Victor Joseph Katz (born 31 December 1942, Philadelphia)[1] is an American mathematician, historian of mathematics, and teacher known for using the history of mathematics in teaching mathematics.

BiographyEdit

Katz received in 1963 from Princeton University a bachelor's degree and in 1968 from Brandeis University a Ph.D. in mathematics under Maurice Auslander with thesis The Brauer group of a regular local ring.[2] He became at Federal City College an assistant professor and then in 1973 an associate professor and, after the merger of Federal City College into the University of the District of Columbia in 1977, a full professor there in 1980. He retired there as professor emeritus in 2005.

As a mathematician Katz specializes in algebra, but he is mainly known for his work on the history of mathematics and its uses in teaching. He wrote a textbook History of Mathematics: An Introduction (1993), for which he won in 1995 the Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize. He organized workshops and congresses for the MAA and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. The MAA published a collection of teaching materials by Katz as a compact disk with the title Historical Modules for the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics. With Frank Swetz, he was a founding editor of a free online journal on the history of mathematics under the aegis of the MAA; the journal is called Convergence: Where Mathematics, History, and Teaching Interact.[3] In the journal Convergence, Katz and Swetz published a series Mathematical Treasures.[4][5] For a study of the possibilities for using mathematical history in schools, Katz received a grant from the National Science Foundation.

PersonalEdit

He has been married since 1969 to Phyllis Katz (née Friedman), a science educator who developed and directed the U.S. national nonprofit organization Hands On Science Outreach, Inc. (HOSO). The couple have three children.

Selected publicationsEdit

As authorEdit

As editorEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ biographical information from American Men and Women of Science, Thomson Gale 2004
  2. ^ Victor J. Katz at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  3. ^ MAA, Convergence
  4. ^ Katz, Swetz, Mathematical Treasures, Omar Khayyam's Algebra
  5. ^ Katz, V. J.; Swetz, F. (March 2011). "Mathematical Treasures" (PDF). HPM Newskletter (No 76). pp. 2–4.
  6. ^ Jongsma, Calvin (26 February 2015). "Review of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century by Victor J. Katz and Karen Hunger Parshall". MAA Reviews, Mathematical Association of America.
  7. ^ Chen, Jiang-Ping Jeff (March 2015). "Review of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century by Victor J. Katz and Karen Hunger Parshall". The College Mathematics Journal. 46 (2): 149–152. doi:10.4169/college.math.j.46.2.149.
  8. ^ Montelle, Clemency (2015). "Review of The Mathematics of Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, India, and Islam: A Sourcebook ed. by Victor J. Katz". Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science. 4: 179–191.
  9. ^ Sandifer, Ed (3 January 2001). "Review of Using History to Teach Mathematics: An International Perspective by Victor J. Katz". MAA Reviews, Mathematical Association of America.
  10. ^ Deakin, Michael A. B. (2001). "Review of Using History to Teach Mathematics: An International Perspective ed. by Victor J. Katz" (PDF). Zentralblatt für Didaktit der Mathematik. 33 (5): 137–138.
  11. ^ Gouvêa, Fernando Q. (2015). "Review of Sherlock Holmes in Babylon and Other Tales of Mathematical History ed. by Marlow Anderson, Victor Katz, and Robin Wilson". Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science. 2: 67–79.
  12. ^ Davis, Philip J. (18 October 2009). "Review of Who Gave You the Epsilon? & Other Tales of Mathematical History ed. by Marlow Anderson, Victor Katz, and Robin Wilson". SIAM News, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

External linksEdit