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Wikipedia:WikiProject Newspapers

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Here's an example of the kind of "stub" article we're creating. Just enough info to get a sense of the paper; creates the possibility of others building on it in the future. This one is the Wallowa County Chieftain of eastern Oregon.


Welcome to the Newspapers on Wikipedia (NOW) WikiProject!

This project aims to fill an important gap on Wikipedia: Several thousand local newspapers have no Wikipedia entry, or have a very minimal stub. Many meet Wikipedia's general notability guideline. When people read stories from one of these newspapers (while reading or writing Wikipedia articles, or in any scenario), Wikipedia should serve as a resource for them to evaluate, at least at a basic level, its quality as a source. This project's current major initiative is to create 1,000 useful stub articles, with infoboxes, for U.S.-based newspapers by December 15, 2018.

Since it should be a relatively simple task to gather and assemble the information for a short stub article, we hope to recruit some new Wikipedia editors, such as students guided by class assignments, in the process.

If this goes well, we hope it can serve as a model for future projects for newspapers from other parts of the world, or to other topics.

Contents

Scope of work to be doneEdit

 
Full map visible here. Snapshot generated on September 11, 2018.
  Wikidata entry
  Wikidata entry & Wikipedia article
  Wikidata entry & Wikipedia article w/ infobox

This Wikidata query will generate an up-to-date map of all U.S. newspapers with a Wikidata entry. Once you generate the live map, you can zoom in on specific locations, and click on the dots to get links to the Wikidata and Wikipedia entries. (See legend in screenshot at right.) To generate the map, first click the link, then click the blue arrow on the lower left of the page. Thanks to 99of9 for creating the query!

TasklistsEdit

There are two major tasks to creating these pages.

First, we create the missing article for the newspaper. Instructions on that here. It can take anywhere from one to four hours to do.

When you do this, we encourage you leave the infobox undone, so that someone else can contribute to it. Move it to the "Needs Infobox" section.

Someone else will add the infobox, and provide any double-checking of the article. When the infobox is added the page is complete.

Add InfoboxEdit

Go to Add infobox and add an infobox to a existing local newspaper page that does not have one.

Add New PageEdit

We have put together some lists of pages organized semi-geographically that you can "adopt" State-based Lists. We hope to do this for all states soon.

You can also go to Add New Page and add a Wikipedia page for a local newspaper that does not have one, then put it in the Needs Infobox pile.

Resolve IssuesEdit

Go to Resolve Issues to either put difficult pages in that queue or attempt to resolve them. If editors hit thorny issues with a page (e.g. can't find anything on a page, can't sort through convoluted history, etc) they will put it here for people looking for a challenge.

Pages AddedEdit

Go here to see pages in the project that have been created and have an infobox: Pages Added. Eventually we hope to autogenerate this page, but for the moment you can put pages that have been created and given an infobox here.

MediaEdit

  • "Wellesley's Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon Engages Students in Information Literacy Efforts". Wellesley.com. December 7, 2018.
  • Mustafaraj, Eni (23 September 2018). "The information panels on Google and Facebook: Uncovering their blind spots". Medium.
  • "Students Join Wikipedia Effort to Help Verify Local News Sources". Middlebury. 19 September 2018.
  • Blatchford, Taylor (3 July 2018). "Digital literacy project sets an ambitious goal: Wikipedia pages for 1,000 local newspapers". Poynter. Poynter Institute.
  • Lee Skallerup Bessette (June 29, 2018), "Make Wikipedia Even Better (And Support a Great Cause!)", ProfHacker blog, Chronicle of Higher Education

CategoriesEdit

It's worthwhile to add at least two categories to every article upon publication. This is a good general rule of thumb, and for newspaper articles there are two easy choices, which should be pretty easy to find:

To add a category to the article, use the "edit source" tab, and at the bottom of the article, add code that looks like this:

[[Category:Newspapers published in Oregon]] [[Category:Multnomah County, Oregon]]

While an article is in the "Draft" stage, the Category should be "disabled" by placing a colon inside the first set of square brackets, like this:

[[:Category:Newspapers published in Oregon]] [[:Category:Multnomah County, Oregon]]

Adding categories is not "mission critical," as others can always come along and add them later. But it is part of publishing an article that experienced Wikipedians will consider "complete." A very useful tool for adding categories to published articles (not drafts) is HotCat, which you can enable in the "gadgets" tab in your user preferences.

TemplatesEdit

To place this on your user page, paste this code: {{User WikiProject Newspapers}}

 This user participates in
WikiProject Newspapers.
talk

To place this on an article's talk page, paste this code: {{WikiProject Newspapers}}

WikiProject Newspapers (Rated Project-class)
This page is within the scope of WikiProject Newspapers, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Newspapers on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
  Project  This page does not require a rating on the project's quality scale.

Related projectsEdit