Washington County, Vermont

Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Vermont. Named after George Washington, its county seat is the city of Montpelier (the least populous state capital in the United States) and the most populous municipality is the city of Barre.[1] As of the 2020 census, the population was 59,807,[2] making it the third-most populous county in Vermont, but the third-least populous capital county in the United States after Hughes County, South Dakota and Franklin County, Kentucky.

Washington County
Washington County Courthouse
Washington County Courthouse
Map of Vermont highlighting Washington County
Location within the U.S. state of Vermont
Map of the United States highlighting Vermont
Vermont's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°14′57″N 72°34′51″W / 44.249287°N 72.580894°W / 44.249287; -72.580894
Country United States
State Vermont
Founded1811
Named forGeorge Washington
Shire TownMontpelier
Largest cityBarre
Area
 • Total695 sq mi (1,800 km2)
 • Land687 sq mi (1,780 km2)
 • Water8.2 sq mi (21 km2)  1.2%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total59,807
 • Density86/sq mi (33/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districtAt-large

Washington County comprises the Barre, Vermont micropolitan statistical area.

In 2010, the center of population of Vermont was located in Washington County, in the town of Warren.[3]

HistoryEdit

Washington County is one of several Vermont counties created from land ceded by the state of New York on January 15, 1777, when Vermont declared itself to be a distinct state from New York.[4][5][6] The land originally was contested by Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Netherland, but it remained undelineated until July 20, 1764, when King George III established the boundary between New Hampshire and New York along the west bank of the Connecticut River, north of Massachusetts and south of the parallel of 45 degrees north latitude. New York assigned the land gained to Albany County.[7][8] On March 12, 1772, Albany County was partitioned to create Charlotte County,[9] and this situation remained until Vermont's independence from New York and Britain.

Washington County was originally established as Jefferson County in 1810 from parts of Caledonia County, Chittenden County, and Orange County and organized the following year.[10]

In 1814 it was renamed to Washington County. The name change occurred after the Federalists took control of the Vermont Legislature from the Jeffersonians. Vermont which conducted significant trade with British Canada had suffered particularly by passage of the Embargo Act of 1807 during the Jefferson administration.[11]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 695 square miles (1,800 km2), of which 687 square miles (1,780 km2) is land and 8.2 square miles (21 km2) (1.2%) is water.[12]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

National protected areaEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
182014,113
183021,37851.5%
184023,50610.0%
185024,6544.9%
186027,61212.0%
187026,520−4.0%
188025,404−4.2%
189029,60616.5%
190036,60723.6%
191041,70213.9%
192038,921−6.7%
193041,7337.2%
194041,546−0.4%
195042,8703.2%
196042,8600.0%
197047,65911.2%
198052,3939.9%
199054,9284.8%
200058,0395.7%
201059,5342.6%
202059,8090.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]
1790–1960[14] 1900–1990[15]
1990–2000[16] 2010–2018[2]

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 59,534 people, 25,027 households, and 15,410 families residing in the county.[17] The population density was 86.6 inhabitants per square mile (33.4/km2). There were 29,941 housing units at an average density of 43.6 per square mile (16.8/km2).[18]

Of the 25,027 households, 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.1% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 38.4% were non-families, and 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.81. The median age was 42.3 years.[17]

The median income for a household in the county was $55,313 and the median income for a family was $66,968. Males had a median income of $45,579 versus $38,052 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,337. About 5.9% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.8% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over.[19]

ElectionsEdit

In 1828, Washington County was won by National Republican Party candidate John Quincy Adams.

In 1832, the county was won by Democratic Party incumbent president Andrew Jackson. Democratic Martin Van Buren was also able to win the county in 1836.

In 1840, the county was won by Whig Party candidate William Henry Harrison.

In 1844, the county was won by Democratic candidate James K. Polk. Democratic candidate Lewis Cass was also able to win the county in 1848.

In 1852, Whig Party candidate Winfield Scott won the county.

From John C. Frémont in 1856 to Richard Nixon in 1960, the Republican Party would have a 104-year winning streak within Washington County.

In 1964, the county was won by Democratic Party incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Following the Democrats victory in 1964, the county went back to voting for Republican candidates for another 20 year winning streak starting with Richard Nixon in 1968 and ending with George H. W. Bush in 1988, who became the last Republican presidential candidate to win the county.

In 1992, the county was won by Bill Clinton and has been won by Democratic candidates ever since.

United States presidential election results for Washington County, Vermont[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 8,928 25.29% 25,191 71.35% 1,188 3.36%
2016 7,993 25.71% 18,594 59.81% 4,499 14.47%
2012 8,093 27.61% 20,351 69.44% 863 2.94%
2008 9,129 28.35% 22,324 69.33% 747 2.32%
2004 11,461 36.44% 19,177 60.98% 810 2.58%
2000 11,448 38.48% 15,281 51.37% 3,020 10.15%
1996 7,750 29.94% 14,267 55.12% 3,867 14.94%
1992 9,424 32.12% 13,452 45.85% 6,462 22.03%
1988 13,253 50.40% 12,690 48.26% 351 1.33%
1984 13,706 54.48% 11,163 44.37% 289 1.15%
1980 9,714 41.96% 9,559 41.29% 3,878 16.75%
1976 10,919 53.90% 8,764 43.26% 576 2.84%
1972 12,421 61.58% 7,596 37.66% 152 0.75%
1968 9,387 52.62% 7,826 43.87% 626 3.51%
1964 5,750 32.37% 12,002 67.57% 11 0.06%
1960 10,458 59.49% 7,116 40.48% 4 0.02%
1956 11,351 71.50% 4,520 28.47% 5 0.03%
1952 11,979 72.59% 4,460 27.03% 64 0.39%
1948 7,720 59.92% 4,839 37.56% 324 2.51%
1944 7,162 55.47% 5,749 44.53% 0 0.00%
1940 8,426 52.00% 7,727 47.69% 50 0.31%
1936 8,351 50.64% 8,073 48.96% 66 0.40%
1932 8,393 57.72% 5,777 39.73% 370 2.54%
1928 9,891 68.91% 4,408 30.71% 54 0.38%
1924 8,525 74.30% 1,715 14.95% 1,234 10.75%
1920 6,418 75.76% 1,953 23.06% 100 1.18%
1916 4,216 57.11% 2,732 37.01% 434 5.88%
1912 2,797 41.26% 1,743 25.71% 2,239 33.03%
1908 3,823 67.86% 1,610 28.58% 201 3.57%
1904 3,807 72.07% 1,247 23.61% 228 4.32%
1900 3,819 68.94% 1,622 29.28% 99 1.79%
1896 4,476 73.10% 1,396 22.80% 251 4.10%
1892 3,134 60.28% 1,940 37.31% 125 2.40%
1888 3,715 64.70% 1,892 32.95% 135 2.35%
1884 3,129 60.00% 1,812 34.75% 274 5.25%
1880 3,611 62.67% 1,927 33.44% 224 3.89%


CommunitiesEdit

CitiesEdit

TownsEdit

VillageEdit

Census-designated placesEdit

Other unincorporated communitiesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  3. ^ "Centers of Population by State: 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 6, 2014.
  4. ^ Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. P. 70-73.
  5. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 64.
  6. ^ Williamson, Chilton. Vermont in Quandary: 1763-1825. Growth of Vermont series, Number 4. Montpelier: Vermont Historical Series, 1949. PP. 82-84; map facing 95, 100-102, 112-113.
  7. ^ Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. pp.13-19.
  8. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 63.
  9. ^ New York Colonial Laws, Chapter 1534; Section 5; Paragraph 321)
  10. ^ "Vermont: Individual County Chronologies". Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  11. ^ "And They Called The County Washington". Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce. Central Vermont Magazine. Summer 1988. Retrieved October 10, 2016.
  12. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  13. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  14. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  15. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  16. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  17. ^ a b "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  18. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  19. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 26, 2018.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 44°16′N 72°37′W / 44.27°N 72.62°W / 44.27; -72.62