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The Weatherill Ministry was the 72nd Ministry of the Government of South Australia, led by Jay Weatherill of the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party. It commenced on 21 October 2011, when Weatherill succeeded Mike Rann as Premier and Labor leader.[1][2]

Contents

First formationEdit

Office Minister

Premier of South Australia
Minister for State Development

Jay Weatherill MHA

Deputy Premier of South Australia
Attorney-General of South Australia
Minister for Planning
Minister for Business Services and Consumers

John Rau MHA

Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
Minister for Forests
Minister for Regional Development
Minister for Tourism
Minister for the Status of Women

Gail Gago MLC

Minister for Transport and Infrastructure
Minister for Housing and Urban Development

Patrick Conlon MHA

Treasurer of South Australia
Minister for Workers Rehabilitation
Minister for Defence Industries
Minister for Veterans' Affairs

Jack Snelling MHA

Minister for Health and Ageing
Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse
Minister for the Arts

John Hill MHA

Minister for Police
Minister for Correctional Services
Minister for Emergency Services
Minister for Road Safety
Minister for Multicultural Affairs

Jennifer Rankine MHA

Minister for Sustainability, Environment and Conservation
Minister for Water and the River Murray
Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation

Paul Caica MHA

Minister for Manufacturing, Innovation and Trade
Minister for Mineral Resources and Energy
Minister for Small Business

Tom Koutsantonis MHA

Minister for Finance
Minister for the Public Sector

Michael O'Brien MHA

Minister for Education and Child Development

Grace Portolesi MHA

Minister for Employment, Higher Education and Skills
Minister for Science and Information Economy
Minister for Recreation and Sport

Tom Kenyon MHA

Minister for Industrial Relations
Minister for State/Local Government Relations

Russell Wortley MLC

Minister for Transport Services

Chloë Fox MHA

Minister for Communities and Social Inclusion
Minister for Social Housing
Minister for Disabilities
Minister for Youth
Minister for Volunteers

Ian Hunter MLC

Second formationEdit

Weatherill made a major reshuffle of the ministry on 21 January 2013, following the resignations of a number of ministers.[3][4]

Office Minister

Premier of South Australia
Treasurer of South Australia
Minister for the Public Sector
Minister for the Arts

Jay Weatherill MHA

Deputy Premier of South Australia
Attorney-General of South Australia
Minister for Planning
Minister for Industrial Relations
Minister for Business Services and Consumers

John Rau MHA

Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
Minister for Forests
Minister for Regional Development
Minister for the Status of Women
Minister for State/Local Government Relations

Gail Gago MLC

Minister for Health and Ageing
Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse
Minister for Defence Industries
Minister for Veterans' Affairs

Jack Snelling MHA

Minister for Education and Child Development
Minister for Multicultural Affairs

Jennifer Rankine MHA

Minister for Transport and Infrastructure
Minister for Mineral Resources and Energy
Minister for Housing and Urban Development

Tom Koutsantonis MHA

Minister for Finance
Minister for Police
Minister for Correctional Services
Minister for Emergency Services
Minister for Road Safety

Michael O'Brien MHA

Minister for Employment, Higher Education and Skills
Minister for Science and Information Economy

Grace Portolesi MHA

Minister for Manufacturing, Innovation and Trade
Minister for Small Business

Tom Kenyon MHA

Minister for Transport Services
Minister Assisting the Minister for the Arts

Chloë Fox MHA

Minister for Sustainability, Environment and Conservation
Minister for Water and the River Murray
Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation

Ian Hunter MLC

Minister for Communities and Social Inclusion
Minister for Social Housing
Minister for Disabilities
Minister for Youth
Minister for Volunteers

Tony Piccolo MHA

Minister for Tourism
Minister for Recreation and Sport

Leon Bignell MHA

Third formationEdit

Weatherill reshuffled cabinet on 26 March 2014, following the government's re-election at the 2014 state election.[5][6]

It was followed by two minor changes: the appointment of former Liberal leader turned independent Martin Hamilton-Smith on 27 May 2014, and the resignation of Jennifer Rankine and her replacement by Kyam Maher on 3 February 2015.[7][8][9][10]

Party Minister Portfolio
Labor Hon. Jay Weatherill, MHA
Labor Hon. John Rau, MHA
Labor Hon. Gail Gago, MLC
Labor Hon. Jack Snelling, MHA
  • Minister for Health
  • Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse
  • Minister for the Arts
  • Minister for Defence Industries (until 27 May 2014)
  • Minister for Health Industries
Labor Hon. Jennifer Rankine, MHA
  • Minister for Education and Child Development (until 3 February 2015)
Labor Hon. Tom Koutsantonis, MHA
  • Treasurer of South Australia
  • Minister for Finance
  • Minister for State Development
  • Minister for Mineral Resources and Energy
  • Minister for Automotive Transformation (until 27 May 2014)
  • Minister for Small Business
Labor Hon. Ian Hunter, MLC
  • Minister for Sustainability, Environment and Conservation
  • Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation (until 3 February 2015)
  • Minister for Climate Change (from 3 February 2015)
  • Minister for Water and the River Murray
Labor Hon. Tony Piccolo, MHA
  • Minister for Disabilities
  • Minister for Police
  • Minister for Correctional Services
  • Minister for Emergency Services
  • Minister for Road Safety
Labor Hon. Leon Bignell, MHA
  • Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
  • Minister for Forests
  • Minister for Tourism
  • Minister for Recreation and Sport
  • Minister for Racing
Independent Hon. Geoff Brock, MHA
  • Minister for Regional Development
  • Minister for Local Government
Labor Hon. Zoe Bettison, MHA
  • Minister for Communities and Social Inclusion
  • Minister for Social Housing
  • Minister for Multicultural Affairs
  • Minister for Ageing
  • Minister for Youth
  • Minister for Veterans' Affairs (until 27 May 2014)
  • Minister for Volunteers
Labor Hon. Susan Close, MHA
  • Minister for the Public Sector
  • Minister for Manufacturing, Innovation and Trade (until 27 May 2014)
  • Minister for Manufacturing and Innovation (from 27 May 2014 to 3 February 2015)
  • Minister for Automotive Transformation (from 27 May 2014 to 3 February 2015)
  • Minister for Education and Child Development (from 3 February 2015)
Labor Hon. Stephen Mullighan, MHA
  • Minister for Transport and Infrastructure
  • Minister Assisting the Minister for Planning
  • Minister Assisting the Minister for Housing and Urban Development
Independent
Liberal
Hon. Martin Hamilton-Smith, MHA
  • Minister for Investment and Trade (from 23 May 2014)
  • Minister for Defence Industries (from 23 May 2014)
  • Minister for Veterans’ Affairs (from 23 May 2014)
Labor Hon. Kyam Maher, MLC
  • Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation (from 3 February 2015)
  • Minister for Manufacturing and Innovation (from 3 February 2015)
  • Minister for Automotive Transformation (from 3 February 2015)

^Non-Labor MHAs Hamilton-Smith and Brock joined the Labor minority government cabinet following the 2014 election. Though later that year when it became a majority government following the 2014 Fisher by-election, Hamilton-Smith and Brock were kept in cabinet.

Fourth formationEdit

Tony Piccolo announced his resignation from cabinet on 12 January 2016, citing cabinet renewal, ahead of an imminent cabinet reshuffle.[11] Gail Gago announced her resignation from cabinet three days later, also citing cabinet renewal.[12][13]

Peter Malinauskas and Leesa Vlahos were announced as the new cabinet members on 18 January. Swearing in and portfolio allocations occurred on 19 February.[14][15]

Party Minister Portfolio
Labor Hon. Jay Weatherill, MHA
Labor Hon. John Rau, MHA
Labor Hon. Kyam Maher, MLC
Labor Hon. Jack Snelling, MHA
Labor Hon. Tom Koutsantonis, MHA
Labor Hon. Ian Hunter, MLC
  • Minister for Sustainability, Environment and Conservation
  • Minister for Water and the River Murray
  • Minister for Climate Change
Labor Hon. Leon Bignell, MHA
  • Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
  • Minister for Forests
  • Minister for Tourism
  • Minister for Recreation and Sport
  • Minister for Racing
Independent
Liberal
Hon. Martin Hamilton-Smith, MHA
  • Minister for Investment and Trade
  • Minister for Small Business
  • Minister for Defence Industries
  • Minister for Veterans’ Affairs
Independent Hon. Geoff Brock, MHA
  • Minister for Regional Development
  • Minister for Local Government
Labor Hon. Zoe Bettison, MHA
  • Minister for Communities and Social Inclusion
  • Minister for Social Housing
  • Minister for the Status of Women
  • Minister for Ageing
  • Minister for Multicultural Affairs
  • Minister for Youth
  • Minister for Volunteers
Labor Hon. Susan Close, MHA
  • Minister for Education and Child Development
  • Minister for Higher Education and Skills
Labor Hon. Stephen Mullighan, MHA
  • Minister for Transport and Infrastructure
  • Minister for Housing and Urban Development
Labor Hon. Leesa Vlahos, MHA
  • Minister for Disabilities
  • Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse
Labor Hon. Peter Malinauskas, MLC
  • Minister for Police
  • Minister for Correctional Services
  • Minister for Emergency Services
  • Minister for Road Safety

Fifth formationEdit

Jack Snelling announced his resignation as Minister for Health, Minister for the Arts & Minister for Health Industries on 17 September 2017, citing his desire to spend more time with family after 20 years in public life. He also announced that he would not be seeking election for the seat of Florey in 2018, after an ugly pre-selection fight with sitting member Frances Bedford.[16] Leesa Vlahos announced her resignation as Minister for Mental Health one day later, citing her own health issues.[17] Both ministers had been under intense scrutiny for their handling of their respective portfolios, with the Transforming Health program widely criticized, and the states mental health facilities plagued with problems.[18]

Chris Picton and Katrine Hildyard were announced as the new cabinet members on 18 September. Peter Malinauskas moved from his former portfolios of Police and Emergency Services, into a "super-health' portfolio as Minister for Health, and Minister for Mental Health.[19]

Party Minister Portfolio
Labor Hon. Jay Weatherill, MHA
Labor Hon. John Rau, MHA
Labor Hon. Kyam Maher, MLC
Labor Hon. Tom Koutsantonis, MHA
Labor Hon. Ian Hunter, MLC
  • Minister for Sustainability, Environment and Conservation
  • Minister for Water and the River Murray
  • Minister for Climate Change
Labor Hon. Leon Bignell, MHA
  • Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
  • Minister for Forests
  • Minister for Tourism
  • Minister for Recreation and Sport
  • Minister for Racing
Independent
Liberal
Hon. Martin Hamilton-Smith, MHA
  • Minister for Investment and Trade
  • Minister for Small Business
  • Minister for Defence Industries
  • Minister for Veterans’ Affairs
  • Minister for Health Industries
Independent Hon. Geoff Brock, MHA
  • Minister for Regional Development
  • Minister for Local Government
Labor Hon. Zoe Bettison, MHA
  • Minister for Communities and Social Inclusion
  • Minister for Social Housing
  • Minister for the Status of Women
  • Minister for Ageing
  • Minister for Multicultural Affairs
  • Minister for Youth
  • Minister for Volunteers
Labor Hon. Susan Close, MHA
  • Minister for Education and Child Development
  • Minister for Higher Education and Skills
Labor Hon. Stephen Mullighan, MHA
  • Minister for Transport and Infrastructure
  • Minister for Housing and Urban Development
Labor Hon. Peter Malinauskas, MLC
  • Minister for Health
  • Minister for Mental Health
Labor Hon. Katrine Hildyard, MHA
  • Minister for Disabilities
Labor Hon. Chris Picton, MHA
  • Minister for Police
  • Minister for Correctional Services
  • Minister for Emergency Services
  • Minister for Road Safety

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

1 Geoff Brock and Martin Hamilton-Smith continued to sit as independent MHAs while serving in a Labor ministry.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Ministry - Order of Precedence - As at 21 October 2011". Parliament of South Australia. Archived from the original on 29 November 2011. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  2. ^ "Friday 21 October 2011" (PDF). The South Australian Government Gazette. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  3. ^ "Ministry - Order of Precedence - As at 21 January 2013". Parliament of South Australia. Archived from the original on 15 June 2013. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  4. ^ "Monday 21 January 2013" (PDF). The South Australian Government Gazette. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  5. ^ "Ministry - Order of Precedence - As at 26 March 2014". Parliament of South Australia. Archived from the original on 13 May 2014. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  6. ^ "Wednesday 26 March 2014" (PDF). The South Australian Government Gazette. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  7. ^ "Ministry - Order of Precedence - As at 27 May 2014". Parliament of South Australia. Archived from the original on 6 December 2014. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  8. ^ "Tuesday 27 May 2014" (PDF). The South Australian Government Gazette. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  9. ^ "Ministry - Order of Precedence - As at 3 February 2015". Parliament of South Australia. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  10. ^ "Tuesday 3 February 2015" (PDF). The South Australian Government Gazette. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  11. ^ Tony Piccolo resigns as South Australian Police Minister ahead of Cabinet reshuffle: ABC 12 January 2016
  12. ^ Gail Gago resigns as South Australian employment minister: ABC 15 December 2016
  13. ^ Right to claim both vacancies: InDaily 15 December 2016
  14. ^ Peter Malinauskas, Leesa Vlahos confirmed as new members of SA Labor ministry: ABC 18 January 2016
  15. ^ Reshuffle, Peter Malinauskas and Leesa Vlahos join Jay Weatherill’s Cabinet: The Advertiser 18 January 2016
  16. ^ [1]
  17. ^ [2]
  18. ^ [3]
  19. ^ [4]