Virginia literature

The literature of Virginia, United States, includes fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Representative authors include Rita Dove, Ellen Glasgow, William Hoffman, Lee Smith, Carolyn Kreiter-Foronda and William Styron.[1][2] Journals featuring work of Virginia writers include the New Virginia Review (est. 1978), Richmond Quarterly (est. 1980), Edgar Allan Poe Review (est. 2000), and Virginia Adversaria (est. 2000).[2]

HistoryEdit

A printing press began operating in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1682.[3] Colonial- and Federal-era writers included John Smith (True Relation of Occurrences and Accidents in Virginia, 1608); Robert Beverley, Jr. (History and Present State of Virginia, 1705); Arthur Blackamore (Religious Triumverate, 1720); Thomas Jefferson (Notes on the State of Virginia, 1785).[4]

Literary figures of the antebellum period included Edgar Allan Poe and Virginia-born writers William Alexander Caruthers (1802–1846), John Esten Cooke (1830-1886), Philip Pendleton Cooke (1816 -1850), Nathaniel Beverley Tucker (1784-1851).[5] The Southern Literary Messenger launched in Richmond in 1834.[6]

Marion Fontaine Cabell Tyree's Housekeeping in Old Virginia, a cookbook, was published in Richmond in 1878.[7]

OrganizationsEdit

The Poetry Society of Virginia formed in 1923.[8]

Awards and eventsEdit

The Virginia General Assembly created the position of Poet Laureate of Virginia in 1936.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Longest 2001.
  2. ^ a b Huggins 2003.
  3. ^ Lawrence C. Wroth (1938), "Diffusion of Printing", The Colonial Printer, Portland, Maine: Southworth-Anthoensen Press – via Internet Archive (Fulltext)
  4. ^ Charles Reagan Wilson; William Ferris, eds. (1989). "Beginnings of Southern Literature". Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. University of North Carolina Press. ISBN 0807818232 – via Documenting the American South.
  5. ^ Charles Reagan Wilson; William Ferris, eds. (1989). "Antebellum Era". Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. University of North Carolina Press. ISBN 0807818232 – via Documenting the American South.
  6. ^ Hayes 2015.
  7. ^ "Regional American Cooking: South and Border States", Feeding America: the Historic American Cookbook Project, Michigan State University, retrieved March 13, 2017
  8. ^ "About PSV". Poetry Society of Virginia. Retrieved March 11, 2017.

BibliographyEdit

External linksEdit