Viktor Burić

Viktor Burić (6 September 1897 – 20 August 1983) was a Croatian archbishop of the Roman Catholic Church.

His Eminence

Viktor Burić
Archbishop of Rijeka-Senj
ChurchRoman Catholic Church
ArchdioceseArchdiocese of Rijenka-Senj
Appointed20 August 1969
Term ended18 April 1974
PredecessorUgo Camozzo
SuccessorJosip Pavlišić
Orders
Ordination27 June 1920 (Priest)
Consecration21 July 1935 (Bishop)
by Anton Bauer
Personal details
Born6 September 1897
Kraljevica, Austro-Hungarian Empire (present day in Croatia)
Died20 August 1983(1983-08-20) (aged 85)
Rijeka, SFR Yugoslavia (present day in Croatia)
Previous postBishop of Senj-Modruš (1935-1969)

LifeEdit

Viktor Burić was born in Rijeka, Croatia, on 6 September 1897, and was ordained on 27 June 1920.[1] Monsignor Burić served as secretary for Bishop, Mgr. Starcevic.[2]

In 1935 the dioceses of Senj and Modrussa were joined, with Modrussa retaining certain prerogatives. Burič was appointed Bishop of Senj-Modruš, and was consecrated in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Zagreb by the Archbishop of Zagreb, Mgr. Bauer assisted by the Bishop of Veglia. The solemn enthronement in Senj was followed by a Pontifical Mass sung in Old Slovenian, with the Epistle and Gospel in the vernacular Croat. There was a separate ceremony later of enthronement as Bishop of Modrussa.[2] He served as bishop for 33 years.[1]

He was appointed Archbishop of Rijeka in 1969, and served until his retirement in 1974.[1] He died in 1983 at the age of 85.[1]

ViewsEdit

Viktor Burić supported the Independent State of Croatia (NDH) probably because of its strict espousal of Roman Catholicism as its state religion.[3] Later, he supported the Communist government of Yugoslavia for its friendly stance towards the Vatican.[4] Theologically, he was quite conservative. He suspended liberal Croatian priest, Fr. Tihomir Zovko, for creating a lay group with the purpose of discussing priestly celibacy and democracy inside the Church.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Archbishop Viktor Burić [Catholic-Hierarchy]". www.catholic-hierarchy.org. Retrieved 2015-10-21.
  2. ^ a b "Orbis Terrarum" (Yugoslavia), The Tablet, 17 August 1935
  3. ^ Ramet, Sabrina P. (2006-01-01). The Three Yugoslavias: State-building and Legitimation, 1918-2005. Indiana University Press. ISBN 0253346568.
  4. ^ a b "The Daily Press" (PDF). Fulton History. Fulton History. 9 June 1971. Retrieved 20 October 2015.

Further readingEdit