Walter Schartner

Walter Schartner (3 December 1894 – 24 May 1970[1]) was a German conductor, composer and Hochschullehrer. In 1946, he was appointed Generalmusikdirektor in Halle and as such he directed the Orchestra of the Halle Opera House [de ]. In 1949/50, he was chief conductor of the Philharmonisches Staatsorchester Halle [de].

LifeEdit

Schartner was born in Berlin in 1894.[1] There he attended the Stern Conservatory where Leo Blech was his main teacher.[1] A first Kapellmeister position in Königsberg was followed by posts in Münster and Bremerhaven.[1] In 1926, he conducted the Hans Rudolf Waldburg production of Handel's opera Rodelinda in Bremerhaven. From 1928 to 1944, he worked in Görlitz.[1] In 1928, he became musical director of the Theatre Görlitz [de], and in 1930 took over the symphony concerts.[2]

In 1945, Schartner was appointed director of the Hochschule für Musik Carl Maria von Weber Dresden.[1] Guest conducting led him among others at the Semperoper and the Dresden Philharmonic.[3] After a guest performance in Halle in 1946, he received his appointment as Municipal Music Director by the Lord Mayor of Halle, Karl Pretzsch [de] at the suggestion of the Theatre Committee. [1] In June 1946, he conducted his first symphony concert in Halle. [1] Following a proposal by Pretzsch, the president of the province of Saxony, Erhard Hübener, appointed him Generalmusikdirektor in September 1946.[1] In 1948, he conducted the premiere of Handels Xerses at the Thalia Theater; the production was directed by Sigurd Baller. In Halle, he also made a name for himself as a composer, and in 1948 his opera Und Pippa tanzt based on And Pippa dances! [de] eponymous play by Gerhart Hauptmann was premiered at the Landestheater. [1] He also headed the opera department at the Staatliche Hochschule für Theater und Musik Halle [de]. [3] In April 1949, Richard Schallock [de], the Minister for National Education, Arts and Science, declared that his contract as general music director would not be renewed.[1] Nevertheless, he was appointed artistic director of the Philharmonic State Orchestra Halle in 1949/50.[1]

In 1950, Schartner received a proposition from the Hochschule für Musik Carl Maria von Weber.[4] In 1950/51, he was conductor of the {Loh-Orchester Sondershausen [de].[5] After that, he was conductor of the Berliner Rundfunk.[6] In 1951, together with the Berlin Radio Choir and the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra he presented the complete opera recording of ' Lortzing's Regina. [7] Later he was 1st Kapellmeister and Musical Director of the Volkspark Rehberge in West Berlin.[6]

Until his death, Schartner was married with the composer, pianist, lyricist and chanson interpreter Jeanette Chéro (born 1927, née Roscher, civil name Christiane Schartner).[8]

Further readingEdit

  • Susanne Baselt: Chronik des Philharmonischen Staatsorchesters Halle. Part I: 1946 bis 1964. Edited by the management of the Philharmonic State Orchestra Halle, 1999, pp. 38ff.
  • Herbert A. Frenzel [de], Hans Joachim Moser (ed.): Kürschners biographisches Theater-Handbuch. Schauspiel, Oper, Film, Rundfunk. Deutschland, Österreich, Schweiz. de Gruyter, Berlin 1956, p. 637.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Susanne Baselt: Chronik des Philharmonischen Staatsorchesters Halle. Part I: 1946 bis 1964. Edited by the management of the Philharmonic State Orchestra Halle, Halle (Saale) 1999, pp. 38f.
  2. ^ Ernst Kretzschmar: Görlitz unter dem Hakenkreuz (Schriftenreihe der Städtischen Kunstsammlungen. N.F. H. 18). Städtische Kunstsammlungen, Görlitz 1982, p. 39.
  3. ^ a b Gisela Heine: Das Philharmonische Staatsorchester Halle. G. Heine, Halle (Saale) 1997, p. 11.
  4. ^ Susanne Baselt: Chronik des Philharmonischen Staatsorchesters Halle. Part I: 1946 bis 1964. Edited by the management of the Philharmonic State Orchestra Halle, Halle (Saale) 1999, p. 41.
  5. ^ html Names of the Kapellmeisters of the Hofkapelle and the conductors of the Loh-Orchester Sondershausen, foerderverein-loh-orchester.de, retrieved 20 September 2020.
  6. ^ a b Herbert A. Frenzel, Hans Joachim Moser (ed.): Kürschners biographisches Theater-Handbuch. Drama, opera, film, radio. Germany, Austria, Switzerland. Walter de Gruyter, Berlin 1956, p. 637.
  7. ^ Karsten Steiger: Opera Discography: Index of all audio and video recordings. 2nd, completely updated and extended edition, Saur, Munich 2008, ISBN 978-3-598-11784-8, p. 237.
  8. ^ Norbert Beleke (ed.): Wer ist wer? Das deutsche Who’s Who. 45th edition (2006/07), Schmidt-Römhild, Lübeck 2006, ISBN 3-7950-2042-5, p. 204.

External linksEdit