 - Lederer Building, 137 Mathewson St, Providence, Rhode Island[25]
  • 1897 - Hotel Savoy, 135 Snow St, Providence, Rhode Island[26][27][28]
    • Demolished in 1994.
  • 1900 - Estelle R. Jackson Duplex, 121-123 Benevolent St, Providence, Rhode Island[9]
  • 1900 - George W. Robertson House, 242 Adelaide Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[9]
  • 1903 - Caesar Misch Building, 400 Westminster St, Providence, Rhode Island[29]
  • 1903 - Cranston Street Armory, 125 Dexter St, Providence, Rhode Island[30]
  • 1911 - Hanley Building, 56 Pine St, Providence, Rhode Island[31]
  • 1913 - Armory of Mounted Commands, 1051 N Main St, Providence, Rhode Island[32]
  • 1914 - Emery Theatre, 79 Mathewson St, Providence, Rhode Island[33]
    • Later the Carlton. Demolished in 1954.
  • 1914 - Gaiety Theatre, 220 Weybosset St, Providence, Rhode Island[34]
    • Demolished.
  • 1915 - Everett Apartments, 111 Everett Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[9]
  • 1915 - Avon Cinema, 260 Thayer St, Providence, Rhode Island[35]
  • 1916 - Emery's Majestic Theatre, 201 Washington St, Providence, Rhode Island[36]
  • 1916 - Esek Hopkins School, 480 Charles St, Providence, Rhode Island[37]
  • 1916 - Lederer Mausoleum, Congregation Sons of Israel and David Cemetery, 401 Reservoir Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[38]
    • A Doric temple built of Westerly granite.
  • 1916 - Modern Theatre, 440 Westminster St, Providence, Rhode Island[39][40]
    • Demolished in 1966.
  • 1916 - Hotel Dreyfus (Remodeling), 95 Mathewson St, Providence, Rhode Island[41][42]
  • 1916 - Medical Building, 234 Thayer St, Providence, Rhode Island[43]
  • 1917 - Vinton Building, 354 Westminster St, Providence, Rhode Island[44]
    • Demolished.
  • 1919 - Rialto Theatre (Remodeling), 121 Mathewson St, Providence, Rhode Island[45]
    • Added the Mathewson facade. The auditorium was demolished in 1936.
  • 1919 - Watkins Building, 274 Pine St, Providence, Rhode Island[46]
    • Built for the D. W. Watkins Company.
  • 1921 - Hotel Berkshire Annex, 133 Mathewson St, Providence, Rhode Island[47]
    • Now part of the Hotel Providence.
  • 1921 - Washington Building, 93 Washington St, Providence, Rhode Island[48]
    • Demolished.
  • 1923 - Jewish Orphanage of Rhode Island, 164 Summit Ave, Providence, Rhode Island[49]
  • 1924 - Rhode Island College of Pharmacy and Allied Sciences, 235 Benefit St, Providence, Rhode Island[19]
    • Now a RISD building.
  • 1926 - Henry Barnard School, Rhode Island College of Education, 199 Promenade St, Providence, Rhode Island[9]
  • 1934 - Gymnasium and Training School, 86 Mount Hope Ave, Rhode Island School for the Deaf, Providence, Rhode Island[50]

Elsewhere in Providence County, Rhode IslandEdit

  • 1881 - Ernest W. Tinkham House, 194 East Ave, Harrisville, Rhode Island[51]
  • 1882 - John F. Clarke House, 91 Broad St, Valley Falls, Rhode Island[52]
  • 1883 - Corliss Safe Manufacturing Works, 72 Fenner St, Cranston, Rhode Island[53]
    • Altered.
  • 1884 - First Freewill Baptist Church, 130 Broadway, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[54]
  • 1884 - Park Place Congregational Church, 12 Park Pl, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[55]
    • Burned in 1934.
  • 1885 - Mauran Avenue School, 186 Mauran Ave, East Providence, Rhode Island[56]
    • Demolished.
  • 1885 - Middle Street School, 260 Middle St, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[57]
    • Demolished.
  • 1886 - 1st Ward Wardroom, 171 Fountain St, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[58]
  • 1886 - 5th Ward Wardroom, 47 Mulberry St, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[58]
  • 1888 - East Providence Town Hall, 145 Taunton Ave, East Providence, Rhode Island[59]
    • Burned in 1976.
  • 1888 - United Congregational Church, 75 N Broadway, East Providence, Rhode Island[60]
    • Altered in 1931 by Benjamin W. Wright.
  • 1888 - Williams Avenue School, 115 Williams Ave, East Providence, Rhode Island[60]
    • Heavily altered.
  • 1889 - Church Hill Grammar School, 81 Park Pl, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[61]
  • 1889 - Edgewood School, 185 Norwood Ave, Cranston, Rhode Island[62]
    • Demolished.
  • 1889 - Lincoln High School (former), 580 Broad St, Central Falls, Rhode Island[17][63]
    • Built when Central Falls was a part of Lincoln. Now the City Hall.
  •  
    Grove Street School, Pawtucket, 1890.
    1890 - Grove Street School, 16-26 Grove St, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[61]
    • Demolished.
  • 1892 - Charles C. Newall House, 234 Norwood Ave, Cranston, Rhode Island[64]
  •  
    Town Hall, Valley Falls, 1894.
    1894 - Cumberland Town Hall, 45 Broad St, Valley Falls, Rhode Island[65]
  • 1894 - Pawtucket Armory, 172 Exchange St, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[66]
  • 1894 - Payne Building, 7 Goff Ave, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[67]
    • Demolished.
  • 1895 - Pawtucket High School (former), 300 Broadway, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[61]
  • 1896 - St. Charles Borromeo R. C. School, 62 Daniels St, Woonsocket, Rhode Island[68][69]
    • Demolished.
  • 1896 - Woonsocket District Courthouse, 24 Front St, Woonsocket, Rhode Island[50]
  • 1897 - Masonic Building, 55 High St, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[70]
    • Demolished.
  • 1900 - St. Joseph's R. C. Convent, 194 Walcott St, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[71]
    • Demolished.
  • 1901 - Social Street School, 706 Social St, Woonsocket, Rhode Island[72]
  • 1902 - Harrisville School, 201 Callahan School St, Harrisville, Rhode Island[73]
    • Demolished.
  • 1904 - Clark Street School, 20 Clark St, Valley Falls, Rhode Island[74]
    • Demolished.
  • 1904 - South Woodlawn School, 54 Warren Ave, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[74]
    • Demolished.
  • 1908 - Prospect Street School, 329 Prospect St, Pawtucket, Rhode Island[61]
    • Demolished.
  • 1913 - Woonsocket Armory, 350 S Main St, Woonsocket, Rhode Island[75]
  • 1914 - Central Falls Police Station and Courthouse (former), 507 Broad St, Central Falls, Rhode Island[32]
  • 1919 - Clubhouse, Metacomet Country Club, 500 Veterans Memorial Pkwy, East Providence, Rhode Island[76]
  • 1919 - Thornton School, 4 School St, Thornton, Rhode Island[77]
  • 1920 - Fire Station No. 3, 1384 Cranston St, Cranston, Rhode Island[78]
  • 1921 - North Smithfield Memorial Town Building, 1 Main St, Slatersville, Rhode Island[79]
    • Altered.
  • 1922 - Arthur E. Platt School, 80 Burnside Ave, Riverside, Rhode Island[80]
  • 1924 - Park Theatre, 848 Park Ave, Cranston, Rhode Island[81]
  • 1927 - Central Falls High School, 24 Summer St, Central Falls, Rhode Island[82][83]
  • 1927 - Cranston High School, 899 Park Ave, Cranston, Rhode Island[81]
  • 1927 - Fire Station No. 1, 131 Park Ave, Cranston, Rhode Island[84]
  • 1927 - Masonic Temple, 2121 Smith St, Centerdale, Rhode Island[85]
  • 1928 - Chester W. Barrows School, 9 Beachmont Ave, Cranston, Rhode Island[84][86]
  • 1929 - East Providence Junior High School (former), 20 Whelden Ave, East Providence, Rhode Island[60]
    • Now known as the Taunton Plaza apartments.
  • 1929 - Frank C. Angell Memorial Town Hall, 2000 Smith St, Centerdale, Rhode Island[87]
  • 1930 - Edward S. Rhodes School, 164 Shaw Ave, Cranston, Rhode Island[88]
  • 1935 - Building for Disturbed Men, 16 Wilma Schesler Ln, Rhode Island Hospital for Mental Diseases, Howard, Rhode Island[50][89]
  • 1935 - Building for Disturbed Women, 18 Wilma Schesler Ln, Rhode Island Hospital for Mental Diseases, Howard, Rhode Island[50][89]

In Kent County, Rhode IslandEdit

In Bristol County, Rhode IslandEdit

In Washington County, Rhode IslandEdit

In MassachusettsEdit

In ConnecticutEdit

In MaineEdit

Associated architectsEdit

Several architects were educated in the office of William R. Walker & Son, including:

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Jordy, William H. and Christopher P. Monkhouse. Buildings on Paper: Rhode Island Architectural Drawings 1825-1945. 1982.
  2. ^ Providence and Pawtucket directories
  3. ^ The Cotton Centennial, 1790-1890 (Providence: J. A. & R. A. Reid, 1891)
  4. ^ a b c "Walker" in New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial 4, ed. William Richard Cutter (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1915): 2274-2276.
  5. ^ William Howard Walker, AIA Historical Directory of American Architects.
  6. ^ a b "Walker, William Russell" in National Cyclopedia of American Biography 27 (New York: James T. White & Company, 1939): 451.
  7. ^ William Russell Walker, AIA Historical Directory of American Architects.
  8. ^ "Brunonians Far and Near" in Brown Alumni Monthly 37, no. 4 (November, 1936): 106.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i Woodward, Wm. McKenzie. Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources. 1986.
  10. ^ a b McGowan, Lewis and Daniel Brown. Images of America: Providence. 2006.
  11. ^ American Architect and Building News 4 Aug. 1883: 54.
  12. ^ Sanitary Engineer 2 Aug. 1883: 211.
  13. ^ Sanitary Engineer 30 Aug. 1883: 307.
  14. ^ "Freemasons' Hall, Providence". Freemasons' Repository Feb. 1886: 212-217.
  15. ^ a b c Greene, Welcome Arnold. The Providence Plantations for 250 Years. 1886.
  16. ^ PPS Records for 125 Hope Street
  17. ^ a b c d Greive, Robert and John P. Fernald. The Cotton Centennial, 1790–1890. 1891.
  18. ^ Gillon, Edmund V. Early Ellustrations and Views of American Architecture. 1971.
  19. ^ a b Cady, John Hutchins. The Civic and Architectural Development of Providence. 1957.
  20. ^ Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Buildings, for the Year Ending December 31, 1886. 1886.
  21. ^ Engineering and Building Record 8 Oct. 1887: 528. New York
  22. ^ South Providence, Providence: Statewide Historical Preservation Report P-P-2. 1978.
  23. ^ Engineering and Building Record 6 July 1889: 84.
  24. ^ Downtown Providence Historic District NRHP Nomination. 1984.
  25. ^ "Buildings". Engineering News and American Railway Journal. Vol. XXXVI, no. 14. 1 October 1896. p. 108. Retrieved 11 May 2022 – via Google Books. PROVIDENCE R. I.—S. B. Lederer, 100 Stewart St., who are to erect a 12 story office building on Mathewson St., have awarded the contract for the construction to M. J. Houlihan. Archs., Wm. R. Walker & Son, 17 Custom House.
  26. ^ Brickbuilder Oct 1897: 238.
  27. ^ American Architect and Building News 2 Oct. 1897: 2.
  28. ^ Providence City Documents for the Year 1898. 1898.
  29. ^ Engineering Record 24 Jan. 1903: 118.
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  32. ^ a b Annual Report of the State Auditor. 1915.
  33. ^ "Carlton Theatre in Providence, RI - Cinema Treasures".
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  35. ^ American Contractor 5 June 1915: 71.
  36. ^ "The New Majestic Theatre". Providence Magazine April 1916: 283.
  37. ^ American Contractor 30 Oct. 1916: 48.
  38. ^ American Contractor 1 Jan. 1916: 61.
  39. ^ Sheet Metal Worker 9 Feb. 1921: 26.
  40. ^ Providence Magazine Oct 1916: 663.
  41. ^ American Contractor 20 May 1916: 59.
  42. ^ American Contractor 3 June 1916: 36.
  43. ^ American Contractor 30 Dec. 1916: 39.
  44. ^ American Contractor 11 Aug. 1917: 41.
  45. ^ American Contractor 22 Feb. 1919: 60.
  46. ^ American Contractor 4 Oct. 1919: 62.
  47. ^ Domestic Engineering 27 Aug. 1921: 404.
  48. ^ Power 19 April 1921: 645.
  49. ^ Engineering News-Record 1923: 172.
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  52. ^ American Architect and Building News 3 May 1884: 210.
  53. ^ The Sanitary Engineer 2 Aug. 1883: 211.
  54. ^ Quality Hill Historic District NRHP Nomination. 1986.
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  61. ^ a b c d Church Hill Grammar School NRHP Nomination. 2010.
  62. ^ Annual Report of the Board of Education. 1891.
  63. ^ Central Falls, Rhode Island: Statewide Historical Preservation Report P-CF-1. 1978.
  64. ^ Norwood Avenue Historic District NRHP Nomination. 2002.
  65. ^ Historic and Architectural Resources of Cumberland, Rhode Island. 1998.
  66. ^ Engineering Record 7 April 1894: 308.
  67. ^ Electrical World 23 Feb. 1895: 233.
  68. ^ School Journal 2 Nov. 1895: 403.
  69. ^ St. Charles Borromeo Church Complex NRHP Nomination. 1983.
  70. ^ Brickbuilder Feb. 1897: 41.
  71. ^ Engineering News 10 May 1900: 153.
  72. ^ Engineering Record 19 Oct. 1901: 391.
  73. ^ Annual Report of the State Board of Education, January, 1903. 1903.
  74. ^ a b c d Annual Report of the State Board of Education, January, 1905. 1905.
  75. ^ a b Annual Report of the State Auditor. 1913.
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  77. ^ a b American Contractor 15 Nov. 1919: 49.
  78. ^ American Contractor 12 June 1920: 48.
  79. ^ Worcester Historical Museum. Landscape of Industry. 2009.
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  82. ^ Statewide Historical Preservation Report P-CF-1: Central Falls, Rhode Island. 1978.
  83. ^ a b American Contractor 4 May 1918: 63.
  84. ^ a b Edgewood Historic District – Taft Estate Plat NRHP Nomination. 2003.
  85. ^ Domestic Engineering 1927: 106.
  86. ^ Guide Officiel des Franco-Américains. 1940.
  87. ^ Historic and Architectural Resources of North Providence, Rhode Island. 1978.
  88. ^ Bridgemen's Magazine 1930: 614.
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  95. ^ American Contractor 24 April 1920: 61.
  96. ^ American Contractor 4 June 1921: 63.
  97. ^ Engineering News-Record 1924: 150.
  98. ^ Iron Age 1926: 667.
  99. ^ Bridgemen's Magazine 1931: 608.
  100. ^ Bridgemen's Magazine 1932: 162.
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  114. ^ Sanitary Engineer 16 July 1885: 136.
  115. ^ Electrical World 3 Nov. 1888: 247.
  116. ^ "Anthony, Byron W. House". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d. Web.
  117. ^ "Fall River National Bank Building". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d. Web.
  118. ^ "Bronson Building - Attleboro Masonic Hall". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d. Web.
  119. ^ "Massachusetts National Guard Armory". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d. Web.
  120. ^ "Goff Memorial Hall". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d. Web.
  121. ^ Bridgemen's Magazine May 1917: 261.
  122. ^ Report of the Chief of the Massachusetts District Police for 1918. 1919.
  123. ^ "First Bristol County National Bank". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d. Web.
  124. ^ "Smart Memorial Library". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d. Web.
  125. ^ "Rehoboth Village Cemetery - Lake, Hiram Chapel". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d. Web.
  126. ^ Sanitary Engineer 21 June 1883: 67.
  127. ^ Board of Trade Journal Feb. 1905: 503.
  128. ^ Tolles, Bryant F., Jr. Summer by the Seaside. 2008.
  129. ^ Murphy, Hindle & Wright Architects records